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August 25, 1989 - Image 42

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-08-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Asomosommosamiumwspommuswomeni

ISRAEL

THE 10TH ANNIVERSARY DINNER DANCE

OF THE

FRIENDS OF THE ISRAEL CANCER ASSOCIATION, MICHIGAN BRANCH
AND THE HANOAR CHAPTER

DR. ARTHUR FEUER

HONORING

Sunday, September 10, 1989
BETH ACHIM SYNAGOGUE

21100 W. 12 Mile Rd., Southfield

GUEST SPEAKER:

MAX SOSIN

MUSIC BY ERIC ROSENOW
AND HIS CONTINENTALS

Couvert: $60.00
Cocktails: 5:30 P.M.
per person
Dinner Following
Black Tie Optional

Ticket Committee
Alex Greenberger
646-0983
Mary Papo
967-4414
Judy Eisenberg
661-2435

AGI RUBIN
HANOAR CHAPTER PRESIDENT: LIZ LAKRITZ
DINNER CHAIRPERSON: JUDY EISENBERG
DINNER CO-CHAIRPERSONS: ANNA GREENBERGER
JUDY GRINBAUM

MICH. BRANCH PRESIDENT:

Send for ticket reservations
and/or Donations to:
Alex Greenberger
17501 Evans, Southfield, MI 48076

AD BOOK 1989
Zoltan Rubin, Faye Rosemberg

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Continued from preceding page

Arab rule. Echoing another
local Jew who called this
position xenophobic, Domb
says: "I think I know the
Arabs better than Yossi Sarid
(a left-wing politician). He
wants just [a country of] the
Jews. He's against the Arabs
more than I am. He wants to
just sit in rIbl Aviv and not see
the Arabs. Arab neighbors
don't bother me."
Should the Israeli left
prevail in a democratic
contest and reach territorial
compromise with the Arabs,
something Domb is skeptical
will occur, he is willing to
follow the directive of his
government.
"If there is a decision to
leave Hebron, I'll demon-
strate, but I'll leave Hebron,"
he says. "Because democracy
is more important."

Shlomo
when
Once,
Kupinsky was driving home
to Ramat Mamre from
Jerusalem, he saw some boys
picking up stones by the
roadside. Kupinsky figured
he'd be pelted as he drove by.
"I stopped the car and I just
looked at them," Kupinsky
says. "The kids put the stones
down. Face to face, they didn't
know if I had a gun or not.
Now I could be a threat to
them."

It's the speeding cars and
busses that attract the hails
of stones, says his wife,
Bracha. "I think it's different
one on one. If he has to see me
as a person, I don't think he
would a throw a stone at me."
The Kupinskys, former
Detroiters who have lived in
Kiryat Arba and Ramat
Mamre for seven years, have
been hit by stones several
times. While potentially
dangerous, such incidents
also provoke amusement.
Says Bracha: "We've had
rocks thrown at us while in
the car, and we'd duck.
Imagine that. Two intelligent
people in a closed car and
ducking."
Bracha, an English teacher
at Kiryat Arba's Ulpana
religious high school for girls,
and Shlomo, a demographer,
are two of the 5,000 Jews
living in Kiryat Arba and
Ramat Mamre. The two
settlements, each bearing a
biblical name for Hebron, are
surrounded by fences and
approachable through gates.
Perched on hilltops about two
miles apart, they are
connected by a road that
passes through the fields and
vineyards of Palestinian
farmers. Every Shabbat, the
Kupinsky's traverse the road
without fear of attack.
The two towns were built on
empty tracts and once were

isolated from Hebron,
residents say. "When Kiryat
Arba was built, there were no
Arab homes around," Bracha
says. Growth in the Arab
population has pushed their
settlement up to the edge of
Kiryat Arba's outer ring road.
As in Hebron, Jews and
Arabs again are next door
neighbors.
If Hebron is seen by the
faithful as the very heart of
the land of Israel, Kiryat
Arba is often seen by others
as the Jewish state's heart of
darkness — a town swirling
with religious fanaticism,
poised to set off civil war. The
Kupinskys and their friends
insist their town has received
a bad rap. Kiryat Arba, they
say is a place where kids run
freely and residents don't
have to lock their doors. It is
the town where, despite the
intifada, Palestinians con-
tinue to come to work and
where no Arab has ever been
attacked.
According to the Kupin-
skys, recounting events
involving settlers, Palestin-
ians and the army seems to be
a matter of individual
interpretation. What one
might view as an innocent act
might be seen as a
provocation by another. One
night, when Shlomo was on
guard duty, a burning tire
was thrown into Kiryat
Arba's industrial zone. Some
of the Israelis threw it back
over the fence where it rolled
down a hill, landing at the
site of a mosque under
construction. The Arabs were
convinced that the Israelis
wanted to burn down the
mosque, Shlomo says.
The army arrived and the
Arabs withdrew. "As soon as
the army left, the Arabs came
back," Shlomo says. "They
aren't afraid of the army. But
I think they know that if they
throw rocks the settlers v -
shoot."
"You think the settlers
would shoot?" Bracha asks.
"Yes," Shlomo says.

Azriel Jacobowitz is 13
years old and knows how to
end the intifada and the
Palestinian problem: drive air
conditioned busses up to the
Arabs' homes and invite
them for a ride out of the
country.
"We would say, 'You have
three months to leave. If you
don't, we will force you."
What if the Palestinians
want to remain and live in
peace with Israel? Azriel is
skeptical. "Just try it," he
says.

"You can't force the Arabs
to leave," says Azriel's father,
Nachman Jacobowitz, execu-

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