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August 25, 1989 - Image 28

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-08-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I CLOSE-UP

*
WO
spOtkOki
CO.
000**S
cove

FALL
1989

ADAT SHALOM SYNAGOGUE

29901 Middlebelt Road, Farmington Hills, MI

THE HIGH HOLIDAYS AND SUKKOT IN RABBINIC LITERATURE

Instructor:
Rabbi Rod Glogower
University of Michigan

Thursdays
4 Weeks, Sept. 7-28
7:30-8:30 p.m.

Tuition
$22.50

THE HIGH HOLIDAYS IN THE BIBLICAL PERIOD

Instructor:
Dr. Ivan Starr
Wayne State University

Tuition
$22.50

Instructor:
Ms. Cheryl Litt
Agency for Jewish Education

Tuition
$45

Thursdays
4 Weeks, Sept. 7-28
8:30-9:30 p.m.

BEGINNER'S HEBREW

Tuesdays & Thursdays
4 Weeks, Sept. 7-Oct. 3
7:30-8:30 p.m.

INTERMEDIATE HEBREW

Tuesdays & Thursdays
4 Weeks, Sept. 7-Oct. 3
8:30-9:30 p.m.

Instructor:
Ms. Cheryl Litt
Agency for Jewish Education

Tuition
$45

CONGREGATION BETH ACIM

21100 W. Twelve Mile Road, Southfield, MI

CHANGES IN THE COMMUNIST WORLD AND ITS IMPACT ON THE JEWS

I nstructor:
Dr. Zvi Gitelman
University of Michigan

Tuesdays
4 Weeks, Oct. 10-31
7:30-9:00 p.m.

Tuition
$34

TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL

7400 Telegraph Road, Birmingham, MI

FROM THE MELTING POT TO THE SWIMMING POOL: THE IMAGE
OF THE JEW IN MODERN LITERATURE, FILM AND TELEVISION

Mondays
8 Weeks, Oct. 23-Dec. 11
7:30-8:30 p.m.

Instructor:
Dr. Mashey Bernstein
University of Michigan

Tuition
$45

CONGREGATION B'NAI ISRAEL

4200 Walnut Lake Road, West Bloomfield

AN IN-DEPTH LOOK AT THE BIBLE

Wednesdays
4 Weeks, Oct. 25-Nov. 15
7:30-8:30 p.m.

Instructor:
Dr. Joseph Gutmann
Wayne State University

Tuition
$22.50

THE JEWISH WAY OF LIFE

Wednesdays
4 Weeks, Oct. 25-Nov. 15
8:30-9:30 p.m.

Instructor:
Rabbi Sherman Kirshner
Congregation B'nai Israel

Tuition
$22.50

Register at the Midrasha-College of Jewish Studies
21550 West Twelve Mile Road, Southfield

For Further information coil:
352-7117

28

FRIDAY, AUGUST 25, 1989

Bridge

Continued from preceding page

movement stands for a
distinctive vision. It's
therefore very useful to have
a clear description of those
visions.
"Emet Ve-Emunah is an im-
portant step in offering a
clarification of a complex
ideological system. It can't be
easily explained, so to have
produced a consensus docu-
ment provides an opportuni-
ty for debate and growth."
Under 16 chapter headings,
the booklet discusses such
weighty topics as God ("God
is the principal figure in the
story of the Jews and
Judaism"), Revelation ("The
single greatest event in the
history of God's revelation
took place at Sinai, but was
not limited to it"), Halachah
("an indispensable, ongoing
process") and Evil ("No
theology can ever justify .. .
the death of a single child").
Adat Shalom's Rabbi
Pachter says the book can be
an important step, but feels
more is necessary.
"I was very happy with the
concept of printing a state-
ment of principles, but as a
text I think it's missing a lot,"
he says. "Because we are a
consensus movement, it's
hard to state a clear position
on a lot of things.
"But I don't think Emet Ve-
Emunah was meant to be
seen as an end point. It's a
starting point."
Most local Conservative
rabbis have offered study
groups and courses on the
document in an attempt to
get the word out to their
members. Shaarey Zedek is
considering a plan to
distribute copies to all its
members and B'nai Moshe
gives it out to all children at
their bar or bar mitzvah.
Not all rabbis are en-
thusiastic. Rabbi Schnipper
doesn't feel the problem is
education. "One does not
have to be educated to feel a
commitment," he says. "The
basic problem is a lack of
dedication and commitment."
"I doubt most will even
bother reading it," says Beth
Achim's Rabbi Arm. "Those
who do will not change their
lives because of it. Those who
join the Conservative move-
ment generally do not do so
for philosophical or
ideological reasons, but for a
place where they feel comfor-
table. They're not going to
become observant just
because a book tells them to."
Rabbi Arm's assessment of
why people join the move-
ment may, however, be a
thing of the past. During Con-
servatism's "Golden Age"
following World War II,
thousands of people came to
Conservative congregations

as they moved away from the
cities into the suburbs. Now
many Conservative Jews are
joining the movement only
after a great deal of
soul-searching.
"Those who choose religion
today are examining it very
closely," says Adat Shalom's
Rabbi Spectre. "We're seeing
young college graduates who
are used to examining
everything. Consequently,
those who join do so not for
convenience, but for commit-
ment."
The Conservative move-
ment, Rabbi Groner says, has
developed an American-born
generation of Jewish scholars.
"We have more than 70
Solomon Schechter day
schools. We have a network of
Camp Ramah summer pro-
grams. We have United
Synagogue Youth, the largest
synagogue-based youth
organization in the world. We
are creating young, commit-
ted, Conservative Jews.
"We're entering a new stage
now," he says. "It's a stage of
maturing. The task now is not
to build synagogues for Jews,
but to build Jews for
synagogues. We have to ad-
dress that spiritual hunger.
We have to train and educate
our lay leadership.
"The issue is no longer
numbers," he says. "The issue
is quality."



I PEOPLE

li••••••

Chasidim

Continued from Page 22

a plush base, which makes
use of the whole animal, not
just the tails. The streimel is
worn only by married men,
and bridegrooms invest bet-
ween $500 and $1,500 on this
item.
The boys of Toldot Aaron
wear, like their fathers, but-
tonless shirts over which
their tzizzit are sometimes
worn. They, too, wear
knickers but with black
stockings on Shabbat and oc-
casionally a velvet vest. Their
skullcaps are white. It is an
impressive sight to look down
from the women's section of
their synagogue on Shabbat
or holidays and see the
rotating circles of dancers; the
little boys on the inside, all
dressed alike; around them a
circle of the post-bar mitzvah
boys; and in the outer circle
the married men all wearing
their streimel and golden
kapote, graybeards and young
men, all ecstatically engross-
ed in sanctifying the holy day
through song and dance.
Upstairs, the women of the
congregation are also dressed
in distinctive Shabbat garb.

s

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