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August 25, 1989 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-08-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

LOCAL NEWS

THE ZIONIST ORGANIZATION
OF AMERICA
Metropolitan Detroit District

INVITES
YOU TO f

0140

i

vim

1 40:6—

TFIE MOST EAGERLY
AWAITED MUSICAL
EVENT OF THE
FALL SEASON

PLAN NOW TO ATTEND:

Wednesday, October 25, 1989
7:30 P.M.
Ford Auditorium

Honoring
IRWIN and BETHEA GREEN

who will be presented the very
prestigious Justice Louis D.
Brandeis Award

Featuring DAVID SYME, Concert
Pianist, in a special musical tribute.

FABULOUS STAR-STUDDED SHOW

DAVID (DUDU) FISHER

YAFFA YARKONI

Israel's newest superstar who starred in
the great Israeli version of Les Miserables
and recently performed a Royal Command
Performance in London.

Israel's 'Ambassador of
Song." A favorite of -
European and American
audiences.

MAX SOSIN will be master of ceremonies and
MACK PITT will be musical conductor.

FOR RESERVATIONS PHONE 569-1515

or write to the

ZIONIST CULTURAL CENTER

18451 West 10 Mile Road
Southfield, MI 48075
RABBI M. SYME, President Metro Detroit District
MILTON SHAPIRO, National President

18

FRIDAY, AUGUST 25, 1989

A New Immigrant
Looks At A New Life

Editor's note: Helen Elterman
is a 15-year-old immigrant
from the Soviet Union. Over
the coming months, Cipora
Cohen of the Jewish Welfare
Federation will report on
Helen's acculturation in
Detroit. The following letter
was written by Helen to a
friend in the Soviet Union.
Dear Natalie,
I write to you from a world
away, eight weeks after my
arrival in America.
As you know, my family left
the Soviet Union by train on
April 18 — destination Vien-
na, Austria. Representatives
from HIAS (Hebrew Im-
migrant Aid Society) met us
when we arrived. They gave
us food and an apartment.
Can you imagine, our tem-
porary home was nicer than
what we had in the Soviet
Union.
After a three-week stay in
Vienna, we went to Ladispoli,
Italy, for one month. It felt so
unreal to be living in those
cities.
I don't like to describe my
feelings as scared during this
time, but in a sense it's true.
Although I was free from the
Soviet Union, I was living in
a state of unknown for two
months. With each passing
day, I got more curious about
America.
We finally arrived in
Detroit on June 13. It was
great to see my Aunt Zina
and Uncle Sam and their two
children. They had lived in
Russia as refuseniks for eight
years before finally being
allowed to emigrate this past
January. I also met my
father's cousins who have
been living here for 10 years.
My first impression of
Detroit was, where are the
people? In the Soviet Union,
I was used to the streets
crowded with pedestrians.
Yet, here everyone has a car,
some even two or three.
It is hard to imagine the
times when we went from
store to store to find fish or
- meat -for-dinner --although I
know that's still reality for
you. Here, everything I want
is available in abundance.
You wouldn't believe the
fruits and vegetables we buy.
I wish I could send you some.
In Detroit, driver education
starts at age 15. That means
I can get my license to driVe
this year. I am really looking
forward to it.
Since it is the summer, I go
to a teen program at the
Jewish Community Center.
The day is divided between
computer classes and dance
lessons.

Helen Elterman

It seems foreign to me to
speak of a Jewish organiza-
tion, but there are so many
that offer programs to help us.
There is a Family-lb-Family
program which matches up
Soviet and American families
on a friendship basis. My
family met Dr. Martin Guyer
and his family this way. We
went to a Family-lb-Family
picnic with them and go to
concerts and dinner together.
At this time, my life is
ironic. I am living in the land
of freedom; yet, I feel more
trapped than I did before
because of the language and
culture barriers.
In the Soviet Union, I knew
my way around. I went with

It seems foreign to
me to speak of a
Jewish
organization, but
there are so many
that offer to help,

you and the others to movies
and museums. But, I realize
I have to give myself time to
feel more at home here.
Hopefully, once I start school,
I will make friends to get
together with.
Adjusting to a new life is
difficult for me but even
harder for my parents and
grandparents. My parents ap-
preciate America, but they
are not relaxed. My father's
unemployment puts a strain
on all of us. It helped when
my mother found a job as a
seamstress.
My grandparents are happy
to be with their children and
grandchildren and know they
are lucky to be living in this
country; but, they feel very
closed in. My grandfather is
a very educated man. He
loves to read and feels stunted

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