100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

August 25, 1989 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-08-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

UP FRON T

LAN

Miracle Worker

Continued from Page 5

INTRODUCES

1989

ITS
COLLECTION

FURS &
LEATHERS

OF

FOR MEN & WOMEN

LAKESIDE MALL
STERLING HEIGHTS

271 W. MAPLE
BIRMINGHAM

TWELVE OAKS MALL
NOVI

CROSSWINDS MALL
WEST BLOOMFIELD

FAIRLANE TOWN CENTER
DEARBORN

ANNETTE & COMPANY

School of Dance

announces its

10th ANNIVERSARY YEAR

Classes Begin September 5, 1989

REGISTER EARLY TO SECURE YOUR PLACE IN CLASS
TAP * JAll * BALLET * LOW-IMPACT AEROBICS

Pre-School thru Adult

Beginner thru Advanced

MORNING, AFTERNOON AND EVENING CLASSES

28857 Orchard Lake Road

(Between 12 & 13 Mile Road)
Farmington Hills

CALL NOW 553-0305

MARK'S

CLEANING AND TAILORING

32730 Northwestern Hwy.
Farmington Hills, Michigan 48018
737-0360

No tailor shop in West Bloomfield, Farmington Hills or any other
city can offer a service like this.

LET US BE YOUR TAILOR

16

FRIDAY, AUGUST 25, 1989

00- 11-E FAMILy
Sl_ IGGESTS THAT

MEMORIAL
CONTRIBL FT1ONS
BE MADE
I - TO TI--IF.
AMERICAN
S, CANCER
f SOCIETY 66

MDA to pay for it.

Undaunted, Lazar con-
tacted local businessmen and
asked them to sponsor booths.
Despite a rainstorm and a
shortage of volunteers, Lazar
collected more than $2,000.
"So naturally, this year he
wanted to do something big-
ger and better," recalled his
father. "He wanted rides. I
was adamant. I said absolute-
ly no way. So we're having
them."
After several months con-
tacting local businesses,
Lazar has completed most of
the planning. The owners of
the Crowne Pointe Office
Center at Lincoln and Green-
field have donated their park-
ing lot for the carnival, and
local businesses have donated
$3,000 — enough money for
carnival rides, a dunk tank, a
moon walk, several midway
games, food and drinks. In ad-
dition, Lazar has collected
$1,000 in direct contributions
by standing in front of the
Bread Basket Deli and Deli
Unique.
Planning the event was an
educational process for Jeff.
He had to make ar-
rangements with an in-

surance company, the police
department, the city council,
and a landlord in New York.
The only problem not yet
resolved is electricity.
"We're still trying to get a
generator," his father said.
At first, Lazar tried to get
a group of his friends involv-
ed. "In the beginning,
everybody was gung-ho about
it," he said. "Then it became,
`this is a lot of work — I'll see
you later.' "
Since then, it has been just
Lazar and his parents.
"We really need volunteers
18 years and older to work the
carnival," Lazar said.
Lazar and his parents hope
to raise $5,000. All physical-
ly and mentally handicapped
children are invited at no cost
to the event.
This year's carnival is not
even finished yet, and Lazar
is already planning the next
one. He is considering mak-
ing it a three-day event. "But
I'm going to run it a lot dif-
ferently," he adds. "I'm going
to try to recruit adult
volunteers to do a lot of the
work. It's just too much for
me and my parents to do
alone?' ❑

Flag-burning Decision
Gets Quiet Support

Washington — Ardor seems
to be cooling for a constitu-
tional amendment to prohibit
flag burning, and that
privately pleases a number of
Jewish activists who have
watched the emotion-charged
issue with unease.
The American Jewish Con-
gress applauded last month's
Supreme Court controversial
decision on flag burning and
is now considering open op-
position to the proposed con-
stitutional amendment.
Also, the National Jewish
Community Relations Ad-
visory Council recently sent a
letter to congressional leaders
urging a go-slow approach to
amending the Constitution.
Al Chernin, the group's ex-
ecutive vice-chairman, in-

dicated that NJCRAC does
see a Jewish stake in flag bur-
ning legislation, but said that
the group has not announced
a position on the actual
amendment.

The flag-burning frenzy has
put Jewish activists here in
an uncomfortable position.
"On one hand, it's our kind
of issue," said the Washington
representative of a major
Jewish organization.
"Whenever you talk about
tinkering with freedom of ex-
pression, Jews should get ner-
vous. On the other hand,
nobody wants to be out front
on this one; we have enough
problems without having our
patriotism challenged in the
midst of this flag hysteria."

Bill To Limit PLO
Talks May Reappear

Washington — The Helms
amendment, the recent at-
tempt to curtail the U.S.
dialogue with the Palestine
Liberation Organization, is
not quite dead after all.
Rep. Ed Feighan, D-Ohio,
has introduced a bill that
would restore some of the
tough language omitted from

the hard-fought Senate com-
promise, including the re-
quirement that the president
"certify" that PLO represen-
tatives involved in the talks
have not participated in any
terrorist activities resulting
in the death, injury or kid-
napping of an American
citizen.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan