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August 11, 1989 - Image 64

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-08-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I ENTERTAINMENT I

How to turn a paper plate
into a $19.95 dinner for two.

I■
It doesn't

I

Continued from preceding page



take any magic to
enjoy a great dinner offer in
I
Southfield. Just some into Mountain
/Jack's any Sunday through Friday.

For only $19.95, you can choose any
two dinner entrees up to a regular price of $13.95 X
i each. That's a savings of nearly $8.00. Every entree
comes with a salad bar brought right to your table.
A cup of home-stsyle soup. Delicious warm bread. And your
choice of home-style soup. Delicious warm bread. And
. your choice of baked potato, red skin potatoes or rice
pilaf.
All you have to do is clip the coupon and pre-
sent it to your server. Then watch your paper plate
turn into a delightful dinner for two. Because
/
at Mountain Jack's we bring more to the
X
table. And from now until Sept. 1,
I
\
1989 we'll be bringing it to you
- JN
for less.

I



This offer may not be used in conjuncttion with any
other promotional offers or redeemed for cash.
oo.
Does not include tab or gratuity.
aiito

So

aloft

MAINTAIN

CK'S

VIM MN.

# 4.

I/0

26885 Greenfield, South of 11 Mile
Southfield • 557-0570

GOOD ONLY AT OUR
- -SOUTHFIELD LOCATION

PRIME RIB • CHOICE STEAKS

I

COMPARE ANYWHERE! . . . IF YOU WANT THE BEST

I DINE IN & CARRY-OUT AVAILABLE

RIBS

SEAFOOD

CHICKEN
RIBS &
SHRIMP
WE
DO
BEST!

GIVE US A TEST!

I OPEN 7 DAYS—SUNAHURS IMO

ASTED

FRI.-SAT. 11.11 I

118 SOUTH WOODWARD • ROYAL OAK

JUST NOW01 OF 10 MILE NEXT TO ZOO

544-1211

QUALITY AND CONSISTENCY IS OUR PRIORITY!

COU PON EXP IR ES 8- 18-89

Try our fast lunches-$5 and under.

Let's Meet at

Banquet
Facilities

Entertainment
7 Nights
Italian-American Dining At Its Finest

DETROIT

You're At
The Head
Of The Class

Mon.-Fri, 11 to 11, Sat. 4 to 12 Mid., Sun. 2 to 11
4222 Second Blvd.
Valet
Bet. Willis & Canfield
Parking
833-9425

FREE DINNER

EQUAL OR LESSER VALUE
WITH PURCHASE OF ANY
THREE DINNERS

I FREE SODA POP FOR CHILDREN

WE ONLY USE
VEGETABLE OIL IN
ALL OUR COOKING,
INCLUDING FRIED
FOODS

NO MSG ON REQUEST

WING HONG
569.5527

FREE OFFER GOOD ONLY AT SOUTHFIELD LOCATION

18203 W. 10 Mile Rd. at Southfield Rd. •

Visit Our Farmington Hills Restaurant, 14 Mile & Northwestern, 851.7400

64

FRIDAY, AUGUST 11, 1989

With a Subscription
To The Jewish News

Call: 354-6060

THE JEWISH NEWS

realize what he was saying.
It's like anyone else who
pioneers a concept. For many
years, Don Rickles used to get
punched in the face after
every show. People waited
outside for him because they
couldn't take the insults.
Once it became established
that this was his comedy
routine, people asked to be
picked on. So when people
realized I was talking like
that deliberately, it became
hysterical."
Looking back, Crosby says
the most rewarding part of his
entire career has been his
ability to sustain it. "I see
these new guys come along
with their new ideas, this new
trend of comedy that's in
vogue right now with the dirt,
the filth and the vulgarity,
each one trying to outdo the
other by seeing who can be
the most lewd and the most
obnoxious.
"I've seen a lot of trends
during my career," he con-
tinues, "but to still be produc-
tive, busy, in demand and still
working is the most fulfilling
of all. I've seen countless
thousands of these new kids
come and go. But if you're do-
ing something that's real,
something that people can ac-
cept and identify with, then
you have a career. You can
stay in the business. If not,
then you may come in with a
flash but, just as quickly,
you're out."
Crosby is married to a
former Radio City RoCkette
and is the father of two
boys — Daniel, 19, and An-
drew, 15. It may have been at
Andrew's bar mitzvah that
Crosby first noticed a growing
phenomenon.
"Did you ever notice that
the comics are Jews and the
singers are Italian? That's
just the way it seems to work
out. All my pals were at An-
drew's bar mitzvah: Jackie
Gayle and Shecky Green, Red
Buttons, Jack Carter, Jan
Murray. Jerry Vale got up to
sing. Think of all the great
singers — Al Martino, Sergio
Franchi, Frank Sinatra, Dean
Martin, Vic Damone. They're
all Italian. But the comics,
from Myron Cohen, Henny
Youngman, Milton Berle,
Buddy Hackett. All the great
comics are Jewish. Nobody
understands why. It just hap-
pened that way."
Is it something in the
genes?
"No, we didn't wear jeans in
those days," Crosby quips.
"We wore tuxedos. But
anyway, laughter is a great
weapon; a great way to over-
come things. It's a marvelous
thing to have a sense of
humor. I feel sympathy for
people who can't laugh.

Sometimes during my act I
see people who are absolute-
ly hysterical. Then I look
down and see a woman sitting
with her arms folded. But
rather than feeling offended,
I feel bad for people who don't
know how to laugh, don't
know how to enjoy. It's a
misery." -
In addition to his profes-
sional pursuits, Crosby also
spends a great deal of time in
charitable work. Because of
his_hearing affliction he has
a special interest in problems
of the hearing impaired and
has served as honorary chair-
man for the Better Hearing
Institute in Washington, D.C.
He is also a trustee for the
Hope for Hearing Foundation
at U.C.L.A. He has raised con-
siderable money for both
organizations.
In addition, Crosby was
recently named national co-
host for the Jerry Lewis
Muscular Dystrophy Tele-

feel bad for
people who don't
know how to
laugh, don't know
how to enjoy.

thon. He's also been a heavy
fund raiser and tireless
worker for the City of Hope,
the internationally famous
hospital and medical research
facility in Duarte, Calif. As a
result, some years ago he was
named its International Am-
bassador of Good Will.
He's been "roasted" by
the Friars Club in New York
and California, and honored
by the Eddie Cantor Chari-
table Foundation with its
coveted "Susie" award. In
recognition of his achieve-
ments, both in comedy and as
a humanitarian, the Holly-
wood Chamber of Commerce
installed the Norm Crosby
"star" in Hollywood's Walk of
Fame in 1982.
"Doing charity work is just
my way of giving back a lit-
tle bit," Crosby says. "I can't
imagine any other industry
that would be as rewarding.
I've been able to live a good
life, take care of my family,
retire my dad. I've had
tremendous success material-
ly from the business; far, far
beyond what I ever dreamed
of in the early days. Most per-
formers feel the same way I
do. All of us who go out and
do all these benefits and
telethons and fund-raisers.
It's our way of giving back, a
way of saying thank you, for
showing our appreciation for
all the things we've been able
to enjoy."

alb

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