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August 04, 1989 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-08-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

NEWS

ss.,„`" s:

:‘,

The Kidnapping

Continued from preceding page

on trial. Mrs. Thatcher's
government sent assassins to
Gibraltar last year, where
they gunned down two IRA
Figures.
There have been cheers for
Israel's action, as well.
Moslem fundamentalists are
not among the world's most
sympathetic or popular
figures, and the latest threats

against the hapless Western
hostages have not helped to
improve the image of the
Moslem Revolution.
More Israeli actions like the
snatching of the Hezbollah
sheik are likely in the coming
weeks, not to win applause
from anybody, but to retard
the efforts of the interna-
tional terror network.

1 LOCAL NEWS

20 Years Later, Ulpan
Members Still Dedicated

ADRIEN CHANDLER

Special to The Jewish News

Save $314. Contemporary Custom Sofa comes in 62", 77"
and 87" lengths. Sleeper versions also on sale.. Sofa lists for
$1013. Now sale-priced in select fabrics from only $699.

eally, how can anything
better than a Newton custom
sofas, sectionals, sleepers or
chairs? Especially during this sale.
It's so simple. Choose a style.
Select a fabric. It's yours in 30
working days. Complete with
exclusive fabric warranty and
lifetime guarantee on the frame,
springs, and cushions.
And yes, they are on sale. But
hurry. Because, like most things in
life, the good things never last long.
At these prices...well, come in today.

Furniture So Good,
Its Guaranteed.

Livonia: On Middlebelt, between 5 & 6 Mile: 525-0030 • Sterling Heights: On Van Dyke, between 16 & 17
Mile: 264-3400 • Novi: On the 12 Oaks Mall Service Drive, next to Comerica Bank: 349-4600 •
Opening Soon in Ann Arbor: On Eisenhower and Ann Arbot-Saline Road, in the Colonnade Plaza •
Open Mon-Sat, 10-9 • Sunday 12-5 • Use your MasterCard, Visa, or our Convenient Terms

0 1989. Newton

l\/14C)ED,N.



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Void on prior purchases or orders in process.

IF YOU WANT ITALIAN LEATHER, SPEAK
TO THE ITALIANS AT MODA FURNISHINGS.

1952 Telegraph, N. of Square Lake Road
332-7283
Bloomfield Design Plaza

18

FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 1989

executive custom
shirtmakers inc.

642-0460

207 S. Woodward • Birmingham

(Next to the Birmingham Theatre)

Mon.-FrI. 9:30-6 Sat. 9:30-5
CLOSED MONDAYS IN AUGUST

WC, Visa. Am. Exp.

Validated Parking

T

he year was 1969, and
an enthusiastic group
of Jewish teenagers
could hardly wait for the sum-
mer. This would not be an or-
dinary school vacation for
16-year-old Cheryl Kovsky
and her new group of friends.
They would be spending two
months studying and travel-
ing in Israel, based at the
Haifa Technion, learning the
land, the language and the
people in the company of
Israeli teenagers and com-
municating only in Hebrew.
Kovsky, now Cheryl Litt,
was part of the Summer
Youth Ulpan, a program at
the old Jewish Community
Center at Meyers and Curtis
that provided intensive
Hebrew training for 35 local
junior and senior high school
students, and then sent them
to Israel.
"We came from all walks of
Judaism," Litt says. "I
couldn't speak a word of
Hebrew." The training stuck;
Litt, still fluent, teaches
Hebrew to adults in her spare
time.
Twenty years later, a small
group of those original ulpan
members were sitting in the
living room of Litt's South-
field home last week,
reminiscing about their ex-
periences, flipping through
mementoes and old photo-
graphs, still feeling the bond
of kinship and camaraderie
they had developed during
their intensive two-year
training. It was an experience
all agreed was life-shaping.
Six of the 19 who actually
made the trip to Israel that
summer still live in Detroit.
Others are scattered to the
four corners. About 25 per-
cent made aliyah. They are
doctors, lawyers, scientists
and teachers, mothers and
fathers, committed Jews.
"These are my jewels," says
Irwin Shaw, former director of
the JCC, and the man who

organized the ulpan program.
"The Jewish community,
through the JCC and through
Irwin Shaw's program made
an investment in us," says
Howard Sherizen, 37, a finan-
cial planner from Oak Park.
"I hope the investment is pay-
ing off."
Litt, an attorney, takes
pride in what the group
members have accomplished
and how they have remained
in contact over the years. "It
was a commitment, and a
financial one, too, on the part
of the Jewish community. It
was a good 14-month involve-
ment. I thing your dividends
are extensive. We all really
developed our potential."
"I think it's wonderful that
we all have such a love for the
Jewish community," adds
Julie Kimmel Solomon, 38, a
librarian who lives in Novi.
Her husband, Jerry, was also
an ulpan member. "We all
feel an importance to keep it
alive and that our children
will be enriched."
Elaine Kolton Rosenblum,
a 35-year-uld hospital ad-
ministrator from Southfield,
echoes those sentiments.
"Now that I have kids, I want
to incorporate that whole feel-
ing of Judaism, the language
and the love of Israel for my
kids, because it became so im-
portant for me. I want it to be
a natural part of their lives."
Each participant was drawn
to the program for his own
reasons. "I wanted to study
about Judaism," Litt recalls.
"I had written to Hebrew
Union College, when I was
only in the ninth grade. I said
I was interested in studying
there and what did they
recommend. They wrote back:
`Study as much Hebrew as
you can.'
"I think my mom came
across the ulpan. I was in-
terested strictly in the
Hebrew part of it. I got their
little pamphlet and I said,
`OK, this scunds really great.
I am going to learn Hebrew.'

Continued or ?age 20

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