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July 21, 1989 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-07-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I OPINION

THE UNBEATABLE DEALER • THE UNBEATABLE DEALER,

TEL-12 DEALERS

Jewish Elderly

Continued from Page 7

TENT
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140 lifflittittfit
AT
THE
TEL-12
MALL
Look For The Big Tent On Telegraph

JULY 20, 21, 22

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ON THE SPOT
DELI VERY!!

FINANCING

11Z:M31110

as low as

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ONO%r sit s

REBATES
as high as

$2500

Bring Your Title,
Payment Book...
We're Dealing!!

6000

CARS * TRUCKS * VANS
AVAILABLE AT THE
TEL-12 MALL
FOR
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY

Remember .. .
when the Tel-12

CO

PRICES ARE,
DOWN
DOWN,

OPEN

DOWN!!!

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FREE

—4

REFRESHMENTS

02
r-

Dealer

CHEVROLET'S
HIGHEST AWARD FOR
CUSTOMER STATISFACTION

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TELEGRAPH At 12 MILE & 1-696 •

10 FRIDAY, JULY 21, 1989

355-1000

Planners might think in
terms of finding the proper
balance between nonsec-
tarian or government services
and Jewish services that will
meet the needs of contem-
porary clients without un-
necessary fragmentation or
duplication of efforts.
Research has shown that
people do not "get religion" in
their later years if they have
not been sensitized to it in
their formative years.
The generation of the new
Jewish elderly was raised
with a strong sense of ethnic
identification; the generation
of younger Jewish leaders and
professionals are increasing-
ly oriented towards religious
self-identity and expression.
This has already led to ten-
sion between service-
providers and clients over the
degree of "Jewishness" that
should be incorporated into
Jewish services and
institutions.
For those elderly who have
had an upbringing rich in
Jewish tradition and learn-
ing, however, it is clearly a
major force later in life, when
the ability to participate in
ritual and religious activity
becomes an important source
of empowerment and
self-esteem.
Our tradition teaches us to
"rise before the aged and
show deference to the old."
(Leviticus 19:32). We must
now begin to find ways to ex-
press that honor to a new
generation of Jewish elderly
with different strengths and
different needs. ❑

m

Dealers Tents are up,

Thurs. & Fri. 9 a.m.-9 p.m.
Saturday 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

Geo

on
select
models

for federal legislation that
will offer all elderly
Americans appropriate sup-
port and assistance.
Priority issues include the
need for national health in-
surance and catastrophic and
long-term health care, with
attention to the related pro-
blems of cost and personnel.
The elderly also need affor-
dable housing, opportunities
for continued employment or
training for new employment,
and changes in the Social
Security system to encourage
incentives toward work.
Joan Fuld of the Council of
Jewish Federations asserts
that the elderly must be
brought as equal partners in-
to the planning process.
Jewish communal policies
and programs must take into
account the extent to which
the elderly prefer to have
their concerns and activities
"mainstreamed" into the
larger communal agenda
rather than treated
separately.
Also to be considered are
the appropriate roles to be
played by agencies, family
members and the elderly
themselves in implementing
these policies and programs.
While the new Jewish
elderly are concerned with
such issues as housing,
employment opportunities,
transportation, and retire-
ment and relocation counsel-
ing, they would also like to
have these issues dealt with,
to a degree, in the context of
specifically Jewish services
and institutions.

NEWS 1

Auschwitz Protesters
Attacked At Convent

New York (JTA) — An
assault on seven American
Jews demonstrating last
week at the Carmelite con-
vent at Auschwitz has shock-
ed and deeply disturbed the
Jewish community.
The demonstrators, led by
Rabbi Avraham Weiss of the
Riverdale section of the
Bronx, were drenched with
water and then beaten by
workers as they were dragg-
ed off the grounds of the con-
vent, which lies on the
perimeter of the site of the
Auschwitz death camp in
Poland.
The demonstrators had
climbed over a fence and on-
to the convent's porch, in an
effort, they told reporters, to
talk to the nuns, who have
shirked international
demands to leave the
premises.
As he was being dragged

off, Weiss shouted, "Nazi
Poles, anti-Semites," at the
convent workers.
Five police officers, a priest
and about 20 others did not
intervene as the Jews were
punched and kicked by the
workers for 20 minutes, accor-
ding to reports from Poland.
"Rip off their skullcaps,
drag them out," a Polish stu-
dent priest was quoted as
shouting as he watched the
struggle.
A protest against the attack
has been filed at the Polish
Embassy in the United States
by Kalman Sultanik, vice
president of the World Jewish
Congress and president of the
Federation of Polish Jews.
The incident was the latest
in the ongoing battle over the
5-year-old Auschwitz convent,
which many Jews consider a
desecration.

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