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July 07, 1989 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-07-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I FOCUS imm"I'm

Newton.

Custom-covered hand-crafted sofas.
Now at discount prices.

Making It

Continued from preceding page

11111111111111

Update your own purse
with a
beaded shoulder strap.

• bead repair & new linings
• custom designs
• vintage frames
• antique beaded, leather
& tapestry

Right now, our custom sofas are
discount-priced from $595-$1,295.

Choose the look, length, style and
fabric that's right for you.

A Newton sofa is something special. It's your chance to get exactly what you want.
Come in and choose from hundreds of styles—including chairs, sectionals, and
sleepers (with inner-spring mattress). Select from thousands of fabrics. We'll
custom-build and deliver it in only 30 working days.
We say it's the only way to get the perfect piece. And now during our pre-Spring
Sale, at the perfect price.

Now consider
Newton's extras:

• You choose from over
1,200 designer fabrics
• You select from 457
styles
• An exclusive wear-
tested fabric warranty
• Lifetime guarantee on
the frame, springs &
cushions
• Delivery in only 30

working days

Purses of exceptional
beauty & quality
yours exclusively
from

cal
dPISIRMIS

by appointment

646-6146

Custom contemporary, traditional and country
sofas are now sale-priced from only $595.

Furniture So Good
It's Guaranteed.

Livonia

On Middlebelt.
bete. 5 8: 6 Mile
525-0030

Novi

12 Oaks Mall Service Drive.
Opposite Hudson\ Entrance

349-4600

Sterling Heights

On Van Dyke.
betw. 16 & 17 Nlile
264-3400

Hours: Mon.-Sat. 1(1-9
Sunday 12-5
MasterCard, Visa,
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Oriental Rugs
Today's Pleasure
Tomorrow's Treasure

251 Merrill
Birmingham
(313) 644-7311

2915 Breton
Grand Rapids
(1.800-622-RUGS)

N

CONGRATULATIONS

Dr. Ronald Gold

Fine Catering
Flowers, Decor
Table Settings
Complete Planning

on the opening of:

WALLED LAKE
CHIROPRACTIC CENTER

1266 SOUTH COMMERCE ROAD

WALLED LAKE, MI

669-8080

18

FRIDAY, JULY 7, 1989

FLOREEN HALPERN

A

353.8985

DAVID ROSENMAN'S

ALTO
AIM PURCHASERS

NEW & USED CAR BROKER

(313) 851-CARS
(313) 851-2277

predecessors had faced — and
faced them alone.
According to May Abrams,
wife of outfielder Cal Abrams
(who played with Brooklyn,
Cincinnati, Pittsburgh,
Baltimore and the Chicago
White Sox) it was tougher for
Jews than for blacks.
"When they saw the blacks
coming in — and the blacks
were coming in droves — it
was a big money-making
time when hockey
defenseman Larry Zeidel (of
Detroit, Chicago and
Philadelphia) went after a
Boston Bruin with his stick
swinging, after the other man
called out from the bench:
"You're next for the ovens,
Zeidel."
The late Max Zaslofsky, a
four-time All Star with the
basketball Knicks,
remembers when he played in
the early days of the National
Basketball Association.
"You never had too many
Jewish ball players," he said,
"and the thing that made me
a little prouder was the fact
that I was Jewish, and that I
was more or less blazing a
trail for future Jewish
players. I was proud that I
was a Jew playing basketball
and probably one of three in
the game at that time."
Dick Savitt, the only Jew to
win the men's singles title in
tennis at Wimbledon, in
1951, talked about the fact
that most Jewish athletes are
remembered no so much as
record-breaking athletes who
happened to be Jewish, but
rather as Jews who happened
to be athletes.
"If I wasn't Jewish, and just
did what I did, I'd have been
no big deal," he said. "By be-
ing Jewish, and having won
at Wimbledon, and in
Australia and a few other
things, I was unusual."
For many of the players, it
was this sense of being
"unusual" that gave them a
greater sense of Jewish iden-
tity, and a greater drive as
athletes.
As Abrams said: "I knew I
was Jewish, and I knew I
stood out, and I also knew I
had to be twice as good as my
opponents. If the Jew wasn't
twice as good, he was nothing.
If he was equal to them, he
was still nothing. I felt I had
to produce more; I had to do
more. I had to try, and try, and
try, and never give up. Never
give up. And that's what I
did." ❑

Elli.Wohlgeternter is
managing editor of the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency.
This article originally
appeared in Present Tense
magazine. (c) Jewish
Telegraphic Agency

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