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June 30, 1989 - Image 70

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-06-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I ENTERTAINMENT

oese4oescsoeeeseesowisasioolliNl0004sloowce444

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Celebrating Our 27th Anniversary

O
O

O

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Presents

e

O

JACK'S ORIGINAL

O

ODO SALE

BUY ONE lb. CORNED BEEF AT REGULAR PRICE OF $ 7"
GET A SECOND POUND FOR ONE CENT

O

4 lb. Maximum Purchase

O

TUESDAY, JULY 4th ONLY

O

O
O

Hours For The July 4 Holiday

10 am, to 6 p.m. . . Carry-Out
10 am. to 3 p.m. . . Dining Room

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O

o

6873 Orchard Lake Road

West Bloomfield

O

c)

855-6622

:41 00 , 41344141 , 4401.4 , 44442444441) . ,0)(setsose

Business Luncheon Specials

$3 85
FIESTA ALLA TERRACE

Beginning at

CHEF NELSON'S ITALIAN MEDLEY

SALAD

PASTA
APPETIZER
ENTREE
DESSERT

Antipasto Garden Salad With Italian
Vinaigrette Dressing
Linguini with Special Marinara Sauce
Prosciutto With Fresh Melon
Veal Nelson
Homemade Spumoni with Rum & Brandy

$ 18 95 per person

SUAVE

851-4094

titt Taimmi 44 01146

1128 E. 9 MILE RD., 1/2 Mile East of 1-75 • 541-2132

Invites You To

Enjoy Dinner
In A Warm, Friendly Atmosphere
Choice Meats and
Fresh Fish Daily

EARLY EVENING SPECIALS
MON.-FRI. 4 TO 6 PM
$7.25-$9.50

58

ALL FRESH FRUIT PIES,
APPLE STREUDEL,
COGNAC TORTES

FRIDAY, JUNE 30, 1989

Yards and Yards
of BRUNCH

Each Sunday 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

$1 3 95

per person

$795

Children 12 and under

Reservations Suggested

12 Mile and Orchard Lake Road • Farm. Hills

I

Spock

Continued from preceding page

O
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A Restaurant
Delicatessen

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O

J

ALMA SMITH
Songstress & Pianist
Downstairs SAT. 6:30 to 10:30 p.m.

Private Parties up to 200

355•2050

EMBASSY

wommomplim.

SUITES

HOTEL

28100 Franklin Road
Southfield

movie, starring Diane Keaton
as a single parent who loses
custody of her child in court
to her ex-husband because
she will not evict her live-in
lover, quickly fizzled at the
box office. Nimoy felt the
movie should have been
carefully guided to the
marketplace. Instead, the
studio decided to "toss it out
into several hundred theaters
. . . It's a somewhat unusual
film. You're looking for au-
dience reaction to build
gradually.
But the intellectually
curious Nimoy learned much
from the audience reaction
that the film received. "I set
out to make the picture in a
way which would give an au-
dience an opportunity to res-
pond to it based on their own
prejudices and I think that
that is still operative. I think
the picture is kind of a
Rorschach test and it has to
do with each individual
member of the audiences'
feelings about what is proper
.. what is morally right,
what is morally wrong . . . in
raising children and making
decisions about parenthood."
Unlike his Mr. Spock
character, Nimoy is not
unemotional. The filming of
The Good Mother was a par-
ticularly emotional time for
Nimoy. He was directing an
intense, emotional film short-
ly after the death of both of
his parents and the breakup
of his marriage.
"During the making of The
Good Mother, I woke up one
night in tears and grabbed for
a piece of paper and pencil
and I wrote down three words,
`It's about loss.' And I had
gone through some very per-
sonal losses around that time,
not long before that, and I
suddenly realized that that
was what the film was put-
ting me in touch with, was
my own sense of loss. It was
a very moving experience."
He adds, "I am deeply af-
fected by each movie I make.
By the time that picture's
finished I'm a different per-
son."

As a director, Nimoy's emo-
tions are affected by the mood
of the film as a whole. As an
actor, they are affected by his
character. "I tend to
assimilate the condition that
I'm dealing with. It tends to
become a part of me. I live
with it . . . I'm in a much bet-
ter mood when I'm doing com-
edy than I am when I'm doing
tragedy. When I was making
the Star Trek series, we went
many months at a time . . . I
was conscious of the fact that
on Saturdays I would still be
in the Spock mode, on a day
off! Sunday afternoon I would
start to relax a little, get a lit-

tle loose. But on Saturday I
was still quite rigid and I was
still doing Spock, in my per-
sonal ife."
Nimoy's Orthodox Jewish
background left its mark on
"Star Trek." In its second
series, the show travelled to
Vulcan, and Nimoy "in-
vented" the Vulcan hand
salute, raising his palm and
using a "V" separation bet-
ween his second and third
fingers, with the thumb ex-
tended. The sign, of course, is
the Hebrew letter "shin" and
is used on major Jewish
holidays and festivals during
the priestly blessings.
Nimoy was a television,
film and stage actor prior to
the "Star Trek" series. After

am deeply
affected by each
movie I make. By
the time that
picture is finished
I'm a different
person.

the show was cancelled in
1969, he remained on the
same studio lot and did two
years on the TV series "Mis-
sion: Impossible." He left the
show on his own and did
mostly stage work before
"Star Trek" was reborn.
A son of Russian im-
migrants, Nimoy played
Tevye in Fiddler on the Roof
as well as Goldman in The
Man in the Glass Booth, a
play which deals with the
Holocaust. Among his other
1970s stage roles were King
Arthur, in the musical
Camelot, McMurphy in One
Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest,
as well as Sherlock Holmes,
the brilliant, singleminded
and unemotional detective
who is frequently compared
to Spock.
Just as Nimoy today seems
comfortable with the
character of Spock, the
Vulcan would undoubtedly
approve of director Nimoy's
integrity. He was offered the
chance to direct the acclaim-
ed film Mississippi Burning.
but turned it down because he
felt it was unfaithful to the
true civil rights struggle
because the film showed
white people and the FBI sav-
ing the day. "That's not what
the Civil Rights movement
was all about," he says, ad-
ding, "Mississippi Burning,
was a big distortion. The pic-
ture was offered to me and I
couldn't do it."
For similar reasons, he "did
not like" the television
miniseries
Holocaust,
although he sees two sides to
the issue.
"I thought it trivialized; I

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