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June 30, 1989 - Image 54

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-06-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

COOKING

I

COUPON

ERICAN

SAVE

SUMMERY
SUGA•REE
ICE CREAM

BULK 1100D

VALUAB COU N

ON=

8 Oz. Serving

Choice of Flavors
Limit 2 Cups Per Customer

M&M CANDIES
$1.99 lb.
I

GOOD
ONLY AT
WEST BLOOMFIELD
STORE

11 1

6917 ORCHARD LAKE RD.
West Bloomfield Plaza

8 . 30 a.m.-9:30 p.m
Sun. 9 a.m.-6 p.m.

Limit 2 lbs. With Additional Purchase

rL

s

WA LN T

$ 1.99

Limit 2 lbs.

lb.

• MOUSSE • PUMPKIN PIE • CHEESECAKE
• SHORTCAKE • CREME ROLLS
• JELLY ROLLS • BROWNIES

30` OFF

. 1

JN

Expires 7-14-89

y.

VI ALUABLE COUPON

SUCROSE-FREE

I I

Halves & Pieces

With This American
Bulk Food Coupon
Expires 7-14-89 JN

Expires 7-14-89 j

ONE COUPON PER FAMILY

VALUABLE

30c OFF

REG. PRICE
Limit 3 Expires 7-14-89 JN

AMERICAN BULK FOOD COUPON

VALUABLE COUPON MN MN NI\ OINIIII VALUABLE COUPON

LONG GRAIN 1
BROWN RICE I

r -OATS

• QUICK
• ROLLED

39j $1

JN

Limit 2 lbs. • Ex pires 7-14-89

AMERICAN BULK FOOD COUPON

AMERICAN BULK FOOD COUPON

FRESH IN SHELL

99#

PEANUTS

• Plain • Salted

FINE GRANULATED

SUGAR 33* lb.

lb.

FRESH BAKED 1

COUPON

I—CO UP ON-7

GROUND

MUFFINS

INNAMON
„,® 1CY oz.

• OAT BRAN • SUGAR-FREE
• LARGE VARIETY OF
FLAVORS

BUY 3 — GET ONE

FREE

American
Bulk
Food

JN

Limit 3 Free • Expires 7-14-89

vs)

411

■ 111111111.11•11111

Your Spectacular Weekend
Includes

$4.9911,

Shell-On

Exp. 7-8-89
-1

COCKTAIL SHRIMP

26.30

ct. $ 7.99 lb. Exp. 7-8-89j

Fresh Applewood Smoked Seafood
featuring

t —

Departures Every Saturday
From
Detroit

Only$679 0 °

*(double occupancy)

Phone for Brochure

tf2

toe

Tei

0

I-

t-r) SUPERIOR FISH CO.

House of Quality

11 Mile
Serving Metropolitan Detroit for Over 40 Years

309 E. 11 Mile Rd., Royal Oak, MI • 541-4632

54

Round Trip Flight to Phoenix
2 Nights in Scottsdale
1 Night at Grand Canyon
Breakfast and Dinner Each Day
Spectacular Sightseeing

Don't miss this exciting chance to see
the Grand Canyon.
"The one great sight which every
American should
TEDDY ROOSEVELT

SMOKED SABLE, WHITE FISH,
SALMON, etc.

b k000,

)







Fresh Daily — Homemade

SEAFOOD SALAD

JN

../..""Ikt DAYS -3 NIGHTS

Cool off with the
Seafood treats

I-

Expires 7-14-89

Limit 8 ozs.

SUPERIOR
FISH CO.

E

9411).

Limit 2 lbs. • Expires 7-14-89 JN

FRIDAY, JUNE 30, 1989

Parking in rear

Mon.-Wed. 8-5
Thurs. & Fri. 8-6
Saturday 8-1

■ IGEMINI TRAVEL

Orchard Mall

6393 Orchard Lake Rd. • West Bloomfield

855-3600

The Grand American
July 4th Barbeque

ETHEL G. HOFMAN

Special to The Jewish News

T

he 4th of July is one
of the most popular
American holidays. It
is a celebration of freedom
and fun. And since we're well
into summer, good eating will
be centered around a full-
scale barbecue worthy of this
Independence Day.
Cooking food on a barbeque
is nothing new — in fact, it's
the most ancient form of mak-
ing raw food more palatable.
There are several theories
surrounding the word. The
French insist that it comes
from an animal being spitted
from whiskers to tail, "de la
barbe a la queue." Closer to
home, we find that "Bar-
bacoa" is the name of a
wooden frame on which the
Mexican Indians smoked and
cooked their meat.
Family and community
barbeques, a vibrant part of
Americana, are associated
with hot dogs, hamburgers,
steaks and chicken, but it's
the spicy sauces that give
each food its special
character. Since it's mid-
summer, we have available
the best of local fruits and
vegetables.
To celebrate this summer-
time culinary tradition, here's
a rundown of equipment, and
a menu that will keep
everybody, including the
cook, happy. None of the
dishes are complicated, but
there are a few unique
touches to make each dish
your own.
Essential Equipment: No
need to have the newest and
fanciest, though they're nice
to own.
• Grills come in a range of
sizes, shapes and styles. You
may want to purchase two —
a small, portable one and
another for backyard feasting.
A round portable brazier is
the simplest and least expen-
sive uncovered grill on the
market. Great for hot dogs
and hamburgers; not the best
choice for roasts, whole birds
or thick pieces of meat, but a
foil tent used as a cover can
help.
Covered kettles are the
most popular covered grills
sold today. The cover turns
the grill into an oven, and the
circulating hot air cooks the
food.
• Fuel is either charcoal, gas
or aromatic woods, depending
on taste and needs (Henry
Ford invented charcoal bri-
quets as a by-product of his
wood-sided model T cars).

• Long-handled tongs. Two
sets to turn food and handle
coals. Scissor-type are easiest
to use.
• Long-handled fork and
broad spatula — all utensils
should have wood or in-
sulated handles.
• Heavy cooking mitts, ex-
tra long to protect hands from
heat.
• Long-handled basting
brush to apply sauces and
marinades.
ther-
• Rapid-response
mometer for cooking meats.
• Drip pan to catch and hold
juices to be used for basting.
• Spritzer bottle filled with
water for flare-ups.
'Heavy foil to line grill and
charcoal starter.
• Wire brush for cleaning.
Safe Barbeque: The first
step for a cookout should be
safety.
• All barbequing should be
done outdoors. Don't barbe-
que in the garage, even in a

rainstorm — there's always
the chance of the fire igniting
something outside the grill.
• Make sure a commercially
prepared starter fluid — not
gasoline, alcohol or other
highly flammable fluids — is
used to avoid an accidental
explosion.

Sauces and Marinades:

The most popular sauces are
tomato-based using catsup,
tomato or chili sauce. Used for
basting, dipping and table
sauces, they add color and
flavor to food "crusts." To pre-
vent burning, brush sauces on
meats 10 to 15 minutes before
removing from grill.
Marinades, usually an oil
base plus an acid such as
wine, vinegar or lemon juice,
heighten flavor and tenderize.
For best results, marinate in
refrigerator overnight.
Note: In menu below,
recipes serve 8 and are given
for starred items only.

GRAND AMERICAN
BARBEQUE
* Oversize Burgers, All
American Barbeque
Sauce. Mayonnaise,
mustard, thick-sliced
tomatoes, thin-sliced

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