100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

June 30, 1989 - Image 135

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-06-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

awager**;orMR01.04.04maisoc;rawai/tor-•

Each month in this space,
L'Chayim will look back into issues
of The Jewish News to see what
was happening in the local Jewish
community or in the Diaspora 10, 20
and 40 years ago.

TEN YEARS AGO

Netherlands Queen Juliana and
Otto Frank, 90-year-old father of
Anne Frank, made a special
pilgrimage on what would have
been Anne Frank's 50th birthday, to
the building where he, his family

s

6,

and four other Jews spent two years
hiding from the Nazis.
A proposal for the construction
of a Holocaust Memorial Center as
a wing of the Jewish Community
Center at Maple and Drake Roads
was approved.

20 YEARS AGO

The Financial Times reported
that Israel was the largest single
market for West German goods in
the Middle East.
Sol King was elected president

of the Engineering Society of
Detroit.

40 YEARS AGO

Ben Paul Brasley, prominent
Pittsburgh attorney and communal
leader, donated $50,000 to the
building fund of the B'nai B'rith
Hillel Foundation at the University of
Michigan.
The first immigrant to the State
of Israel from the Soviet Union was
Sophie Garfinkel, 76, who moved
with her daughters to Kfar Gileadi.

Kids Bored? Let Them Research Family Tree

By MIRIAM WEINER

One of the best summer
projects for your children which is
guaranteed to keep them busy is to
introduce them to their family
history. The project can include the
creation of a family tree, interviews
with relatives and perhaps a trip to
the old neighborhoods where their
parents or grandparents once lived
as children.
What can children learn from
exploring their family history besides
the obvious connections to their
ancestors — a little history, some
geography, perhaps a few words of
a foreign language (Yiddish might
really turn them on), but most
important, a strengthening of their
Jewish identity with the special
bonding to their past generated by
the creation of their own family tree.
One book which may be useful
is Children of Our Children by
Helene Daniel, Augusta Feller
(Winston-Derek Publishers, Inc.)

The easy-to-use format of this
book begins with the immigrant
generation, providing space to fill in
names, dates and places. Various
holidays are described with room to
write down family recipes and
holiday traditions. The next part of
the book talks about religious
training with space to record'
religious ceremonies and insert
bar/bat mitzvah photos.
There is even a section entitled
"The Healer" which talks about
Grandma's chicken soup.
The book continues into the
courtship years of the parents, how
they spent vacations, and the
changing times through life cycle
events including weddings and
deaths.
A special section entitled
"Honor Your Name" talks about the
importance of each person's name
and provides space for Hebrew
name and the person named after.
There are special sections on the
Holocaust, Israel, the family service

record, yahrzeit records, always with
space for handwritten notes,
memories and photographs.
The well-illustrated volume
concludes with space for both the
father's and mother's family trees
and a glossary.
In My Generations: A Course in
Jewish Family History (Behrman
House), Arthur Kurzweil has
interposed Jewish history and
tradition throughout the many
personal illustrations of his own
family history. Although this book
was written specifically for young

Ramla
Update

By LAWRENCE JACKIER

Detroit has completed its
financial commitment to our
partners in Ramla, but the
relationship continues.

Detroit remains committed to
two projects in Ramla: the Senior
Citizens' Center and the after-school
enrichment tutoring program for
elementary school children.
An endowment fund through
United Jewish Charities has been
created for Ramla with $500,000
from previously raised Project
Renewal gifts. The interest from this
fund will be used to cover
maintenance costs for facilities and
for special programming.

Also, Detroit's Sinai Hospital
retains a connection with Ramla's
Assaf Harofeh Hospital. Sinai has
sent used equipment and surgical
supplies to the Israeli hospital, and
the Assaf Harofeh medical director
visited here while on a trip to the
United States. A Sinai internal
medicine resident spent three weeks
in Ramla.

people, it continues to be a valuable
resource for family historians of all
ages.
This book also allows ample
space for the reader to record his or
her own family data along with
photographs. However, it is the
individual essays in each category
such as "where did you come from,
what is your name, when you get
married, visiting a Jewish cemetery,
your most important possessions,
what do you eat, our oldest books,
family documents, stories about my
ancestors' occupations,

organizations we joined, and
relatives who perished in the
Holocaust" which make this book
unique and special.
Also see Toledoteinu: Finding
Your Own Roots (Arbit Books), and
My Family Heritage edited by F..
Michael Carroll (Carriage House
Publications, Ltd.)
All of these books stress the
same basics: interview the oldest
living family members, identify old
photos, collect copies of old family
documents and record what you
find.

PROJECT RENEWAL PUZZLE

Answers to puzzle from Page L-10

CBDNEIGHBORHOODLC
H SHEJPWT S V E N V AYXP
ITVOMDAYCARESTWOA
LNNT EHX V L I SF A EKNR
D ARSENI ORSCOLEPIT
RRTH BFS D V M H R MNI HN
E GFAMILIESODASXTE
N 1BZTXNHJ ZOPRLAWR
A MWAPSZANRLAJZROS
XMPROGRESSERXHRRH
TIORTEDI J LXKOLDGI
OTLG NI S UOHR P WAOXP
P ROJ ECTRENEWALDWZ

Lawrence Jackier is Detroit's
Project Renewal chairman.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

L-11

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan