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June 30, 1989 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-06-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

LETTERS I

THE UNBEATABLE DEALER • THE UNBEATABLE DEALER,

JOE PANIAN ANNOUNCES

9

Continued from Page 6

Annual
Percentage
Rate
Financing
ON SELECT MODELS

REBATES
DOUBLE REBATES
NO DOWN PAYMENT

11

m





New 1990 LUMINA
4DR. SEDAN

11-1

2.5L MFI engine, automatic trans., cloth bench elec. r. defogger,
P195/75R-14 ALS/B Radial 8/W & much more. Stk. #3051

LIST
UNBEATABLE DISCOUNT

$12,483
$1807

NOW $ 10,675

LLI

28 AVAILABLE AT SIMILAR SAVINGS

tR"

CO

z

LL1



rn

1989 S-10 P.U. SHORTBOX

5 speed, 2.5L engine, 1000 lb. payload. Stk.
#1461X
DOUBLE REBATE
$500



26 AVAILABLE AT SIMILAR SAVINGS

BERETTA
COUPE
;. 2.81. MFI V6 eng., Beretta

2.5L MFI eng., elec. r. defog., cloth bench, auto., P185/75R.
14 ALS WS, air cond. & much more. Stk. #1413

CC1

LIST
REBATE
UNBEATABLE DISC

&IWO Mdf0,4*,4018

$12,958
$500
-$1,863

CCP

rT

LIJ





DC

New 1989 SPECTRUM
2 DR. COUPE

1.6 L eng., air cond., 5 spd. trans., elec. AM-FM stereo
w/clock, front/r. floor mats, P155/80R-13 ALS BW & more.
Stk. #508

1JJ

CC1

LIST
DOUBLE REBATE

NOW

$

98598
$800

7248*

25 AVAILABLE AT SIMILAR SAVINGS

Ge

Dealer

1989 1 /2-TON
SUBURBAN

m

Deep tint glass, mats, Slivered°, pwr. windows/-
locks AM - FM stereo, rally wheels, tilt, cruise &
more. Stk. #224
LIST
$20,238

23 AVAILABLE AT SIMILAR SAVINGS

CHEVROLET'S
HIGHEST AWARD FOR
CUSTOMER STATISFACTION

'Plus tax. title & des! All re•
bates included where applicable CI
on select models Dealer parrot,
pation may affect consumer
cost Ad expires July 10
>
• • 1 9",i fixed APR fin for 24
mos in lieu of rebate in coniunC-
with GMAC direct mail Otter
1
APR reduction. Based on MP
approved credit See dealer for
detafls

rn

,,„„

LIJ

r—
m

r--
rn



TELEGRAPH At 12 MILE & 1 696

-

10 FRIDAY, JUNE 30, 1989

• 355-1000

1989, there were 1,120 people
diagnosed with AIDS in this
state, at least 650 of whom
have died. Multiply the
number of confirmed diagnos-
ed by 25-50 and we have an
approximation of those who
are unsuspecting carriers.
While no one locally is
keeping record of how many
Jews have been exposed to
AIDS, I have grieved for one
Jewish friend who has died
and am aware of several other
Jews living with the disease.
What is AIDS? AIDS is a
disease which breaks down
the body's natural immune
system. AIDS itself does not
kill, but leaves the body
vulnerable to other opporut-
nistic diseases that we would
ordinarily have little concern
with. Unlike measles or TB,
AIDS is a difficult disease to
catch. It can only be acquired
through unprotected sexual
contact with an infected part-
ner (gay or straight, male or
female!), by being stuck with
an infected needle or other
piercing tool, or at birth or by
breast feeding from an in-
fected mother.
Alcohol and other "recrea-
tional" drugs also tend to in-
crease susceptibility. AIDS
can not be contacted socially
by shaking a hand or giving
a hug. AIDS is not a punish-
ment from God, any more
than 'Pay Sachs, sickle cell, or
tuberculosis.
Is AIDS a Jewish issue? Yes,
and more. It is a human issue.
All of us wil be affected, if not
ourselves then by awareness
of someone we know — a
child, parent, or other
relative, a friend, neighbor or
co-worker. We are all affected
by (until recently) conser-
vative governmental blocks
at education and significant
research funding, because five
or ten years ago, AIDS was
relegated as a "gay disease."
The best preventative of
AIDS and the fear of AIDS is
education. People with con-
cerns or questions can contact
their local health department
or Wellness Networks, Inc.,
Michigan's central resource
for information, referral and
support services in response
to AIDS.

Mr. Rosenblatt asks if we
can separate our feelings
about homosexuality and
AIDS. We had better. As long
as we narrowly perceive AIDS
in this context, the statistics
will continue to rise.

Peter Cooper
Detroit

Helping Soviet
Immigration

There is now serious
disagreement over the alloca-
tion of funds to help resettle
Soviet Jews. The argument is
being made that Soviet Jews
come to America with Jewish
community assistance only to
get out of the Soviet Union.
Once they are established
they become completely
assimilated and have little
further contact with the
Jewish community.
Rabbi Moshe Rosen is
quoted as saying, "As for
those who want to come to
America, we should say: Good
luck, but this is not the
Jewish people's problem."
In the early part of this cen-
tury, American Jews faced
with massive Russian Jewish
immigration complained that
the Russian Jews were too Or-
thodox and would be unable
to assimilate into American
culture. Now we are being
told that the Russian Jews
are too assimilated and will
not remian distinctively a
part of the Jewish
community.
Both arguments have the
same motive — to cut off aid
to Jews who wish to leave a
land of oppression for asylum
in a land of opportunity.
Funds should certainly be
divided between helping to
restore the spiritual life of
Jews within the Soviet Union
and helping Jews to settle in
Israel. But, to argue against
helping Soviet Jews settle in
America is a travesty. Have
we forgotten the lessons of the
Holocaust so quickly? Jewish
survival at the turn of the
century hinged on the mass
migration of Jews out of
Eastern Europe .. .

Barry Mehier
Big Rapids

I OPINION

The Census

Continued from Page 7

that it intended to use new
statistical techniques to cor-
rect it.
In fact, the bureau began
the preparations necessary to
accomplish this result, but
the Commerce Department,
which oversees the bureau,
prohibited the bureau from

continuing any further
preparations. The Commerce
Department claimed that cor-
recting for undercount was
not technically feasible,
although other respected cen-
sus experts today do not agree
with this assessment.
Legislation to require cor-

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