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June 23, 1989 - Image 72

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-06-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

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70

FRIDAY, JUNE 23, 1989

P.No






Outdoor Concert Venue
Finds Favor With Violinist

ROBYN KLEEREKOPER

Special to the Jewish News

1.1

e's a warm, self-effac-
ing man, a family
man. And yet, this
cheerful and soft-spoken in-
dividual will turn into a very
serious musician when he
steps out onto the stage at
Meadow Brook on Thursday
to perform as solo violinist
with the Detroit Symphony
Orchestra.
Joseph Goldman speaks en-
thusiastically about the
Meadow Brook Music Festi-
val, the summer home of the
DSO. For intimacy of perfor-
mance, its natural assets and
its accoustics, he maintains
you'd have to search hard to
find another outdoor summer
site that comes anywhere
close to it.
"Meadow Brook is probably
the most beautiful outdoor
music festival in the country.
It is spectacular. One of the
advantages is the pavilion
here is not as large as in a lot
of other cities where the goal
is to sell as many tickets as
possible. lb do that those
places have to use amplifica-
tion and they don't have the
same intimate setting as
Meadow Brook. The grounds
are very nice with the woods
around."

At Thursday's concert,
Goldman will temporarily
abandon his normal role as
assistant concertmaster with
the DSO to perform Theme by
19th Century French com-
poser Ernest Amedee
Chausson, and Introduction
and Rondo Capricioso by
Camille Saint-Saens, who
also was French.
Goldman was born in Ur-
bana, Ill., but grew up in Kan-
sas City, Mo. He began play-
ing the violin at age 8, giving
his first public performance
as a soloist a year later. By
the time he was 14 he had
performed as a soloist with
both the Kansas City Youth
Symphony and the Kansas
City Philharmonic.
Goldman's love of music
was influenced by the fact
that both his parents were
amateur musicians. His
mother plays the violin and
his father, the piano. His two
brothers and his sister also
are musicians.
He chose music as a career
after his father, a professor,
took the family with him on
sabbatical to London,
England, where young Gold-
man studied with David Mar-

Violinist Joseph Goldman will appear at Meadow Brook on Thursday.

tin of the Royal Academy of
Music.
"I'd say it was the entire
musical scene in London, the
number of concerts I was able
to attend, that had the big-
gest influence on my going in-
to music," Goldman explains.
Several of his teachers had
an impact on Goldman. Most
of them were students of the
Galamian School. Ivan Gala-
mian taught at Juilliard and
Curtis Institute for 30 or 40
years, and instructed many of
today's leading musicians. He
also ran a music camp in
upstate New York called
Meadowmount, where Gold-
man spent four summers.
Goldman studied with Tiber-
ius Klausner at the Universi-
ty of Missouri Conservatory
of Music and studied with
Paul Makanowitzky and
Gustave Rosseels at the
University of Michigan.
When he was 20, he was ap-
pointed assistant concert-
master of the DSO, the
youngest musician to ever
hold that position. He has
been with the DSO ever since.
Now 36, Goldman has given
many solo performances and
appeared at Carnegie Hall,
the Kennedy Center for Per-
forming Arts and at Meadow
Brook. He has been guest
soloist with various or-
chestras under some of the
most repsected conductors in
the country, and is also the
winner of several
competitions.
Goldman's happy with his
position as a violinist. He's
not interested in branching
out into a career as a conduc-
tor or a composer.

"The only time I've con-
ducted occurred a few months
ago at a pops concert in Ford
Auditorium. The conductor
wanted to make an ap-
pearance on stage after the
music began so I was engag-
ed to start things off," laughs
Goldman. "And I don't think
I'm creative enough to com-
pose. When you look at all the
great composers there are,
and have been, it seems silly
unless you have a tremendous
talent for it."
Goldman is married to
another DSO violinist. She
plays first violin. The couple
met at the University of
Michigan. "In fact we sat on
the same stand in the or-
chestra." They have been
married almost 15 years, and
have two young daughters
age 8 and 11.
"Both my daughers play
the violin, but not by choice,"
teases Goldman, "and they
are very talented. My wife
teaches them. Actually my
older daughter wants to be an
Olympic skater. I think she's
very good, but how many
Olympic skaters are there?"
When not putting in a
40-hour week of practicing
and performing, Goldman
sells real estate.
"It's the type of thing you
can do on your own hours. My
symphony commitments give
me a different kind of
scheduling than most 9 to 5
jobs would. I work most even-
ings and weekends normally.
Real estate I can manage in
the time I want."
Goldman also likes to put-
ter around the house. In addi-
tion, he collects cut glass and

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