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June 09, 1989 - Image 32

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-06-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

MEDIA MONITOR

I

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Special to The Jewish News

Fashion Forward "Mix & Match"

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priced from $10.00-95.00.

Salads and Mugs 50-80% off.

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Post Gives 2 Sides
Of Palestinian Voting

n an editorial and an op-
ed piece, the Washington
Post has presented both
sides of the debate on the
Israeli government's offer for
elections to be held among
Palestinians in the West
Bank and Gaza.
The editorial lauded the
Israeli peace plan as "conse-
quential" and "the only mov-
ing vehicle of Middle East
diplomacy." It said Israeli
doves are "leery" of the plan
because it may help Israel
"escape American pressure
and evade the territorial
issue," and Israeli hawks
distrust it "because they fear
it will put Israel on the slip-
pery slope leading to a
Palestinian West Bank state."
"The American obligation,"
stated Post editors, "is to
make the plan work for
American purposes: to make
it a reliable instrument of the
Palestinian will, to use it to
produce a negotiation that
will terminate the Palesti-
nian uprising and the Israeli
occupation alike, and to bring
Palestinians a West Bank
homeland in conditions pro-
tective of Israeli security."
But an article on the Post's
op-ed page concluded that the
elections offered by Israel
"will be nothing but a device
for perpetuating Israeli oc-
cupation" of the West Bank
and Gaza.
Bassam AbuSharif, iden-
tified by the Post as "a senior
PLO official and a spokesman
for Yassir Arafat," wrote that
free elections can only be held
in a climate "without restric-
tions, threats or any form of
intimidation. This is impossi-
ble in the West Bank and
Gaza, where any gathering,
even of only five people, can
be broken up with bullets.
Nor is it possible when
Palestinians who try to prac-
tice their right to freedom of
expression are liable to pro-
secution."
Free elections also require,
wrote AbuSharif, "a set of
rules that safeguards those
elections." In 1976, he said,
the PLO agreed to elections
for West Bank municipal
councils. Of the 116 can-
didates victorious in 1976
West Bank municipal council
elections, 96, he said, backed
the PLO. Israeli authorities,
he charged, subsequently
tried to assassinate three of
the elected mayors and
deported two others to
Jordan.

Recent statements by
Israel's prime minister and
defense minister, said
AbuSharif, confirm Palesti-
nians' suspicions that if "they
make the wrong choice, it will
not be respected" by Israelis.

Chasidim
Cool Off
In N.H.

For Christians, there is the
Bethlehem of the West Bank.
For certain Chasidic Jews,
mostly from Brooklyn, there
is Bethlehem, New Hamp-
shire, a small town in the
White Mountains that boasts
the Arlington Hotel, a rest
spot that caters to Chasidim.
The hotel is featured in
New England Monthly, where
it is described as a place that
"most leisure-seeking
Americans would find . . .
barren, a cultural moon-
scape." The Arlington lacks
tennis, shopping, air-
conditioning. Its rooms are
"cramped and furnished with
iron bed-steads and rummag-
ed dressers." And its pool is
"surrounded by a 15-foot
chain-link fence draped with
plastic tarps, and the men
and women swim separately."
But because Chasidim, ac-
cording to author Barry
Werth, "are determinedly the
opposite of most leisure-
seeking Americans, nothing
`is' missing here. The
Chasidim may be the last peo-
ple in America who go to the
mountains to sit on a porch,
read a newspaper in their
native language, clothe
themselves in the comfort of
their community, take family
meals, then walk no place
special just so they can breath
the air and feel the rustling
wind."
Now, with "condo hamlets"
springing up everywhere
around Bethlehem, writes
Werth, "it is only a matter of
time .. . before small,
marginal hotels like the Arl-
ington will be swept away.
After all, if there's anything
the leisure industry abhors
its an anachronism . . . "

Israelis Bicker
Over Rushdie
Book's Publishing

Israel, land of contrasts,
held to its reputation in its
reaction to the Salman
Rushdie affair. According to
an article in Fame magazine
by Carlin Romano, Israelis
disagree vehemently on
whether Rushdie's book, The

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