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May 26, 1989 - Image 114

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-05-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

KIDS

A new choice for the frail elderly

.c■

Independent Living with
Supportive Services

A new caring alternative for
the frail elderly is now
available at the exciting new
and elegant West Bloomfield
Nursing and Convalescent
Center.

En Masse

Continued from preceding page

• Deluxe semi-private or private
mini suites all with private
baths and a beautiful view of
a courtyard or wooded
grounds.

• Town Center Plaza with a
It's called Independent Living
snack shop, beauty salon,
with Supportive Services. It's
flower and gift shop and an
the choice between
old-fashioned ice cream parlor.
independent living and skilled
nursing care for the elderly
• Fine dining in an elegant
person who needs the
dining area with meals
essentials of living such as
prepared by an executive chef
housekeeping service, meals,
and served by a courteous,
laundry service and
friendly staff
medication, if needed.
Licensed nurses are on duty 24
hours a day.
• Exciting and varied activities,
planned and supervised, to
Residents in this program can
keep residents involved and
enjoy a relaxed, elegant
happy
atmosphere that includes:

• Pastoral and weekly Sabbath
services provided by Rabbi
Moshe Poker

Honor us with o visit. Weekdays 9 o.m-8 p.m.
Saturday & Sunday, noon-5 p.m.

An Affiliate of William Beaumont Hospital

We St 01 9011yr
kh LirWV/I19

6445 West Maple • West Bloomfield, MI

Phone: 661-1600

and 63 0-nealet Centep-

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VISA'

NOT EVERY DOG
HAS HIS DAYS

Take a tool* your own pet. Can you picture him cold
and starvi ? Or abused. Or worse.
It•s an
ul picture. Yet it's e that thousands of
animals ar&iorced to live e
day.
We at
Michigan Humane ociety are putting a slop
to that. Butfwe need your help.,
We offer Imre than just shelter to lost and abused
animals. WE provide them with!the medical attention
and love they so desperately need. And we have a legal
branch thaVinvestigates and prctsecutes cruelty ca
But it takes money to continue this work. Please 1p.
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to the Michigan • 1
umane Society.

Give

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erte
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FRIDAY, MAY 26, 1989

, •rtitomMitirlplilmerMMMIIIIIMUMMOMMIM.

Together,
there's so much
good we can do.

Esther Freeman directs bar mitzvah practice.

Jennifer's report covers the
way coming-of-age is handled
among Jews worldwide. "I was
interested because how we
celebrate is so different from
how some of our friends do,"
she says. Jennifer, like some of
her classmates, has attended
at least one traditional
religious bar mitzvah, an
event she characterizes as
"kind of long." Like Ben, Jen-
nifer is working on Yiddish
greetings to augment her
presentation.
The students' research, ac-
cording to Freeman, usually
runs to books and interviews.
Jineene, writing on the
Chinese Jews of Kaifeng, has
traveled to Cleveland to view
a Diaspora exhibit, and to
East Lansing to hear a speech.
In the Kaifeng area of China,
says Jineene, the residents
"aren't really Jews" in the
way we know them, "but more
like descendents now." Ji-
neene's Yiddish offering will
be "In the Diaspora," a poem.
Though no rabbi officiates
at a Workmen's Circle bar
mitzvah, a parent or teacher
usually takes the podium to
introduce the celebrant, part
of the "togetherness" aspect of
the organization, Freeman
says. "We're very democratic
in that sense. We want to work
with our children to make
them feel part of our culture.
They're members of our socie-
ty not an autonomous group."
Workmen's Circle children
begin in Sunday school at age
5, where they're treated to
songs, folktales and Bible
stories by one of the group's
three teachers. From there the
pupils study Jewish life, cur-
rent events, history and, for
the older kids, Yiddish.
The unorthodox nature of a
Workmen's Circle bar mitzvah
reflects the group's approach
to Judaism as a whole. "We're
not anti-religious," says
Freeman. "Our members
know that they can find
religious training outside our
school, and some do belong to

synagogues. We mark our
holidays in a secular fashion."
For the latest bar mitzvah
kids, their preparation is
another step in a busy life
that envelops public school
and their hobbies (model
trains for Ben, violin and-
piano for Jineene, and "all
sports and talking on the
phone" for Jennifer).
A graduating Workmen's
Circle student has the option
to continue independent study
in Yiddish and other subjects.
Do the three plan to go on
with their studies? They look
wary.
"Maybe," says Ben. "I'm
thinking about it," says Jen-
nifer. "Maybe," says Jineene.
Freeman and other staff
members have high hopes for
Ben, Jennifer, Jineene and
their classmates. The prin-
cipal describes a renewed in-
terest in both Jewish secular
education and in her group's
philosophy of "freedom,
brotherhood, peace, and social
consciousness." As Freeman
sees it, in past years "we've
lost a generation," but now "in
Detroit, we're starting to gain
more young people." 111

'I LOCAL NEWS

I

Red Cross
Offers Class

The Southeastern Michigan
Chapter of the American Red
Cross will sponsor a one-day
training session, "Providing
Red Cross Disaster Health
Services," on June 10 at
9 a.m. at Red Cross chapter
headquarters, 100 Mack Ave.,
Detroit.
This training session is
designed for nurses interested
in volunteering their time
and skills in the delivery of
disaster health services. The
training is free, but space is
limited.
For information or to
register, call Barbara
Spillman, 967-0966.

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