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May 06, 1989 - Image 65

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-05-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

walk the younger one around it at a
safe distance. Be reasonable. Don't
walk 20 feet from the swing or your
child may think you're taking him for
a hike! Four to six feet from the fur-
thest reach of the swing occupant is
sufficient.
Show your child how the swing
moves, explaining that it moves for-
ward and back at the same speed.
Let him touch the foot of the swing
occupant to feel the force. Have your
child recite with you, "I don't walk too
close to swings."
One quick word about swing
choices. Most play safety experts
agree that rubber sling-style swings
offer far less of a hazard than swings
made of other rigid materials like
wood or plastic. The rubber sling
swing conforms to the rider's shape,
thus eliminating periphery protusions
that can cause injury. Most acciden-
tal contact is with the occupant's
body, usually the feet, knees or back
of the rider.

H ART

O

ORIGINALS
ONLY

Slides

Often, young children find sliding
to be their first truly "independent"
play activity. Teaching these anxious
little sliders to be cautious can be a
difficult assignment.
Before a child can slide, he gen-
erally must climb a ladder. Most chil-
dren who can climb a ladder inde-
pendently possess the dexterity to
maneuver themselves into a sitting
position, begin to slide and, with
practice, complete the slide on their
feet.
Tell your child to climb the ladder
one rung at a time. Show him how
to climb moving your feet first, then
moving your hands. Help him by
moving his feet and hands in the
proper sequence until he masters the
procedure.
Once the child arrives at the top of
the slide, he must then maneuver
himself into a sitting position. Tell your
child that he must be sitting in the
center of the slide before he begins.
Tell your child to slow himself prior to
starting to slide. Show your child how
to use the sides of his shoes as
"brakes" by spreading his legs and
feet to meet the sides of the slide.







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