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May 06, 1989 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-05-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ENS
BATH TOWELS

8

Grandma's House

O

UTICA TOP OF THE LINE
"EMBRACABLE" BATH TOWELS

BATH
REG. $20.00

WASHCLOTH
REG. $5 00

13 99
399

799

HAND
REG. $10.00

399

FINGERTIPS
REG. $5 00

1999
16"

BATH SHEETS
REG. $35.00
TUB MATS
REG. $25.00

Farmington Hills
Orchard Place
30875 Orchard Lk. Rd.
14 Mile & Orchard Lake Rd.

1 0

41
MatleLCord

855-0122

NOW OPEN:

011110

Madison Heights
32115 John R
Madison Place
Btw. 13 and 14 Mile

Prices good thru April 22

14 Mlle

S.



ci

S.

O

13 Mlle

589-3033

Hours: Monday thru Saturday: 10:00-9:00, Sunday 12:00-5:00

FURNITURE

NOVI
43236 Novi Town Center
Grand River & Novi Rd.
South of 1-96
347-4610

Patio Furniture

14

HOME

year. The fourth wall of the sukkah
was the house itself so that Grandma
could open the window of her kitchen
and pass the plates right through
into the sukkah.
A polished wood staircase led
upstairs. I can still remember my
brave cousin Marilyn sliding down
the smooth banister, the only one of
us who ever had the guts to do it. She
never got caught or spanked al-
though we all lied to protect her when
she hit her head on the metal orna-
ment at the bottom.
There were three high-ceilinged
rooms with polished mahogany
doors on the second floor. The first
was a room with twin beds where my
brother and I often slept. On Friday
nights, someone would bring a can-
dle for us and put it on the dresser
because it was already Shabbos and
we could not use the lights. Left alone
to sleep, we would hold hands across

WATERFORD
7350 Highland Rd. (M-59)
7 miles West of Telegraph
near Pontiac Airport
666-2880

Hours: Mon., Thur., Fri. 10-8
Tues., Wed., Sat. 10-6
Sun. 11-4

Here was the location of
the largest seders I have
ever seen. 30 to 40 people.
Tables added to each other,
as many as needed.

the gap between the beds as we
watched the dwindling candle cast
strange shadows on the walls. There
was no bathroom on the second floor
and we would not venture from our
beds in the darkness, so we would
lie there waiting for morning rather
than go downstairs in the darkness
to the bathroom.
The second bedroom was Grand-
ma and Grandpa's room with twin
beds and Grandpa's porcelain
chamber pot.
The last room was the parlor, my
favorite room in the house. It was
about two-thirds the size of the entire
floor. Rust damask drapes hung from
the highest ceiling I had ever seen
Between the front windows was a mir-
ror that ran from floor to ceiling with
a small ledge at the bottom where a
child could sit. There were a sofa,
several beds, easy chairs, another
fireplace like the one in the dining
room, a player piano, giant paintings
in gold carved frames, wooden ward-
robe closets to hide in, and best of

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