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May 05, 1989 - Image 78

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-05-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ENTERTAINMENT I

LIVERIO'S

Dint Of Fate

Continued from preceding page

Restaurant

Serving Fine Italian Continental Cuisine

J"l other's

a

SUNDAY, MAY 14

Specializing In
Veal • Seafood • Gourmet Pasta
Lamb Chops • Chicken • Etc.
Complete Bar Service

2 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Watch For The Opening of Our Outside Patio

3832 N. Woodward Between 13 and 14 Mile on the E •st Side
Across from Pasqua/es

549-3344

You're At
The Head
Of The Class

A Suite Weekend

79

REG.
LESS$1

()SPECIAL
DISCOUNT

Celebrate the opening of Jacques Demers Restaurant &
Lounge with our special May Weekend Rate.
A luxurious two-room suite complete with living room,
private bedroom and wet bar with refrigerator.
Two hour manager's reception each evening.'
Free breakfast cooked-to-order every morning in our
beautiful atrium.

With a Subscription
To The Jewish News

Call: 354-6060

THE JEWISH NEWS

EMBASSY

SUITES'
HOTEL

1-800-EMBASSY
You don't have to be a fat cat to enjoy The Suite Life.sin

DETROIT



SOUTHFIELD

28100 Franklin Rd.
(313) 350-2000

*Available Friday or Saturday. Price is per suite, per night, per couple.
Suites at this price subject to availability. -I-Subject to state and local laws.

Owned & Operated by The Management Group, Inc.

WAFFLE -1

04 2, ,, ,\es
°cc‘s-

OMELETTE
OMELETTE
BUY ONE PLAIN WAFFLE OR ONE

2 GREAT LOCATIONS

PLAIN OMELETTE ONLY WITH
TOAST & JELLY . GET ONE .

‘6. ,0e-\exke

L

78

26505 NORTHWESTERN HWY.
SOUTHFIELD
6680 ORCHARD LAKE RD.
WEST BLOOMFIELD

FRIDAY, MAY 5, 1989

FREE

VALID MONDAY THRU FRIDAY

Eat less
saturated
fats.

WERE FIGHTING FOR
YOUR LIFE

j

American Heart
Association

Greenwich Village, Up the
Pentagon and Young Doctors
in Love.
He has drafted three novels
and even wrote lyrics for an
entertaining yet ill-fated
Broadway musical entitled
Cafe Crown. Its major claim
to fame was that it provided
Alan Alda with his first ma-
jor role.
Still an accomplished musi-
cian, playing the piano,
classical guitar and har-
monica, Brill also holds a
black belt in Aikido, is fluent
in six languages (Yiddish,
Japanese, Italian, German,
Romanian and English) and
is a marathon runner.
After such a varied career,
Brill is returning to the stage
once again to do stand-up
comedy. His material is a
varied as he is, but he does
like to concentrate on the
political area, especially the
many politicians who have
been pushed on the public
because of TV. He also enjoys
some rather distinct ethnic
humor, pointing to the "Irish
who gave us Eddie Murphy
and Jews who gave us Whoopi
Goldberg."
Another funny bit revolves
around his father, an im-
migrant, Brill says, "who
learned only one word of
English and was made the
language supervisor of the
post office department!'
Brill admits that while
there "were an unbelievable
amount of small clubs up and
down the whole Eastern sea-
board" when he started his
stand-up career in the 1960s,
giving him ample opportuni-
ty to showcase his many
talents, he has indeed paid
his dues.
He says, "You have no idea
how hard I worked and the
kind of dues I paid. There was
a bleak period in comedy in
the '60s when there was no
interest in comedians on a na-
tional level. At my peak I did
60 shows for Merv, 37 for
Johnny Carson and dozens of
Mike Douglas appearances.
And yet all that made no im-
pact on the industry. Whereas
today, if a comic does five or
six Carson shows, he's a na-
tional name."
Today, he adds, "doing five
shots on Carson's show is
practically a career. There's
nothing after that. Nowhere
to go. The attention span of
an audience seems much
shorter. Look at careers like
a Jack Benny or a Red
Skelton. Their careers lasted
a whole lifetime. But in
comedy today, five shots and
you're out. People seem to tire
very quickly of everything."
Brill also accused comedy
club owners today of believing
that no comic over the age of

25 can make people laugh.
"There's this kind of continu-
ing notion among the guys
who run these clubs that
older comedians can't play to
a younger audience. And
that's just not true. Put
Milton Berle in a comedy club
and he'll find the connection,
a way to make those kids
laugh. Whether you're 20, 60
or 80, if you're funny, you're
funny.
"When I was a kid," he con-
tinued, "we loved Martin and
Lewis, who were the young
kids on the block. But at the
same time we loved Eddie
Cantor. -We loved the new
guys and the old ones alike. I
believe there's a door being
shut and it isn't fair because
everybody's missing out.
There's no tradition, no con-
nection with the past. We're
going to end up producing
these freaky, alien kids who
don't know what their past
was and that will be a real
shame."
It's a tough and often
unrelenting business, filled
with the whims and wishes of
those who are not always in
the know. What keeps Marty
Brill in it?
"Fear;' he answers quickly.
"Fear of poverty:' he laughs.
"I can't get into another pro-
fession now. It's too late. Oh,
one day you might say to
yourself, that's it. I'm not go-
ing to do this anymore. But
the next thing you know, you
get an idea and a kernel
starts to form. Next thing you
know you're writing it down.
You just can't help it. For bet-
ter or worse, this is the
business I'm in and it's the
only thing I know how to do.
So I guess I'm stuck!" ❑

DSO Concert
Trip Slated

The city of Southfield Iburs
will go hear a Detroit Sym-
phony Orchestra coffee con-
cert on May 12. Free coffee
and donuts will be served.
The trip includes round-trip
motorcoach transportation
and lunch at the Rhinoceros
restaurant. There is limited
space. Call Sol Gelbman,
354-4717, for information and
reservations.

Author Appears
At Borders

Pulitzer Prize-winning jour-
nalist Neil Sheehan will be at
Border's Book Shop May 15
from 5 to 7 p.m. to autograph
his book, A Bright Shining

Lie. Border's Book Shop is
located in the Corners Shop-
ping Plaza.

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