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May 05, 1989 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-05-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

NEWS

RECONSTRUCTIVE
SURGERY

Study

Continued from Page 1

If you're proud of the car you drive, you know how devastating body damage can be —
whether it's large or small. Maxie Collision Repair specializes in the repair of luxury and
sports automobiles. Although we'll repair any make and model, we offer the expertise only
the most discriminating consumer will demand. Paint and body repair — performed by ex-
perts in the field, with the latest in high technology equipment.

We'll have your body back in shape in no time. And, at no extra cost. We're no more ex-
pensive than the ordinary body shop. But we have a lot more to offer.
Since you are what you drive — it should look at least as good as you do. See us for a
free estimate. And compare. Once you've been to Maxie, you'll never go anywhere else.

Maxie Collision, Inc.

32581 Northwestern Highway
Farmington Hills, Michigan 48018
737-7122

For Mother's Day

See our expanded line of custom
jewelry, name brand watches, fine
crystal and accessories.

All merchandise is offered at
outstanding discount prices.
Gift wrapping is free. All sales can be exchanged or refunded. Receive a free gift when you visit.

WICINTUAUU JEWELERS

"Sunset Strip" 29536 Northwestern Highway, Southfield, Michigan 48034
Hours: Monday - Friday 10 - 5:30, Saturday 10 - 5
Phone: 357-4000

"tt.A",

Lop

tUltION!
1‘

MM.

VISA

One Week Only: May 3-10

• 10% off all closet systems.*
• 10 shoe drawers free with custom installation.

• 10-year-old prices on select merchandise.

SPECIAL GIFT FOR FIRST HUNDRED $50 CUSTOMERS

LUTTER ® The Complete Closet Store

ONTROL

16

28956 Orchard Lake Road, Frm. His.
OPEN 7 DAYS / 855-9678

INC

*excluding previous sales

FRIDAY, MAY 5, 1989

-

■ P‘, ba ■ www,

Stuart Hertzberg

James August

dollars it expends for services
($40 million annually accor-
ding to Hertzberg) and in
terms of its organizations and
facilities.
"We plan, organize and
deliver these services for a
group of people for which
there is little factual informa-
tion. How many are there?
Who are we inadequately ser-
ving? What high-priority
needs are we not serving?
What low-priority needs are
we over-serving?"
• August said the 18 other
largest Jewish communities
in North America have
already done this kind of
research, but Detroit has
delayed because of the cost.
"There have always been
other priorities, but we have

come to realize under the
leadership of (Federation
President) Connie Giles and
(Executive Vice President)
Marty Kraar that we have
grown to such enormous size
and this will allow us to be
more efficient with our
services.
"It will also allow us to fun-
draise more effectively. The
net result is we will better
meet the needs of the com-
munity," August said.
He sees the study improv-
ing communal communica-
tion and providing data on
the future direction of Jewish
education in Detroit and on
future building needs, such as
the Home for Aged and the
Jimmy Prentis Morris Com-
munity Center. 111

Austrian Town Quiet
On Hitler's Birthday

Braunau, Austria (JTA) —
Although the mayor of the
town where Adolf Hitler was
born received death threats
last week and was called a
Jewish pig, the town escaped
violence on the 100th birth-
day of the Nazi leader.
Skiba was worried that neo-
Nazis from around the world
would gather here to com-
memorate the 100th birthday
of the Nazi leader.
April 20 passed better than
had been expected.
The local newspaper Rund-
schau had summed up the
situation preceding the an-
niversary with the headline
"Braunauers live in fear."
Shop owners who could not
put their faith in the 250
assembled police officers had
sealed their windows with
wooden boards, in anticipa-
tion of violence.
Tight controls at the near-
by border with West Germany
had prevented some from
even entering Austria. Only
small groups of young men
with short haircuts hinting at

their political ideology stroll-
ed across the town square.
Few aging followers of
Hitler who could really
remember him even had the
chance to catch a glimpse of
the house in which their idol
was born, barricaded as it was
by a police cordon.
Still, a few neo-Nazis raised
their hands in the Nazi
salute. They were imme-
diately arrested for that
display.
Most of them were soon
released and forced to leave
the country. Among the 30 ar-
rested, only two were
Austrians.
In the end, courage and
decency won the day. The
newly installed Socialists
dared to erect a memorial,
right in front of Hitler's bir-
thplace, on public ground..
It is a huge granite block
from the quarry of the former
Mauthausen concentration
camp, inscribed with the
words: "For peace, freedom
and democracy. Never again
fascism."

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