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April 28, 1989 - Image 99

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-04-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

helped form a branch of
Amnesty International at
Brother Rice. He sees the
events of the Holocaust as
evidence of how humans are
vicious at heart and realizes
that "we as people have got to
be better than that.

,,-.# ,-.4t: .

"It is human nature to
blame others and look for a
scapegoat as Hitler did,
rather than place blame on
ourselves," he said. ❑

Sunday, May 7th

Bloomfield High; Elizabeth
Schwartz and Merrill Zack of
Cranbrook/Kingswood Upper
School, and Melissa Bullard
and Laurie Vereecke of
Milford High.
The judges of this year's
competition were: Charles
Silow, president of
C.H.A.I.M.; Dr. Sidney
Bolkosky, professor of history,
University of Michigan-
Dearborn; Barbara Gray,
assistant director, Greater
Detroit Interfaith Round
Table of Christians and Jews;
and Evelyn Ribitwer Sahn,
board of directors of
C.H.A.I.M.
Following is the winning
essay:

11:30 a.m. - Walk for Israel
Noon - Israeli Film
1:30 p.m. - The Great Israeli Kumsitz - family picnic
2:30 p.m. - Israeli Kumsitz - Dudaim Performing
3:30 p.m - Israel Knowledge Quiz Bowl
3:30 p.m. - Film "Kasablan"
Children's Activities - Petting Farm

Something for Everybody

Monday, May 8th

7:30 p.m. - Yom Hazikaron - Memorial to Fallen Israeli Soldiers

.

Hands Of Death vs.•Hands Of Life

We all desire to live in a bet-
ter world — a world where we
can live safely and happily,
long into a promising future.
But no such world can exist
without the efforts of every-
one pointed toward making
positive changes. And no such
effort can exist without the
guidance of knowledge about
the past. History will only
repeat itself if we ignore it.
Unless we change the future,
it will be marred by events ex-
actly like the atrocities of the
past.
The Holocaust is a tragic
example of such an atrocity.
Six million Jews and five
million non-Jews were
murdered. It is an action that
exceeds the limits of sense.
The scariest aspect of the
Holocaust lies in the fact that
people allowed it to happen.
Such devastation must never
be allowed to happen again,
for the sake of all humanity.
We must learn about the
Holocaust, and remember its
tragedy; it is up to us, not fate,
to prevent such slaughter
from taking place ever again.
Experience brings us
knowledge. The horrendous
experience of the Holocaust
awakens us to what can hap-
pen when the negative in-
fluence of one person leads

LI:.r.2 i s - a Ez .7.a Eqsn7-

0

CHAIM Essay Contest
Winner Announced

Maureen Reed, a junior at
West Bloomfield High School,
is this year's first place win-
ner in the Holocaust Educa-
tion Writing Competition.
High schools in Oakland
and Washtenaw counties,
were invited to participate in
the competition. The topic of
the essay was "Why should
students learn about the
Holocaust? How can this lear-
ning experience be applied to
life today?"
Other winners were: second
place, Joshua Keidan, senior
at West Bloomfield High;
third place, Victoria Fielder,
freshman at Milford High.
Honorable mentions went
to: Jennifer Finer of West

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-- - .

many people to act without
morals or compassion. Eleven
million people died. Isn't that
figure alone enough to make
us realize that we must learn
about the Holocaust?
Throughout history, there are
recurring examples of man's
inhumanity to man. The
Holocaust defines this in-
humanity, and through lear-
ning this definition, man will
realize the desperate need for
morality and humanity in our
future.
Through learning about the
Holocaust, our present lives
will profit as much as our
future. Our knowledge can
provide us with an under-
standing of what happened,
and a realization of its
devastating effect. The in-
conceivable actions of the
Holocaust killed ordinary,
good people, just like you and
me. If such a slaughter hap-
pened once, there is a
possibility that it could hap-
pen again. What is to prevent
it? We are.
Through a familiarity with
the past, people today will be
inspired to better the future.
Our future lies in our hands.
We must remember the
Holocaust so that our hands
will not destroy life, as did the
hands of the past.

Tuesday, May 9th

7:30 p.m. Yoel Sharabi - Yom Ha'Atzmaut Concert

Saturday, May 20th

9:30 p.m. - Gevatron-Israeli Folk Singers

Happy 41st Birthday
Israel

For Further Information Call 661-1000, ext. 293

The Jewish Community Center of Metropolitan Detroit

6600 West Maple Road, West Bloomfield, MI 48322

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THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

91

ENERATI • N

the satisfaction of dying."
Tranchida never read about
the Holocaust and had
limited exposure to Jews.
"The main thing that wor-
ries me about the Holocaust,"
he said, "is that everyone in
Germany accepted it. We can
see what is happening in
South Africa today, and we
should be able to learn from
the past, but history is still
being ignored."
Last year, Tranchida,

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