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April 28, 1989 - Image 76

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-04-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ENTERTAINMENT

Music Man

Continued from preceding page

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FRIDAY, APRIL 28, 1989



Kosins has been involved in
record producing. He founded
his own label, Open Sky
Records, and has recorded
such artists as Al Hibbler, the
Ink Spots, guitarist Laurindo
Almeida and flutist Bud
Shank. Actor John Carradine
did a narration on Kosins first
album.
He picked artists for his
label who long ago stopped
recording because he felt there
still was public interest. "I
decided there was a market
for records by old stars who
were remembered and who
still drew crowds at our club
engagements, but had not
recorded in a long time," he
said.
When Kosins went into pro-
ducing he found it necessary
to start his own label. "I
wanted to produce and the
best way to do it and have it
come out right is do it
yourself' He began producing
in 1981 and pursued it for five
years. Although he's not ac-
tively involved in record pro-
ducing today, he'll return if he
gets a new idea for a project,
he said.
Recording engineer Danny
Dallas finds that Kosins is a
capable producer. "He's pretty
good at what he does," Dallas
said. "He knows the music
end of it. I really respected
what he did." Dallas had
worked with Kosins on
albums featuring readings by
actors Carradine and Loretta
Swit and commercials for
Somerset Mall.
Kosins favors the music of
Beethoven and Bach, but he
likes most of the works of
major classical composers. He
also admires the work of Fats
Waller, Gene Austin and opera
singer James Melton. He
likens his style to that of
pianist George Feyer, but ad-
mires keyboardists Eddie
Duchin and Carmen
Caballero as well.
He's worked with some top
names in the classical, jazz
and popular music fields: Con-
ductor Sir Neville Marriner,
flutist Shank, jazz pianist
Hank Jones, singer Hibbler
and guitarist Almeida. Shank
and Almeida have recorded
Kosins' compositions.
In addition to his Monday-
Saturday performances — solo
on weeknights and with his
trio on weekends — Kosins is
working on a series of books
aimed at children and young
adults.
"It's something that I've
always liked," he said. "It's
something I intend to pursue
because it's complementary to
the music, without taking me
away from the music."
lb pianist Tom Barna, who
has worked with Kosins on
several projects, no matter

Kosins appears on weekends with trio members Al Martin, left, on bass and
Ken Everts on drums.

what the producer-arranger-
musician puts his mind to,
he'll do it with style.
"He has a real integrity and
dedication about what he
does," Barna said. "Whatever
endeavor he's working with he
puts all energies and the

greatest degree of honesty (in
it) that he can do."
Soft-spoken and low-key,
Kosins isn't looking for medals
and praise. He's happy with
the. status quo. "I'm just
coasting and content to be
playing piano." ❑

Stratford Opens Season
With 'Merchant of Venice'

ROSE KLEINER

Special to The Jewish News

A

lthough the staging of

The Merchant of
Venice (May 8 to Oct.
28) this year has already stir-
red controversy, the Stratford
Festival promises both great
theater and stimulating ac-
tivities in the coming season.
Besides The Merchant of
Venice the Festival Theater
will feature a double bill by
William Shakespeare, con-
sisting of Titus Andronicus
and The Comedy of Errors
(May 12 to Oct. 27).
Kiss Me Kate, the musical
version of Shakespeare's Tam-
ing of the Shrew, will be at the
Festival Theater from May 6
to Oct. 29.
The comedy, The Shoe-
maker's Holiday will be per-
formed July 25 to Oct. 28.
Two of Shakespeare's plays
will be shown at the Festival's
Avon Theater: A Midsummer
Night's Dream (May 17 to
Oct. 28), and Henry V(May 16
to Oct. 27).
The Avon Theater will also
host Anton Chekhov's Three
Sisters (May 15 to Aug. 20),
Tennessee William's Cat on a
Hot Tin Roof (Aug. 23 to Oct.
29), and The Relapse (July 26
to Oct. 28) by Sir John
Vanbrugh.
Only Shakespeare play will
be seen at the Third Stage

Theater, The Lunatic, The
Lover and The Poet (Sept. 6 to
13).
Another one-man presenta-
tion at the Third Stage will be
Guthrie on Guthrie (Sept. 6 to
10), based on Tyrone
Guthrie's autobiography, A
Life In The Theater. Also at
the Third Stage this year is
The Changeling (June 15 to
Sept. 2) by Thomas Middleton
and William Rowley.
A special lunchtime theater
presentation at the Third

Shakespeare
festival through
Oct. 29.

Stage will be seen through
the month of August,
Chekhov's one-act comedy,

The Proposal. The Proposal

will run Thursday and Friday
at 12:10.
Backstage tours of the
Festival Theater stage, the
wardrobe and workshops, are
held every Sunday morning.
Talking Theater, another pro-
gram, schedules discussion
groups which focus on themes
of the season.
The Playbill Package has
three different options where
discounts range from 10 per-
cent to 20 percent.
Rush seats are available
from 9 a.m. on the day of the
performance. ❑

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