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April 28, 1989 - Image 145

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-04-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Asti
ofivw•s0 An Unforgettable Birthday Present

Each month in this space,
L'Chayim will present a Yiddish
lesson entitled, "Du Redst Yiddish?
(Do You Speak Yiddish?)," whose
aim is to encourage further study of
Yiddish. The lesson will include a
brief story 'utilizing the Yiddish
words to be studied, a vocabulary
list with English translations and a
family activity which involves using
the new words. Two books which
may be helpful for beginning
Yiddish students are Yiddish for
Beginners by Dr. Joffen and Der
Yiddisher Lerer by Goldin.
Weinreich's English-Yiddish
Dictionary also may be useful. At
the conclusion of each lesson will
be a suggested list of books for
persons who wish to further their
knowledge.
The lessons were prepared by
Mary Koretz of Oak Park. She has
taught both children's and adult
classes in Yiddish at the Workmen's
Circle.
Following is this month's
lesson:
My birthday is May 14. I zog
that, at the outset, veil the date is
important.
In our family, we never
celebrated geburtsteg. My father
saw no saychl in being rewarded
for breathing for "x" number of
yorn. It was noch all an automatic
act requiring kein effort; hardly a
dergraychung. There was no
disputing the logic chotsh I longed
for some recognition afile
celebration of my birth.
On May 14, 1948, fate
intervened and hot gegebn me a
birthday present beyond compare.
Israel was derkont as a medina.
The party that followed on May
zechtsin was breathtakingly yom-
tovdik. It was held at the Central
High Athletic Field and 22,000
mentshn were in attendance.
Congressman Coffin and Pat
MacNamara of the American
Federation of Labor hobn geredt
tsu the group. I felt such exhiliration
as if I were floating above the oylm
in a hot luft balloon. My children,
Julie who was finf years of age and
Guy, who was drei, were floating
with me. I was delighted to have
them be aydes to this historic event.
Imagine 2,000 years of "Next year
in Yerusholeim!" and I lived to see
the nes. Surely, dos more than
made up for fir un dreisik years of
no birthday simches. It never
occurred to me that there were
toyznter of people born on Mei 14.
Efsher some were present in the

crowd. It was my birthday, my Israel,
my party. None has ever matched it,
kein ever will.

Vocabulary

zog
veil
geburtsteg
saychl
yorn
noch
kein
dergraychung
chotsh
afile

say
because
birthdays
reason
years
after
none
achievement
although
even

hot gegebn
derkont
medina
zechtsin
yom-tovdik
mentshn
hobn geredt tsu

oylm
luft
finf
drei
aydes
Yerusholeim
nes
dos

gave
recognized
state
16
festive
people
addressed
(talked to)
crowd
air
five
three
witness
Jerusalem
miracle
this

fir
un
dreisik
simches
toyznter
Mei
efsher

four
and
30
celebrations
thousands
May (the month)
maybe

Family Activity

Join in with some community
activity celebrating Israel
Independence Day or have an Israel
birthday party at home.

„0,00:1/1/14 :14 Dishes For An Israeli Dinner

C

Do you have a favorite kosher
recipe? Each month in this space,
L'Chayim will print kosher recipes
that the whole family can prepare
together. To contribute to the
column, type your recipe on 8 1 /2x11"
paper and send it to L'Chayim, c/o
The Jewish News, 20300 Civic
Center Dr., Southfield 48076.

This month's recipes were
contributed by Norma Schonwetter,
cooking columnist and microwave
cooking teacher.
Israeli cuisine is marked by the
multitude of ethnic cultures brought
by the immigrants from other parts
of the world. It is made up of spicy
Hungarian dishes, delicate Viennese
pastries, Greek appetizers and
Middle East dishes, among others.
Our Israeli menu consists of
Herbed Pita Appetizer, which can
also be served as a bread substitute
with a main dish; followed by Jaffa
Chicken, Bulgar Pilaf, a finely
chopped vegetable salad and a
fresh fruit dessert.

Herbed Pita
Appetizer

1 (8-inch) pita bread
1 tbsp. margarine
1/8 tsp. garlic powder
1/2 tsp. leaf oregano or marjoram
1 tbsp. grated parmesan cheese
In a microproof custard cup or
small bowl microwave margarine on
high for 30 seconds or until melted.
Stir in garlic powder. Split pita in
half to form two rounds. Brush the
insides and melted margarine

mixture. Sprinkle with oregano and
grated cheese. Place on paper
towels and microwave on high 1 1/2
minutes. Cut each circle into 6
wedges; let cool to crisp. Can be
reheated, if desired. Makes 12
wedges.

Jaffa Chicken

1/2 cup chopped onion
1 lb. boneless chicken breasts,
skinned
1/4 tsp. seasoned salt
1/4 tsp. paprika
1/8 tsp. pepper
3/4 cup orange juice
1 tbsp. brown sugar
2 tbsps. honey
1 tsp. orange zest or grated orange
rind
1 tbsp. cornstarch
1 cup orange sections

Place onion in an 8-inch
microproof square baking dish.
Microwave, covered, on high 2
minutes or until soft. Top onions
with chicken breasts. Combine salt,
paprika and pepper, sprinkle over
chicken pieces. In a 2-cup
microproof measure or bowl,
combine orange juice, brown sugar,
honey, orange zest and cornstarch.
Whisk together to dissolve
cornstarch. Microwave, uncovered,
on high 2 minutes or until boiling,
stirring once. Pour over chicken.
Cover, microwave 5 minutes. Add
orange sections. Microwave,
covered, on high for 1 1/2 to 2
minutes or until chicken is cooked
through. Serve on rice or bulghur,

garnished with toasted sliced
almonds. Serves 4.

Bulghur Pilaf

Bulghur Pilaf is an excellent
accompaniment for meat and
poultry. Try it instead of rice or
stuffing for a new taste sensation.
Bulghur is cracked wheat, high in
fiber and nutrients with a delicious
nutty flavor. It can be found in
health food stores or the health food
department of your supermarket.
2 tbsps. pareve margarine
1/3 cup crushed fine egg noodles
1 cup course bulghur
2 cups hot tap water
2 tsps. instant low sodium chicken
bouillon granules
dash salt, optional
pepper to taste

In a 1 1/2-quart microproof
casserole, microwave margarine and
noodles, covered, on high until
noodles are a light, golden brown,
about 3 minutes; stir halfway
through cooking. Add bulghur to
browned noodles; mix well to coat
each grain with margarirne. Add
water, bouillon, salt and dash of
pepper; stir and cover. Microwave
on high 3 minutes or until mixture
boils. Microwave on medium low (30
percent) for 6-7 minutes or until
broth is absorbed. With fork, lightly
stir and add salt to taste; let stand.
Serves 5-6. Tip: To double this
recipe, use a 3-quart casserole and
increase all microwave cooking time
by 1 1/2.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

L-5

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