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April 14, 1989 - Image 68

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-04-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I FOOD

I

REMEMBER TO BUY AND USE
BREDE HORSERADISH ...

for Passover. The only Horseradish
made fresh in Detroit. Don't
accept substitutes. Look for
the BREDE name on the label

Eggs Are A Staple,
Especially On Passover

100 0/0 PURE
HORSERADISH

CHAIM BERMANT

Special to The Jewish News

Vresti Ground

Fresh Ground

Aso:IA(3 6h

Roc: .

; AP AND SALT

KEEP

REFRIGERATED

KEEP lEffitiOERATED

NET WT. 81/2 OZ.
gEnt-,Nr f)f • kA.:7H 48223

"or 7

,-,!HsERAD 15"

,,NEGAP! AND SALT

Fresh k,;;rotind
,.f<PsERAa's'4

KOSHER

Hop ABONiM
MiCHIGAN

ANL?

1.

aZtfs iftliGtfeATIT)

NET . WT, 8,/2 OZ.

,

..*223

KOS HER

mourzi

T HOP ABONIM
t) MEC,H.OiN

$38 0 0 1 2 £

KOSHER
Hon AtIoNlm

£430 00 2 i01-

Available in
pure white or
beet flavor,
Passover Kosher.

BREDE, INC.
19000 Glendale Ave.
Detroit, Michigan

Dist. by DETROIT CITY DAIRY, INC.
868-5511

OAK PARK LAUNDRY
RE-OPENS

13835 W. 9 Mile
Oak Park, MI
541-7623

TDREr

COUNTRY CORNERS

13 MILE ROAD AT SOUTHFIELD ROAD

SOUTHEAST CORNER ON 13 MILE RD. SIDE

647.4646

WISHES ITS CUSTOMERS AND FRIENDS
A VERY HEALTHY AND HAPPY
PASSOVER

68

FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 1989

Table Cloth and
Flat Work is
our Specialty.

Mon.-Fri. 8-5
Sat. 9:30-2.30
Closed Sunday

I

don't know if any egg-
eaters in Israel have
gone down with
salmonella poisoning, but
there's been quite an
epidemic of it in England and
people have been talking
about little else.
I used to think that
salmonella poisoning was
something people got from a
surfeit of smoked salmon, and
served them right too, but
who would have believed that
one could catch it from
something as innocent as an
egg?
I not only go to work on an
egg (in-so-far as I go to work
at all), I go to sleep on an egg,
which is to say I like to whisk
up the yellow of an egg with
hot milk and a drop (well,
maybe two drops) of brandy.
An excellent soporific, I may
say, works like a sermon.
The egg is a staple Jewish
food and enters in one guise
or another into every Jewish
dish you could name, and
quite a few you couldn't, if on-
ly because it's the poor folks'
protein. Those who couldn't
afford fish or flesh usually
had a chicken or two scrat-
ching around in the backyard
so they could always be sure
of an egg.
Thus one finds eggs in chop-
ped herring and eggs in chop-
ped liver and in cholent and
kugel and galuptzi and
borscht and lokschen pudding
and latkes and kreplach and
kneidlech and kichel and
fishnoggs (known otherwise
as calfs foot jelly or p'tcha),
and, of course, egg and onions,
and eingemachtes.
(I don't know what
eingemachtes is, or are, but I
can't imagine it, or them be-

Chaim Bermant is an author
and humorist.

ing made without eggs
because Jewish cooking sans
eggs isn't Jewish, which is
perhaps why so many Jews
are egg-shaped).
I should imagine that the
average Jew consumes at
least 20 eggs in one form or
the other in the course of an
average week, but when it
comes to the Passover holiday
the number must be nearer a
hundred, and I know whereof
I speak, for I am an expert in
and devotee of matzah-brei
which should really be called
matzah-fry. A good brei calls
for at least one egg per square
foot of matzah and a sizeable

I suppose eggs are
particularly useful
on Passover
because they are
about the only
food that does not
have to be
licensed by the
rabbinate.

family can go through about
an acre of matzah-brei. In the
course of the festival, a fami-
ly could consume something
like 4,840 eggs.
One also uses prodigious
quantities of eggs in matzah-
balls, matzah pudding and a
delightfully light souffle of
my wife's making which I call
matzah-do-about-nothing.
There is also, of course, the
egg in salt water which one
eats at the Seder dinner and
which makes a rather
delicious hors d'oeuvre. (I
have tried eating it at other
times ad it's quite tasteless; I
suspect it seems delicious at
the Seder because after the
long haul through the Hag-
gadah almost anything would
seem delicious.)

I suppose eggs are par-
ticularly useful on Passover

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