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April 14, 1989 - Image 37

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-04-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Studio In Harvard Row Mall
<-?-

agree with the analyses of the
Jaffee Center and Military
Intelligence. Israel's main
problem is that Yassir Arafat
doesn't have full control over
the PLO, Ofra says. "There
are other leaders who are
pure terrorists. But all the
same, we should sit down. It
can't go on like this."
"The only way is to talk to
them and try to get to know
them a little bit," says Sarit.
"The solution is not to send
soldiers and blow up their
houses!'
"That did not solve our pro-
blems for a whole year," Ofra
adds. "It made it worse."
The United States should
try to convince Israel's
leaders to talk to the PLO, ac-
cording to Sarit. Says Ofra:

"The Americans should help
us talk to the Palestinians.
They should help us find a
common language and then
they should leave us alone."
Murad, an Israeli Arab,
says now is the suitable time
to reach peace. The people
need to push the _ Israeli
government into negotia-
tions, he says. And Shamir
needs to change his ideas,
although, Murad admits,
such a metamorphosis would
be difficult to achieve.
He has an answer for Israeli
Jews who say that the Arabs
can't be trusted to adhere to
agreements. Noting that it
was the 10th anniversary of
Israel's peace treaty with
Egypt, he says, "You think
Egypt is not a good exam-
ple?"



Radio, Matzah-Baking
Are Signs Of Pesach

DAVID LANDAU

Special to The Jewish News

W

ith radio jingles in-
cessantly advertis-
ing cleaning pro-
ducts, no one in Israel can be
unaware of the advent of the
Pesach festival.
For most Israeli Jews, even
non-observant ones, the
biblical precept that "for
seven days there shall be no
leaven found in your houses"
is the excuse for a thorough
spring cleaning.
Jerusalem, even in the
1980s, still echoes with carpet
beating at this time of year.
Balconies are full of clothes
being aired and books are be-
ing shaken free of dust and
bread crumbs.
One barometer of the
season can also be seen in
some supermarkets, where
the prices of floor washes,
oven sprays and furniture
polish have been slashed. But
some items go up in cost at
Passover time, raising the
question of whether the holi-
day costs are inflated.
Marlene, chief cashier at a
Jerusalem branch of the Coop
Supermarket chain, said this
week's prices are generally no
higher for .Pesach than the
rest of the year.
Many employers and work
committees try to ease the
financial burden of the holi-
day with cash grants and gifts
and even payment of an extra
half-month's salary for the
festival.
The biggest product of the
season, of course, is matzah.
The standard five-and-a-half-
pound brown paper package
of matzot costs just over $5 at
the Coop Supermarket chain,

whereas better packaged
matzot in cellophane bags
within cardboard boxes cost
exactly double.
But many of Israel's ultra-
Orthodox community are not
satisfied with regular, square,
machine-baked matzot. The
Ger Hasidim have already
ordered their round hand-
baked matzah from Moshav
Komemiyut at $20 a kilo (2.2
pounds), with a higher price
for the matzot made of hand-
ground flour.
The Lubavitch Hasidim at
Kfar Habad have been steadi-
ly producing their smaller,
round hand-baked matzot for
some weeks now — but most
of those will be given out free
in packages of three ready for
the seder — to soldiers and
public figures.
Some ultra-Orthodox Jews
prefer to bake their own mat-
zot, trusting only themselves
to ensure the flat loaves will
be perfectly kosher for
Pesach.
Yeshayahu, a Jerusalem
rabbi, already has his matzot
stored away carefully in a top
closet in his apartment. He
baked them two weeks ago
with a group of learned
friends at a matzah bakery in
Bnei Brak.
One of the group drew the
pure water for the dough from
a spring, and kneaded and
rolled the dough together for
no more than 18 minutes to
prevent it form rising. Their
matzot were the first in the
oven that day so there was no
danger of contamination from
bits of left-over dough from
previous batches.
Other ethnic communities
also prefer to bake their own
matzot.

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THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

37

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