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April 07, 1989 - Image 63

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-04-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I COOKING

Passover Goes
Low Cholesterol

LESLYE MICHLIN BORDEN

Special to the Jewish News

E

ach year, the head of
the household starts
the Passover seder by
holding up a piece of matzah,
saying, "This is the bread of
our affliction, which our
ancestors ate in the land of
Egypt." More than any other
holiday, Passover, which
begins on the evening of April
19, is surrounded by food
traditions and observances.
Most of them are related to
matzah.
Matzah must be eaten on
Passover. It recalls that the
Jews, fleeing Pharaoh's
slavery in ancient Egypt, had
no time to let their bread rise.
They quickly mixed flour and
water and then baked flat
loaves in the sun. Modern

methods of preparing matzah
are not too different. The
practice is limited by strict
regulations regarding the
growing of the wheat and its
grinding into flour. Even the
water used to mix with this
special flour is guarded
against the unwelcome intru-
sion of any foreign matter
that might act as a leavening
agent. Matzah is one item not
recommended for preparing
in the home.
The requirement that
nothing containing leavening
be eaten during this eight-
day observance has strongly
influenced Jewish cooking for
it. Trying to follow these stric-
tures for many Jews means
not eating any foods that ex-
pand, like beans, rice, or len-
tils. It also means omitting
baking powder and soda from
the usual list of baking ingre-

dients, as well as not using
yeast.
In
fact,
observant
homemakers bake only with
a flour prepared from matzah
itself, called matzah meal, or
a finer version called cake
meal. Tradition explains that
because this flour has been
baked already, it is not at risk
of rising again. No other
flours are permitted.
These stipulations inspired
the creativity of Jewish cooks
and bakers. They developed a
wide variety of dishes based
on matzah (in any of its
forms). Some, like Matzah
Balls, are old standards.
Every cook has her own
method of making them.
Some divide the eggs, and add
the yolks and whites
separately; others mix in the
whole egg. Fried Matzah,
another traditional Passover
dish, also has several dif-
ferent preparations. Some
cooks blanche the matzah in
boiling water in a colander;
others soak it in cold water.
Recipes for Matzah Rolls and
Matzah Stuffing came about
as the result of modern cooks
trying to find variety in what
otherwise might be a monoto-
nous eight days' dining.
Nowhere is the challenge
for cooks greater than in the
preparation of desserts.
Luckily, the abundance of in-
gredients in the United
States, especially of fresh
fruits, has broadened the
dessert horizon considerably.
Cooking creatively for
Passover means figuring out
ways to use the wider variety
of ingredients within the
limitations of the holiday.
Recipes that do not rely on
rising agents, like cookies
and pies, adapt easily. Believe
it or not, Brownies, with just
a few alterations, meet all the
requirements. They can be
prepared quickly in the short
time between the morning of
the holiday, when the last
crumbs of bread are removed
from the house, and the even-
ing, when the holiday begins.
They are a welcome seder
dessert and a nice nosh
throughout the eight-day
observance.
If you prefer something a
little more elegant for the
finale of your holiday feast,
try a fruit tart. Take advan-
tage of the beautiful
strawberries just coming to
market by preparing a
Strawberry Tart, for example.
Or, make an attractive ar-
rangement of pineapple
slices, bananas and kiwis. You
can even use canned apricot

Start with the best!

None other compares with the fine flavor and
tenderness of naturally grown Empire Kosher poultry.
Special attention at every stage, from feeding and
growing to processing and packaging, ensures the
highest kosher quality possible. For holidays, and every
day, specify genuine Empire Kosher. You can taste the
difference in every tender bite!

The Most Trusted Name in Kosher Poultry and Foods 1-800-EMPIRE-4

IMPORTANT NOTICE

We wish to warn the public to beware of misleading
deli and restaurant advertisements offering food for
Passover. Many of these establishments are not under
Kosher supervision and are not Kosher.
Below is a list of food establishments producing for
Passover under supervision of the Council of
Orthodox Rabbis:

BLOOM KOSHER CATERING
DELICATE PALATE
JEWEL KOSHER CATERING
QUALITY KOSHER CATERING
SPERBER NORTH

546-5444
661-1221
661-4050
352-7758
661-5151

COUNCIL OF ORTHODOX RABBIS OF GREATER DETROIT

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

63'

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