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March 24, 1989 - Image 82

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-03-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

LIFESTYLES

• A Tradition of Excellence •

Spring
Gift Certificate

PROFILE

from

Guy Stern: German Scholar

• • a

FRANKLIN
CLUB APARTMENTS

CARLA JEAN SCHWARTZ

Local Columnist

1:4.6

given annually on Goethe's birthday,
March 22. The second accomplishment
involves Stephen Goodell, a colleague,
Nancy Bolt, the head librarian of the
state of Colorado and myself. We put
together an exhibit called 'The Nazi
Book Burning and the American
Response.' Now we have a planning
grant to make that a traveling exhibit
throughout the United States."
PHILOSOPHY: "I measure a human life
in terms of beneficial achievements that
advance the well being and enjoyment
of the human race."

An Adult Community

28301 Franklin Rd., Southfield, MI 48034

353-2810

Activities, Utilities
Transportation, Country Store
Beauty Salon, Wellness Center,
Dietician, Worship Service,
Greenhouse, Companionship,
Optional Meals & Mail Service

I

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For Free Vertical Blinds
and Installation

Selection Available

I
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Applicable to New Tenants Only

Expires April 30, 1989

• A Tradition of Excellence •

I
I
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I
I

Illimminumammummtutmmll

THE JULIUS CHAJES
MUSIC FUND j5
CONCERT SERIES

1988 — 1989

Season
e tr:, 4,1%

SUNDAY, APRIL 2, 1989 at 3 P.M.

SHEILA FIEKOWSKY

Violinist

Admission: $7; Members: $6; Senior Adults & Students: $5
J.C.C./Maple Drake Bldg.

For ticket information call Annette Chafes
661-1000

82

FRIDAY, MARCH 24, 1989

NAME: Guy Stern
AGE: 67
OCCUPATION: Distinguished professor of
German at Wayne State University in
the Department of Romance and
Germanic Languages and Literature.
RESIDENCE: Southfield
FAMILY: He is married to Judith
Edelstein Owens, a lawyer and high
school teacher at Kimball High School
in Royal Oak. His son, Mark, lives in
Cincinnati and works for a
pharmaceutical company.
EDUCATION: He was graduated from
Soldan High School in St. Louis, Mo.;
baccalaureate degree from Hofstra
University; M.A. and Ph.D. degrees
from Columbia University.
SYNAGOGUE: Congregation T'Chiyah
ORGANIZATIONS: Executive committee of
American Jewish Committee and Leo
Baeck Institute; secretary of Kurt Weill
Foundation for Music; chairman of
Academic Advisory Committee and
board member of Holocaust Memorial
Center, West Bloomfield.
FAVORITE BOOK: Tom Jones by Henry
Fielding and Journey to Italy by Goethe.
HOBBIES: "Creative writing beyond
academics. I call it finger exercises."
LATEST ACCOMPLISHMENT: "I was just
awarded the Goethe medal for North
America by the president of the Federal
Republic (of Germany) and the
International Goethe Institute. It's

BACKGROUND: Guy Stern was born in
1922 in Hildesheim, Germany. His
parents, Julius and Hedwig, were in the
textile business.
At age 15, he was able to obtain an
affidavit from his uncle in St. Louis and
an affidavit from a Jewish children's
committee enabling him to leave
Germany. "Anyone who could get out,
got out," recalls Stern. His parents and
siblings subsequently perished in the
Warsaw Ghetto.
About 15 years- ago Stern was
reading the book Why Six Million Died
and came across the name of the consulate
member, who validated his affidavit. The
book revealed how the American consulate
in Hamburg was very lenient compared to
other cities. "I knew then that if I lived
in Stuttgart, I'd be dead; but living near
Hamburg, I'm being interviewed."
In St. Louis, Stern lived with his
aunt and uncle, Ethel and Benno
Silberberg. He attended high school and
got odd jobs working in restaurants and
hotels. He began taking classes at St.
Louis University.
In 1942, he was inducted into the
U.S. Army. He participated in the
Normandy invasion and visited
Buchenwald the day after its liberation.
In the army he was sent to the
military intelligence center and was
trained as a prisoner of war interrogator
because of his command of the German
language. He once interrogated a
person, who was in his athletic club,
from his hometown. "It was the kind of
interview that you know so much about
a person, that they are astonished."
Stern waited until darkness before he
interrogated him. He received the
Bronze Star for his intelligence work
from Gen. Courtney Hodges, the
commander of the First Army.
After the war, he went to New York
because he had a chance for a
newspaper career with Shepard Stone of
the New York Times, his superior
intelligence officer from the war. When
that didn't materialize, he entered
Hofstra and then Columbia University
for graduate work in the German

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