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March 24, 1989 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-03-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

LOOKING BACK

WHAT TO DO WHEN MOM OR DAD
IS MORE THAN JUST FORGETFUL?

The Answer Is

A Decade Later:
The Cold Peace Holds

CANTERBURY LANE at
PEACHWOOD INN

HELEN DAVIS

Foreign Correspondent

A Special Care Unit for Alzheimer's Patients

Canterbury Lane offers programs and
activities for adults suffering from
Alzheimer's Disease and other related
disorders in a caring, secure and
beautiful setting. In this home environ-
ment, innovative programming en-
courages each resident to maintain as
much independence as possible.

• 24 hour supervised care
• Individualized attention by staff specially trained to
respond to each resident's needs
• Focused activities to help prevent wandering
• Relearning of familiar skills
• Medical care by physicians and licensed nurses
• Guidance in dressing, eating and personal hygiene
• Recreational, Social and Educational activities
• Music and Pet Therapy
• Day Trips

Canterbury Lane has innovative, supervised programs 24 hours
daily. Self-contained, it has its own living, dining and kitchen
facilities exclusively for the use of residents and their families.
Families are encouraged to join and assist the staff in the
development of care plans and activities for their family
member. A variety of accommodations are available from which
to choose; and meals, linens and housekeeping are included.
Should the resident require more intensive medical care, ac-
commodations can be arranged in Peachwood Inn, a basic and
skilled health care facility.

PEACHWOOD INN

3500 W. South Blvd.
(313) 852.7800

Minutes From Downtown
Birmingham

KOSHER MEALS AVAILABLE

20

FRIDAY, MARCH 24, 1989

SOUTH BLV D

SOUAR

BLOOMFIELD
HILLS

UN

I - 75

TROY

2

LUG BEAVER

16 MILE

BIRMINGHAM

BEVERLY
HILLS

ROYAL
OAK

FERNDALE

ust ten years ago — on
March 26, 1979 — Pres-
ident Jimmy Carter,
President Anwar Sadat and
Prime Minister Menachem
Begin gathered before 1,50.0
spectators on the front lawn
of the White House to sign a
peace treaty between Israel
and Egypt.
For Begin, it was the third
most significant day of his
life, after the establishment of
the Jewish state and the
reunification of Jerusalem in
the 1967 Six Day War.
For the overwhelming ma-
jority of Israelis, it was simp-
ly a moment of sublime
deliverance: Israel, under
threat of war since its foun-
ding 30 years earlier, was
finally breaking out of its
claustrophobic cage, making
peace with its largest, most
powerful enemy.
The unalloyed joy was also
pregnant with promise. Israel
would, for the first time, have
normal relations with a
neighboring state: open
borders, trade opportunities,
cultural and scientific ex-
changes, agricultural
cooperation.
Moreover, after Egypt had
done the unthinkable and
broken what President Sadat
had described as the
"psychological barrier," it
seemed that nothing was im-
possible; that nothing could
stop the bandwagon of peace.
Given this new reality, other
moderate Arab states would
surely adjust their political
vision, accept the fact of
Israel's existence and follow
the Egyptian example.
Those few Israelis who were
skeptical of Egypt's inten-
tions — who believed that
President Sadat's signature
on the peace treaty was no
more than • a tactical ploy
designed to regain the Sinai
Desert and improve Egypt's
overall strategic position —
were regarded as party-
poopers, their voices drowned
out in the euphoric hoopla.
In fact, neither the pro-
phesy of a Golden Age nor
that of doom and disaster
have been vindicated. The
reality lies trapped uncomfor-
tably somewhere in between.
On the one hand, Egypt has
reaffirmed its commitment to
an older treaty which
obligates it to join other Arab
states who consider
themselves threatened, thus
holding open the door to the
possibility that it will join

j

some future Arab war coali-
tion against Israel.
On the other, 10 years after
the signing on the White
House lawn, after both Presi-
dent Sadat and Prime
Minister Begin have left the
scene, the peace treaty re-
mains intact.
It does, to be sure, remain
an empty vessel, devoid of
content and substance, but
Israel's deep disappointment
at the lack of warmth is
tempered by the knowledge
that, having been tested in a
fiery crucible, the treaty has
survived at all.
This disillusionment was
compounded last week when
Israel returned Taba, the bit-

The single factor
that unites all
three disparate
groups in Egypt is
their opposition to
the peace treaty.

terly contested sliver of Red
Sea beach, to Egyptian
sovereignty.
Taba, President Hosni
Mubarak had insisted, was
"holy Egyptian soil" and, not-
withstanding the peace trea-
ty, there could not be a full
normalization of relations un-
til Israel handed back this
last scrap of the Sinai Desert.
The day after the formal
transfer, however, Egypt an-
nounced a fresh claim to
sovereignty: the Coptic sec-
tion of the of the Ho-
ly Sepulcher, traditional site
of the crucifixion of Jesus, in
the heart of the Old City of
Jerusalem.
According to Dr. Rafi
Israeli, a leading Middle East
specialist at the Hebrew
University of Jerusalem, the
state of relations between
Jerusalem and Cairo a decade
after the signing of the peace
treaty "is hardly what I was
hoping for."
"After making tremendous
concessions, it is not the sort
of unconditional peace I ex-
pected," he told me. "To that
extent I am deeply disap-
pointed."
He notes that there is vir-
tually no trade between
Egypt and Israel, and that
whatever bilateral agree-
ments exist between the two
states have been accomplish-
ed at Israel's initiative.
While the border is open
and more than 30,000 Israelis
visited Egypt last year, there
is no reciprocity as the Egyp-
Continued on Page 22

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