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March 17, 1989 - Image 62

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-03-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE BERKSHIRE HILTON IS
REASON ENOUGH TO RETREAT
TO ANN ARBOR THIS WEEKEND.

ONLY

Of course, so are the antique shows,
the art museums and the shopping

A weekend in Ann Arbor is a roman-



'Os

\\
s ts s` •••.•>,



The Berkshire is a place for the two of you to create magic moments
to remember.

Our piano bar sets the mood for your
intimate dinner in the Polo Club.

$

58

tic interlude. Nestled in the Berkshire
Hilton, the two of you. Surrounded
in elegance, served with grace.
Venture out to the galleries, the
theaters, the shops and the antique
shows in Saline.
Retreat to the luxurious privacy of
your guestroom at the Berkshire. It's
like residing in a fine estate home. Later,
you'll enjoy the convenience of 24-hour
room service, a whirlpool or sauna, or a
few laps in our resort-sized indoor pool.
Come taste what happens when our
renowned European Chef Wally turns
his genius to American cuisine. You'll
find your favorite dishes have taken
on a whole new pizzazz
Visit the Polo Lounge where
the sizzling sounds of Art Stephan's
piano provide the background for
an exciting evening.
So much to do, and the whole
luxurious weekend to do it. We have
even extended the check-out time to
3:00 p.m. on Sunday so you can enjoy
our sumptuous brunch. Call Sylvia at
761-7800 today to take advantage of
our extraordinary weekend rates. Be
sure to ask about our other deluxe
and family weekend packages.
Then, come to Ann Arbor and re-
member how romantic a weekend can
really be.

THE BERKSHIRE HILTON

OF ANN ARBOR

Luxury within your reach.

STATE STREET AT 1-94

313/761-7800

'Per room. per night
Room rate only Subject to availability Not
available for groups. Offer expires 12-3040

You can find your heart's desire in the shops, boutiques
and stores minutes from the Berkshire.

HOSTED IN THE FINE TRADITION OF
ERIC YALE LUTZ & ASSOCIATES

NOW TWO LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU

OCEANIA INN

Walton Blvd., & Adams, Rochester Hills
1 /4 Mile From Meadow Brook Theatre

OCEANIA INN •
Walton
Meadow Brook
Theatre

Oakland University



THE PANDA

Drake & Walnut Lake Rd.
West Bloomfield
1 Mile From Jewish Community Center

Blvd.

<

Walnut
THE PANDA •



375-9200
Reservations

Maple

Jewish Community
Center

and Carry-Out

6- co

Lake Rd.

661-1503
Reservations

and Carry-Out

BOTH FEATURING THE FINEST IN SZECHUAN, CANTONESE & HONG KONG .. .
plus Elegant Gourmet Cuisine ... 7 Days AWeek . . . Also Cocktail Hour
-

SUNDAY FAMILY BUFFET

ALL-YU-CAN-EAT . . . 12 noon to 4 p.

9-COURSE ROYAL GOURMET DINNER . . .

• By Reservation Only

6 person minimum . . . S 1 7 50 per person
• Menu Changes Monthly

PRIVATE PARTY FACILITIES FOR ALL OCCCASIONS

EAT HEALTHY. TRUE AUTHENTIC CHINESE COOKING WITH
NATURAL FLAVORING AND VEGETABLE OIL

Advertising in The Jewish News Gets Results
Place Your Ad Today. Call 354-6060

62

FRIDAY, MARCH 17, 1989

Adrian Blue portrays the barber in King of Hearts.

Ex-Detroiter To Appear
In Theater Of Deaf

SUSAN LUDMER-GLIEBE

Special to The Jewish News

T

he National Theatre of
the Deaf is a national
treasure. In its 21-year
history it has created a
dramatic form all its own. It
has given performances in
every state and has toured
throughout Europe and Asia
several times. Its artistic ad-
visory board reads like a
who's who of American
theater with names like Joel
Grey, Alan Arkin, Chita
Rivera, Jason Robards, Peter
Sellars. The theater has
garnered its share of ac-
colades and awards.
But as fine as these
achievements are, when it
comes right down to it the
best measure of its success is
based on simpler things.
"Almost every night we
receive a standing ovation,"
says former Detroiter Marcia
Tilchin, 27, who recently join-
ed the company and knows
how special that is. "The au-
dience is very moved." Adrian
Blue, who's been with the
theater since 1976, expresses
it a little differently. "We
knock them out," he says,
through his interpreter, Jane
Murphy.
Tilchin and Blue and the
rest of the company will be in
Ann Arbor this weekend in
conjunction with a conference,
held at the University of
Michigan and opened to the
public, called "Staged Hands:
Sign Language Translation
in the Theater." The National
Theatre will pea-form King of
Hearts, based on the Phillippe
de Broca film. The story, bit-
tersweet and allegorical, is,
about madness and sanity,
reality and illusion.
As with all NTD produc-
tions, which have run the
gamut from Shakespeare's
works to The Iliad and Our
Town, the play is an adapta-

tion specially and uniquely
created to utilize the ensem-
ble's strengths and imagina-
tion. "Every different type of
play has its own challenge, its
own quality," says Blue. "You
have to give it your full
energy and attention."
King of Hearts lacked a
script; but that wasn't pro-
blematical for the troupe.
They found it an occasion for
runaway creativity.
"The members of the
theater watched the movie
several times," says Tilchin.
"Everyone improvised and
came up with ideas." One of

Marcia Tilchin appears in the
current National Theatre of the
Deaf production.

the more ingenious ideas the
group devised: the scenery is
painted by one of the actors as
the narrative unfolds and
develops.

As with all NTD produc-
tions, the play uses two
languages — visual (sign) and
aural. For King of Hearts the
cast created its own theatrical
variations of signs for certain
words. A new sign was
chosen, for example, to best
represent the concept of the
word knight, whichis used ex-
tensively in the production.
One hand becomes the visor,

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