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March 17, 1989 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-03-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I ON CAMPUS

JOSC
HC

Michigan Daily

Continued from preceding page

Exciting Brilliant Diamonds
The Finest Expression of Love

the Arab uprising in the West
Bank and Gaza.
"All of a sudden South
Africa is out and the Palesti-
nians are in," Cibul said. "It's
like the occupation just hap-
pened."
Tagar's approach is to
counter negative publicity by

implementing pro-Israel pro-
grams. Later this month, the
group will hold a "Proud lb
Be a Zionist" day.
The hostility on campus is
obvious. Less visible is
Salaam-Shalom, a group of
Jewish and Arab students
who meet regularly and

Zogby: Middle East
Debate Is Necessary

ELIZABETH KAPLAN

Features Editor

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The painful result is injury to the muscles, ligaments, nerves and on
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not have any broken bones. When a bone is broken it heals with bone
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or even years before the problem shows itself. But, by then, it may be too late to prevent your
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20

FRIDAY, MARCH 17, 1989

J

times Zogby has at
least 24 congressmen
in his "I'm really with
you guys" club. They are
men, he said, who privately
support Palestinians but
have been "intimidated and
harrassed" into voting
pro-Israel.
Yet Zogby, executive direc-
tor of the Arab-American In-
stitute in Washington, D.C.,
is optimistic. While "a dead-
ly silence about the Middle
East" has prevailed in the
United States, "the dam
that has held back criticism
of Israel and its policies for
decades has been broken" by
the intifada.
Zogby, speaking last week
at the University of
Michigan, said dialogue
about the Middle East is
vital. He said college
students everywhere are
becoming more conscious
about the Middle East. At
U-M, interest in the Palesti-
nians has come to the
forefront because of several
recent editorials published
in the student newspaper,
The Michigan Daily, he said.
The editorials equated
Zionism with racism, said
Israel resettled Ethiopian
Jews only to push Palesti-
nians off the land, and
claimed Israel could be
responsible for the Dec. 21
bombing of Pan Am Flight
103.
Zogby said that he would
not have written the
editorials and that they
clearly provoke Jewish
students and cause them
pain. "But it's only painful
because we never talk about
it," he said.
'Zogby rejected assertions
by Jewish students that the
editorials are anti-Semitic.
"It's not anti-Semitic to
point out that there is a fun-
damental, proven racism in
Israel today just as it is not
anti-American to point out
that there is racism in
America today."
He also said Jewish
students' criticism of the
Palestine Liberation

James Zogby: Free expression.

Organization's policy and
politics is not anti-Arab.
"Free expression must
reign," he said. "If there
cannot be free expression on
college campuses, where can
there be free expression?"
Yet he cautioned that
debate "must take place
within certain limits of
tolerance." He singled out
Jewish assertions that the
Daily editorials represented
"Jew-baiting" as "a bit steep
as a charge."
Zogby made many
remarks critical of Israel
and Jewish organizations
during his talk. He said he
had been the target of at-
tacks by the American
Israel Public Affairs Com-
mittee (AIPAC) and the
American Jewish Congress.
He said groups like the
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith mistakenly
define criticism of Israel as
anti-Semitism.
One student in the au-
dience asked Zogby if, in ad-
dition to his litany of
criticism of Israel and
Jewish groups, he could cite
any mistakes Palestinians
made.
Zobgy replied, "The defin-
ed armed struggle, while it
served an internal purpose,
not only did not make sense,
it did not work and was
destructive!' ❑

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