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March 10, 1989 - Image 70

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-03-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ENTERTAINMENT

ATP"

WFELM\WAcN'i•IS

Yards and Yards
of BRUNCH

Each Sunday 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Press en 'al Perch

Sauteed fresh lake perch. Delicate, light, flavorful. An
enduring house specialty of the Kingsley for nearly SO
years. Twice presented in national pride at the Presidential
"Taste of America" in Washington, D.C. Join us for dinner
soon and say, "Perch, please."

$1295

per person

$

6 95
Children 12 and under

Reservations Suggested

Private Parties up to 200

350.2000

Kingsiep Inn

Woodward at Long Lake Road Bloomfield Hills
313-642-0100

Q!4)

D

ORDER YOUR
GREEN BAGELS
NOW

AT ANY OF OUR
5 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS

DETROIT
BAGEL FACTORIES

Main Office: 641-9188

The Best in Dining

CARL'S

CHOP
HOUSE

10-4#'""

3020 Grand River 833-0700
Free Parking
Nationally known for serving 4-H Prize Blue Ribbon

Steak and Chops. Finest Seafood and Liquors.
Private Dining Rooms for Banquets and Parties
.Servin g daily from 11:30 — Sunday from 2 p.m.

EMBASSY
itr=
SUITES
HOTEL

28100 Franklin Road
Southfield

Bruce Baum: Stand-up comedian.

Dropping a Baum
Full Of Laughter



A Positive Point
About Breast Cancer.

Now wecan see it before
you can feel it. When it's no
bigger than the- dot on this
page.
And when it's 90% cur-
able. With the best chance
of saving the breast.
The trick is catching it
early. And that's exactly
what a mammogram can do.
A mammogram is a sim-
ple x-ray that s simply the
best news yet for detecting
breast cancer. And saving
lives.
If you're over 35, ask
your doctor about
mammography.

AMERICAN
CANCER
SOCIETY'

IMF

Fine Italian Cuisine

Detroit's Premier
p Supper Club

ON JEFFERSON

Also Available For All Festive Occasions
• Indoor Valet Parking • Music! • Elegance!

7909 East Jefferson at Van Dyke 331-5450

70

FRIDAY, MARCH 10, 1989

Send Someone
Special a Gift
52 Weeks a Year.

Send a gift
subscription to

THE

JEWISH NEWS!

Jewish. News Intern

W

Give yourself the
chance of a lifetime.-

All beef
aged in
our own
coolers

STEVEN M. HARTZ

atch out, Roger Rab-
bit. There's a new
lovable hero in
town, and his name is Baby
Man, the world's only
diapered hero, who has the
power to taste trouble in the
air and transmutate into dif-
ferent animals.
Why did Bruce Baum
create such a character?
"Originally, it was just to
make a couple of twin sisters
happy in a cheap Toledo
disco," joked Baum. "Actual-
ly, I was sitting around trying
to spoof the different
superheroes, and that's how it
came up. Baby Man is a hero,
but he is not really a
superhero. Where Superman
can lift up a car, Baby Man
can probably fix a parking
ticket."
Baum, a comedian who
lives in Los Angeles, is the
star of still-to-be-released
film, The Adventures of Baby
Man, a movie he wrote and
directed.
"Originally, I was going to
law school when I went into
comedy," noted Baum. "When
I went into comedy, law
schools across the country ap-
plauded my decision."
Baum went to UCLA for
two years and played on its
football team. With hopes of

getting more time on the foot-
ball field, he transferred to
the University of California
where he received his B.A.
degree in political science.
"Well, the first day I got up
there (University of Califor-
nia), I started doing comedy,"
Baum said. "So, I didn't go
out for the team. I would go
into the library during finals
week with a washboard and a
cymbal; everybody would
stop, and I would do about five
minutes of comedy and run
out."
When he wasn't entertain-
ing his peers in the library, it
was off to medical buildings
where he would try to talk
doctors into hiring him to
entertain crowded waiting
rooms instead of having
music. "A psychiatrist told me
that I was crazy for wanting
to do that," Baum noted. "He
said I would be spreading
disease from one office to
another."
Baum went to graduate
school at UCLA and earned a
degree in film while he was
working at The Comedy Store
in Los Angeles every night. "I
was doing comedy all through
college," Baum said. "When I
started out in 1973, there
weren't comedy clubs
everywhere like there are
now?'
His first national exposure
in comedy came when he was

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