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March 03, 1989 - Image 98

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-03-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

NEWS

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Student Group Protests
Anne Pollard's Sentence

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I WOULD LIKE TO
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Rochester (JTA) — A U.S.
magistrate was expected to
decide this week whether
Anne Henderson Pollard has
been subjected to cruel and
unusual punishment by the
Federal Bureau of Prisons, or
if her medical complaints are
exaggerated to generate
public sympathy for her hus-
band, convicted spy Jonathan
Pollard.
A student group last week
protested the sentences and
demanded the release of the
Pollards at the Justice
Department in Washington.
Anne Pollard testified in
her own defense last week to
a lack of medical treatment,
and her deteriorating rela-
tionship with Dr. Martha
Grogan, medical director of
the Federal Medical Center
here, who is Pollard's treating
physician.
She suggested their rela-
tionship worsened after two
articles on her medical condi-
tion appeared in the New
York Times in the summer of
1988.
According to Pollard,
Grogan called the Times'
stories a "pack of lies" and
became 'abrupt, short and
unpleasant."
The 28-year-old Pollard said
she "would be the happiest
person in the world" if the
court allowed her to see her
private physician, who prac-
tices in Chicago.
But U.S. Attorney Robert
Small said at the hearing
that Pollard's condition had
been deteriorating long
before her imprisonment,
even when treated by doctors
with whom she had a good
relationship.
He said she received
medical treatment during 88
percent of the 709 days of in-
carceration, and had been
seen by 35 physicians, in-
cluding 22 from the Mayo
Clinic.
Small said doctors from
Mayo diagnosed her as hav-
ing irritable bowel syndrome,
a serious but relatively com-
mon ailment that is not
life-threatening.
The government argued
that Pollard has consistently
refused to be treated by doc-
tors in Rochester as an "un-
conscious desire to be ill" in
order to generate public sup-
port for a reduced sentence for
her husband.
Pollard's
attorneys,
however, claimed that the
government had "prescribed
stress" for Pollard by moving
her to hostile surroundings at

the Federal Medical Center
here.
Pollard has served more
than two years of two concur-
rent five-year sentences. She
was convicted as an accessory
after the fact in her husband's
spy activities for Israel.
Meanwhile, the North
American Jewish Sttudents'
Network has begun a move-
ment demanding the release
from prison of the Pollards
because they feel that Jewish
leaders have failed to act.
"The students started the
Soviet Jewry movement when
the Jewish community was
silent," Rabbi Avi Weiss,
chairman of the Student
Struggle for Soviet Jewry
said.
"We are starting a national
Pollard movement, and we
are demanding in front of the
Justice Department, 'Free
Pollard Now.' "
However, some major U.S.
Jewish groups have apparent-
ly been monitoring the situa-
tion.
Jess Hordes, Washington
representative of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, said his group is "con-
tinuing to monitor the situa-
tion," particular Pollard's
health.

Rabin Disputes
Death Toll

Tel Aviv (JTA) — Defense
For Children International
blames the Israel Defense
Force for the deaths of 70
Arab children — from teen-
agers to youngsters under 6
years old — during the first
year of the Palestinian upris-
ing which began in December
1987.
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin disputed the figure.
"Only 22" minors were kill-
ed, Rabin wrote in response to
a complaint by the president
of the Israeli branch of the
organization, former
Supreme Court Justice
Moshe Etzioni.
But a Defense For Children
International source in
Jerusalem questioned Rabin's
figures.
The organization has com-
piled a report on child deaths
related to the intifada, which
it says it will release official-
ly soon.
According to the source, 35
of the 70 Arab children died
from gunshot wounds, 31
from tear gas inhalation, one
from beatings and three in
other incidents.

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