100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

February 24, 1989 - Image 72

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-02-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I BEST OF EVERYTHING

Detroit Area Beef Processor
Markets Low-Fat Meat Products

DANNY RASKIN

Local Columnist

A

etaiditiAi Cafe

29566 ORCHARD LAKE RD.

Just N. of 13 Mile • Farm. Hills • 626.0804

Home-Style Family Dining • High Quality • Reasonable Prices
r
1

I COUPON 1

BUY ONE OMELETTE OR
ANY BREAKFAST ON MENU
GET SECOND AT HALF PRICE

-

MON. THRU FRI. 6:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.

L

• 1 Coupon Per Person • Expires 3-3-89

JN

J

OPEN 7 DAYS—SAT. 6:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., SUN. 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.

I

COUPON I

BAR .

yAaD
13
BeliE•
OPEN 7 DAYS
11 a.m. to 12 Mid. t



BAR-B-Q SLAB FOR 2

$ 10.95

PLA
ICE
FOR

las

INCLUDES: 2 POTATOES,
2 COLE . LAWS
AND BREAD FOR 2

BAR-B- Q CHICKEN FOR 2

.

$7.8

INCLUDES: 2 POTATOES,
2 COLE SLAWS
AND BREAD FOR 2

• 1 Coupon Per Order • Coupon Expires 3/3/89 J

TRY. OUR DAILY SPECIALS MON.-FRI. (Inquire Within)

FARMINGTON HILLS — 851-7000 I LIVONIA — 427.6500
31006 ORCHARD LAKE RD. AT 14
30843 PLYMOUTH RD. _J

I coupoN T

TAKE A FRIEND TO DINE IN "LITTLE ITALY"

$6.00 OFF DINNER FOR TWO

• Excludes Specials • Expires 3-2-89

C

JN

ITALIAN & AMERICAN CUISINE

• COCKTAILS •

UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP I

1535 CASS LAKE RD. BET. ORCHARD LAKE RD. & CASS-ELIZABETH LAKE RD.
Keego Harbor
683.2888

L

OPEN 7 DAYS — SUN.-THURS. 4 p.m.-10 p.m. • FRI. & SAT. 4 p.m.-11 p.m.

64

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1989

who survived
10 Nazi concentration
camps in three years
has brought this area the
latest rage in food . . . low-fat
meat.
Today, Markus Rothbart is
owner of Eastern Market Beef
Processing Corp. . . .
distributing the acclaimed
Limousin beef for health-
conscious people.
It is presently in numerous
Farmer Jack supermarkets
and growing immensely in
popularity.
But all wasn't so hunky-
dory for Markus, also author
of the book, I Wanted To Live
To Tell A Story . . . The food
he ate in the concentration
camps certainly wasn't meat
. . . and being surrounded by
all the beef hanging at his
plant sometimes brings
memories of those days when
he'd have given anything for
just a tiny bite.
The year of his bar mitzvah
in Poland, 1939, was also the
year that Hitler conquered
that country . . . Markus
spent his three concentration
camp years in Poland, Ger-
many, Czechoslavakia, and
Austria . . . Coming to
America from Germany in
1949, he worked in the roof-
ing business for two months,
a kosher meat market on
12th Street, a hotel and
restaurant supply house and
then into his own meat
business.
He's had Eastern Market
Beef Processing for 18 years
. . . cutting meat to specifica-
tion and deboning cattle
when requested . . . These are
the only processing Markus
does at his company . . . not as
the word would otherwise im-
ply when it comes to food.
How did' he get connected
with Limousin beef? . . .
Markus took samples and
started testing and tasting
them for fat content . . . His
vast knowledge of the meat
business from Europe and the
United States told him he
had hit on something big ..
that everything told to him
about Limousin was unbe-
lievably correct.
Recent research by Iowa
State University compared
Limousin Beef to other types
and showed how it surpassed
them in tenderness and
juiciness plus being equal in
flavor and total palatability
. . . This is good news for the
health-conscious beef eater

man

who has little desire to
sacrifice tenderness and
flavor in getting a leaner and
healthier cut.
"Today," says Markus, "we
can find beef products in the
market place that are
represented as being lean
because the fat has been
trimmed with a knife. But
Limousin Beef is genetically
trimmed; the animal pro-
duces more meat and less
fat." . . . Recent research by
Texas Tech, Texas A & M and
Iowa State University, says
Markus, "showed that
Limousin Beef has 2 1/2 per-
cent fat in the ribeye muscle
compared to 5 percent in
other beef of the same grade,
and 9 1/2 percent in beef grad-
ed prime. There is no question
that Limousin Beef is
superior to others in lean-
ness."
According to Markus,
Limousin Beef is lower in
calories and cholesterol than
other beef due to the natural,
genetic makeup of this breed
. . . "According to the USDA"
he says, "of the top five breeds
of cattle in the U.S., Limousin
Beef has the lowest calorie
contest per ounce of lean
tissue. Plus, it has far less
calories than other types of
meat, including chicken and
fish."

Amazing facts about
Limousin Beef, according to
Markus . . . It is one of the
most nutrient-dense foods a
person can buy ... "It has
more vitamins, minerals and
protein than any other," he
says . . . It's naturally lean,
says Markus. Butchers don't
have to trim away fat which
in Limousin is from 16 per-
cent to a whopping 61 percent
(depending on the cut) less
than other grain-fed beef:
Here is an uncanny claim
. . . that Limousin Beef has
less cholesterol than chicken
. . . even roasted chicken
without the skin!
It is corn-fed . . . naturally
. . . without the use of preser-
vatives, additives, antibiotics
or growth hormones.
I Wanted To Live To Tell A
Story by Markus Rothbart
relates the dramatic, often
horrifying, but miraculous
true saga of how he survived
the Nazi Holocaust . . . If
another chapter could be
written, it might be of how
his distribution of Limousin
Beef is helping many folks on
the road back to eating meat.
CHARLES BERNSTEIN,
editor of Nation's Restaurant
News, writes in his Jan. 23,

1989 column . . . "The de-
mand for steak is in a drastic
slump, and steak houses are
going nowhere. Consumers
are opting for lighter, less ex-
pensive fare and want to stay
away from beef. Seafood and
chicken sales are soaring
while those of beef are declin-
ing. Healthful-food addicts
predominate and want no
part of beef. Nor are'
customers willing to spend
more than $25 each for din-
ner in the first place.
Anything resembling a pricey
restaurant is falling off in
volume as it meets severe con-
sumer resistance. Between
the 80-percent meal tax
deduction law and the tight
economy, customers simply
don't want to spend.
"So goes the popular
wisdom widely held
throughout the country. But
is it true?
"Anyone who walks into
any number of leading New
York steak houses during
lunch or dinner will find
almost the exact opposite
situation. The better steak
houses are thriving, whereas
other restaurants and
segments are feeling the
brunt of restaurant satura-
tion and consumer resistance.
"Perhaps this is not what it
should be, but Christ Cella,
Sparks, The Post House, Pen
& Pencil, Smith & Wollensky,
Peter Luger, The Palm, and
Gallagher's are prospering.
They are packed with
customers most of the time —
contrary to conventional
wisdom. With an average din-
ner ticket of $30 to $50, they
are doing just fine. Why is
this?

"In the customer's mind,
these places have a comfor-
table, old-time feeling easy to
identify with and relate to.
They are the antithesis of the
trendy places that supposed-
ly are dominating the scene
but come and go at breath-
taking speed.
"Most assuredly, these
steak houses are not racking
up record sales by diversify-
ing the menu with chicken
and seafood to any large
degree. They are preserving a
clear-cut identity of steak, a
principle from which they
have not veered. They are of-
fering quality prime, aged
steak — a precious commodi-
ty that enough customers
thrive on and are willing to
pay for so that they can enjoy
a happy experience without
worrying about calories or
cholesterol. What customers

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan