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February 24, 1989 - Image 70

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-02-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I ENTERTAINMENT

Restaurant
6066 W. MAPLE RD.

I I,

‘) North of Orchard lake Rd.

Music

11

L....UP 851-6577
CARRY-OUT DEPT.

Continued from preceding page

NEXT DOOR TO OUR FULL-SERVICE RESTAURANT

Featuring
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• Chicken • Sandwiches • Etc.

OUTDOOR & INDOOR CATERING FOR ALL OCCASIONS

r

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FOR 2

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BUY 1 PIZZA

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OF BREAD STICKS
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PIZZA FREE

CARRY-OUT LOCATION ONLY

• 1 Coupon Per Purchase • Expires 3.26-88 J1, 24

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For All

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ires 3-3-89
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Formerly Bread Basket II Location
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Tiffany Plaza, Bet. 14 & Middlebelt 73705190
Farmington Hills

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DINING ROOM, CARRY-OUT

Expires March 31, 1989

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Applies To Dinner of Equal or Lesser Value. Menu Items Only. I
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• Expires 3-2-89

J111

62

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1989

that music was the center of
my life, but I don't think I had
it in me.
"I was always interested in
folk music and early jazz, and
the '60s was the era of the
guitar. But I was a pianist,
and I had to figure out a way
for the piano to fit into all of
that. It was then that I
discovered that the American
piano folk tradition was
ragtime, and that certain
elements of ragtime were the
basis for many other popular
piano styles!"
A course with Rudy Blesh
— before Scott Joplin and
"The Sting" hit the charts —
introduced Rouder to a deeper
appreciation of this musical
style. She had gotten to know
a number of folk musicians in
The Village, and she decided
to leave college in the late
'60s to try her hand at perfor-
ming. "But after two years of
not becoming an overnight
superstar, I went back and
finished my degree!' Having
returned to college, I'd made
a commitment to classical
music all over again. Still un-
sure of how I wanted to use
my music, I now knew that I
did want to go to graduate
school."
Rouder spent 31/2 years do-
ing advanced work at
Brandeis towards her Ph.D.
degree. (She is one of scores of
students who have completed
all but their dissertations and
wish that some school would
offer an ABD degree.)
"My background as an
undergraduate had been in
history and theory. That was
where I was best. I was
always , fascinated by what
made music tick, what was it
that causes chills to run up
and down your spine when
you hear a passage of music
by a great composer. I chose
Brandeis because at the time
it was one of the few schools
in the country to offer a
graduate degree in theory.
What I most appreciated
about Brandeis was that it
was extremely flexible and
tailored a course of study to
my interests."
When Rouder began sear-
ching for a dissertation topic,
she returned to her early love
of jazz, which she recognized
as a serious art form — "far
more than just entertain-
ment." At that time, in the
mid-'70's, from a scholarly
standpoint, jazz was "virgin
territory."
"Very little first quality
research had gone on in the
field of jazz history," she said.
"The subject became
something of a mission with
me — to put some of this
history on the map."
A one-year grant from the
Smithsonian Institution

In her music career, Rouder has received a Grammy nomination.

allowed Rouder to "spend
many happy hours in the
music division of the Library
of Congress!'
Her year in Washington
gave her the opportunity to
draft more than two-thirds of
a work on Johnson, the New
York counter-part of Jellyroll
Morton. Johnson wrote and
recorded a lot of wonderful
jazz pieces, Rouder explains,
but he is best known as the
composer of the Charleston.
"This all comes to a happy
conclusion right here in
Michigan, where I will soon
begin working with Prof.
James Dapogny of the
Univeristy of Michigan, who
has agreed to co-author my
book."
While many musicians
hope to climax their careers
at Carnegie Hall, Rouder
began hers there, first as a
publicity assistant, later as
the director of the Hall's In-
ternational American Music
Competition, and finally as
assistant to artistic director.
"All my life the emphasis
had been on the music. Now
I had to become familiar with
the world of performers."
An artistic director, accor-
ding to Ruder, books and
engages artists and shapes
programming. Her six-year
experience at Carnegie Hall
led Rouder to the position of
orchestra manager of the Buf-
falo Philharmonic, where she
planned its 1988 season and
took charge of all orchestral
operations. "When you work
for a symphony orchestra,
you're close to the process of
putting together the product.

Buffalo was a perfect oppor-
tunity for me, big enough to
be a substantial challenge
and small enough to be a
perfect first job?'
A call from Detroit last
spring brought even more
beautiful music to Rouder's
ears. Essentially, her job is a
planner. She works very close-
ly with the music director to
plan a balanced season which
shows off the talents of the or-
chestra and the individual
performers to their best ad-
vantage and still offers the
audience as much variety as
possible.
"Our DSO is really a first
rate orchestra," says Rouder,
without a waver in her voice.
"It's an orchestra which has
had a lot of strong artistic
leadership over the years, and
its standard of playing is very
high!"
Does she predict that under
her direction there will be
many changes in the sym-
phony's programming?
"Perhaps a broader range of
music!"
She is exicted about the
DSO's upcoming move to Or-
chestra Hall next fall. "The
hall will show us off, 1,000
percent better. The hall was
originally built for this or-
chestra, and the orchestra
likes playing there."
Clearly aware of the con-
cerns facing the symphony —
"Let's face it, we all have to
worry about money" — she is
nonetheless very optistimatic
about the orchestra's new
leadership.
Who does Rouder feel are
the great classical composers



4

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