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February 24, 1989 - Image 67

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-02-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

, Hamantashen
.tta
ev"

Do you have a favorite kosher
recipe? Each month in this space,
L'Chayim will print kosher recipes
that the whole family can prepare
together. To contribute to the
column, type your recipe on 8 1 /2x11"
paper and send it to L'Chayim, clo
The Jewish News, 20300 Civic
Center Dr, Southfield 48076.

This month's recipes come from

.Congregation Beth Shalom Cooks
— the Second Time Around,

compiled by the sisterhood of
Congregation Beth Shalom.

Hamantashen

1 /2

lb. butter or margarine
1 /2 cup sugar
4 eggs
2 tsp. vanilla
2 tsp. baking powder
3 1/2 cups flour
1 can Solo poppyseed or prune
filling
1 egg
1 /2 cup sugar
3 tbsp. strawberry jam
1 cup raisins
1 cup chopped nuts

Prune Or Poppyseed, A Purim Treat

Cream butter and sugar; add
eggs, one at a time. Add vanilla,
baking powder and flour. When well
mixed, add more flour gradually
until no longer sticky. This could be
1 to 2 cups, more or less. Chill 1
hour. Roll out on floured board and
cut in rounds, using a floured
drinking glass as a pattern.
Mix poppyseed or prune filling,
egg, sugar, jam, raisins, and nuts.
Fill each round with filling and fold
up 3 sides; pinch. Bake at 350
degrees for 30 minutes or until
brown. Makes 30 to 40.

Add beaten egg and mix thoroughly
through poppyseed mixture. Add
preserves and mix well. Add almond
flavoring and nuts; mix thoroughly. If
poppyseeds are too thin, add some
bread crumbs and mix. This is not
usually necessary. Proceed with
hamantashen.

Prune Filling

1 lb. pitted prunes
Water to cover prunes

1 /2 cup plain Karo syrup
2 tsp. cinnamon

Cook prunes until very soft.
Mash prunes in mixer or blender.
Put in 2 quart casserole. Add syrup.
Cover and place in 325 degree oven
and bake 1 1/2 hours, mixing
occasionally. Mixture should be
thick and pasty. Remove from oven
and add cinnamon. Mix thoroughly.
Let cool. Proceed with hamantashen
recipe.

Poppyseed Filling

1 lb. poppyseeds
1 lb. honey
2 cups water
1 egg, beaten
1 cup peach or apricot preserves
1 tbsp. almond flavoring
1 cup ground walnuts
Soak poppyseeds in scalding
hot water overnight. In the morning,
drain off water. Grind poppyseeds.
Cook with honey and water over low
heat, stirring occasionally, until
thick. Remove from heat and cool.

Hava Nedaber Ivrit: Purim's A Big Hit For Children

Each month in this space,
L'Chayim will present a Hebrew
lesson entitled, "Hava Nedaber
Ivrit!" (Let's Speak Hebrew), whose
aim is to encourage further study of
Hebrew. The lesson will include a
brief story utilizing the Hebrew
words to be studied, a vocabulary
list with English translations and a
family activity which involves using
the new words. The lessons will be
prepared by Nira Lev, associate
profssor of Hebrew language and
— literature at the Midrasha College of
Jewish Studies. Mrs. Lev also
teaches Hebrew language and
literature at the Community Jewish
High School at the United Hebrew
Schools.
Following is this month's
lesson:
Of all the hagim in the Jewish
calendar, Purim is the one most
popular with yeladim, the one most
filled with simchah and tzahala fun
and merry-making or tze'eerirn and
mevugarim alike.
Purim, which is celebrated on
the 14th of Adar, derives its shem
from the word "pur," meaning "lot."
It recalls the lots that Haman cast to
determine the hodesh and the yom
for killing the Yehudim of Paras.
Because Purim celebrates the
mapala of Haman Ha-rasha, a

tyrant who wished laharog and
lehashmid of our people, the
Megillah tells us to keep the 14th of
Adar as a day of simchah and
tzahala. All the minhagim of this
hag are intended to enhance and
increase our hanaah and simchah.
In Yisrael, this hag is
celebrated not only ba-bayit, in
batey-hasefer and in batey-
haknesset, but also in rehovot-he-
arim. Yeladim and mevugarim alike
start planning and preparing their
tahposot, the costumes they will
wear for mesibot-purim. Yeladim
wear their costumes not only for
parties but in the streets, and they
do not wait for the day of Purim but
start strolling in the streets showing
off their costumes a few days before
Purim. Yeladim love to participate in
taharut-tahposot where a prass is
awarded to the most interesting,
original and creative tahposet.
Another minhag enjoyed by all
is mishloah-manot (often called:
shalah-monos). This means "the
sending of gifts" and it is
mentioned in Megillat-Esther. The
preparation of ozney-Haman, the
traditional Purim pastry, and the
other foods, delivering them to our
friends, parents, relatives,
adds to our simchah not less than
opening and enjoying the mishloah-

manot that we receive.

An important part of the sasson
and simchah of Purim is Seudat-
purim, when the whole mishpaha
sits down to special aruha recalling
the royal banquet at which Esther
obtained the annulment of Haman's

gzeira.

Since it is a mitzvah to be
sameah on Purim, we have to help

other people to be happy as well.
Therefore, as is typical of other
hagim yehudiyim, we have to give
tz'daka to the aniyim. It was the
minhag, as long ago as in the days
of the Mishnah, to make a special
communal appeal for the aniyim on
Purim, so that they might have a
proper Seudat Purim. Part of the
tz'daka giving is the minhag of
mahatzit hashekel — the kesef
contributed by every adult in
remembrance of biblical tax of a
half a shekel.

MeeIon (Vocabulary ►

hagim
hag
yeladim
yeled
simchah
tzahala
tze'eerim
mevugarim

holidays
holiday
children
child
happiness
joy, happiness
young people
adults

mevugar
an adult
shem
name
hodesh
month
yom
day
yehudim
Jews
yehudi
a Jew
Paras
Persia
mapala
downfall, defeat, failure
ha-rasha
the wicked
laharog
to kill
lehashmid
to destroy
minhagim
customs
minhag
a custom
pleasure, enjoyment
hana ah
ba-bayit
at home
batey-hasefer
the schools
batey-haknesset
the synagogues
rehovot-hearim
streets of the cities
costumes
tahposot
tahposet
a costume
mesibot-Purim
Purim parties
mesibat-Purim
a Purim party
taharut-tahposot a costume contest
prass
an award, a prize
mishloah-manot
sending of gifts
joy, happiness
sasson
seudat-Purim
the Purim feast
family
mishpaha
ameal
aruha
gzeira
a decree
happy
sameah
aniyim
poor people
poor
ani
half a shekel
mahatzit hashekel
money
kesef

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

L-7

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