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February 24, 1989 - Image 35

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-02-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Fourth Annual

Tzedaka Fair



throws it against the wall.
"That's my house," he
answers.
Faiq, the warehouse
manager, adds, "And lately,
it's the soldiers who are tur-
ning us back, especially on
Fridays 'til the mosques let
out."
Uprising commands are
given through the mosques,
but these workers are
registered to work in Israel. If
the goal of the country is pro-
duction, why impede them?
"It's the young soldiers," he
answers. "They're getting
power crazy and like to make
us squirm."
The Israeli military con-
siders Arab workers a danger
and, of course, they are if they
carry out terrorist operations.
But most are trying to earn a
living and are suffering bad-
ly from the uprising. Then, so
is Israel.
Dudu Topaz has another
routine concerning an Arab
worker building an airbase.
He answers the phone and
tells the caller that General
Moti is away on a top-secret
exercise. He is asked where
and answers, "Eighteen miles
southwest of Beersheva. If
you have any trouble getting
in, tell them Ahmat sent
you."
In other words, Israelis
believe reliance on Arab labor
has become a threat to their
security and don't think the
situation is all that funny.

Cost Of Living
Jumps In Israel

Tel Aviv (JTA) The cost-of-
living index soared by a hef-
ty 4.7 percent in January, one
of the highest monthly in-
creases in the past three
years. For Israeli wage
earners, devaluation means
reduced buying power,
especially for goods and ser-
vices requiring foreign cur-
rency such as imports and
travel abroad.
But it was not the only fac-
tor in the rise of the January
price index. Food prices rose
about 10 percent because
government price subsidies
were slashed for budgetary
reasons.
But the prices of fruit and
vegetables were up because of
heavy rain and wind storms
and freezing temperatures.
The February price index is
expected to increase by the
same amount because of the
spin-off effects of devaluation
and delayed rises in the cost
of electricity and public
transportation.
The inflation rate is ex-
pected to subside in the
following months and average
10 percent for the entire year.

Workers will receive a 6 per-
cent cost-of-living increment
under an agreement just
reached between the
Treasury and Histadrut.
Three percent will be paid
with February salaries due
March 1, with the rest spread
out over three 1 percent in-
crements, the last payable in
April 1990.

Sharansky
Gets Support

Jerusalem (JTA) A group of
prominent former refuseniks
has lashed out against those
who oppose the appointment
of former fellow Prisoner of
Zion Natan Sharansky as
U.N. ambassador.
The group, headed by Yosef
Begun, insisted Sharansky is
eminently suitable for the
post, in a letter published last
week in the Jerusalem Post.
The letter was also signed
by Vladimir Brodsky, Hillel
Butman, Yuli Edelstein,
Yosef Mendelevich and
Vladimir Slepak.
Responding to those who
say Sharansky's appointment
would be a needless provoca-
tion at a time when Soviet-
Israeli relations seem to be
warming, the writers stressed
that Sharansky's hostility to
the Soviet system and his con-
tinuing criticism of the USSR
is not a disadvantage for a
representative of a
democratic society."
The letter writers said they
themselves were not recom-
mending Sharansky's ap-
pointment, and "will leave
the U.N. appointments to
those responsible for making
them."
But they were obviously
angered by the storm of
criticism raised when
Sharansky was proposed for
the U.N. post.
"It seems to us that the
Soviets have reacted with less
panic than many of our fellow
Jews," the letter said.
Soviet sources have in-
dicated they have no interest
in whom Israel appoints to
head its U.N. delegation.
Sharansky's appointment is
being pushed hardest by
Deputy Foreign Minister
Binyamin Netanyahu, a
Likud hard-liner who was
Israel's ambassador to the
United Nations before he quit
last year to run for the
Knesset.
The letter writers also took
exception to how Sharansky
has been characterized by the
media.
Describing him as a "dissi-
dent and not a Jewish activist
is no less than amazing," they
wrote.

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THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

35

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