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February 10, 1989 - Image 74

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-02-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

COOKING I

When a person gets a pet, he takes on a respon-
sibility. He promises to provide food, water, shelter
and love. In return, he gets the animal's unwavering
loyalty and devotion. It's like an unwritten contract
between man and animal. Seeing this contract broken
is the saddest part of the work we do.
Sometime around the first of the year, somebody
broke his contract with Murphy. On the night of
January 3rd, one of the coldest nights of the winter, a
Michigan Humane Society (MHS) rescue driver,
responding to a call from a concerned Detroit woman.
picked up a cold, hungry and frightened 3-year-old
shepherd mix we named Murphy. Had the woman
not called — had the MHS not responded — no doubt
Murphy would have starved or frozen to death.
Helping animals like Murphy is the very heart of
the Michigan Humane Society. But for every Murphy,
there's a Ginger and a Pete and thousands of others
just like them. Victims of broken contracts and
shattered dreams. It's a challenge we face year- round.
But it's especially tough this time of year, when
a bitter winter night can get to the animals
before we can.
That's why we need your help now
\tour contribution, no matter how small, will help
us continue to get those animals on the street off the
street, the first step toward finding
them a warm and loving home.
This Valentine's Day, make
a donation to the Michigan
Humane Society. It'll warm
more than the hearts of animals
like Murphy.

.0ocee

I

Thousands of animals arc cared for lovingly each year by the Michigan
Humane Society This Valenfine's Day, won't you help us help them?

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I The Michigan Humane Society .a nonprofit organization funded by
private contributions. All contributiorns are tax deductible. 'flunk you
for caring.

Molasses Desserts
Are Sweet And Spicy

Please make checks payable to:Michigan Humane Society,
7401 Chrysler Drive, Detroit. M14821 L

L

MILS nIVI,

GLORIA KAUFER GREENE

Special to The Jewish News

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BiPTI-T DEFECTS FOuNDATiON

74

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1989

.

hen it comes to tan-
talizing your taste
buds while also set-
ting a mood of homey comfort,
nothing beats a freshly made,
molasses-and ginger dessert.
The alluring spicy aroma waf-
ting ' through the kitchen
draws you in, the old fashion-
ed appeal gets you hooked.
You simply can't resist!
Interestingly, molasses
derived from sugar cane was
one of the most popular
sweeteners in this country
until shortly after World War
I, when refined white sugar
became less expensive and
more widely available.
In the 18th and most of the
19th centuries, molasses was
actually the most common
American sweetener. Very
large quantities were im-
ported from the West Indies,
primarily to be distilled into
rum but also to be used in
cooking.
While everyone knows that
a tea tax fired up this coun-
try's revolutionaries, few
realize that a tax on molasses
imports was just as influen-
tial. Said John Adams, "I
know not why we should
blush that molasses was an
essential ingredient in
American independence."
It was also an essential in-
gredient in several favorite
colonial desserts, like those
which follow: Spices —
particularly ginger, cin-
namon, cloves, nutmeg, mace,
and pepper — were also kit-
chen staples in colonial times,
used to suppress any unplea-
sant tastes that might be pre-
sent in food. Thus, it's not sur-
prising that the combination
of molasses and spice become
so popular. The rich, earthy
flavor of molasses combined
with the sharpness of ginger
proved to be an especially
sucessful culinary marriage.
The word molasses is de-
rived from the Latin for
"honey-like" (mellaceus] . It is

essentially the syrup left over
when sugar is crystallized out
of sugar cane. when molasses
was primarily a by-product of
sugar refining, so-called
"light" molasses came from
the first extraction [and
therefore was the sweetest
and most desirable because it
contained the most dissolved
sugar and fewest impurities],
with "dark" and "blackstrap"
molasses coming from the se-
cond and third extractions.
Nowadays, premium mo-
lasses is, for the most part, no
longer a sugar by-product,
and is usually made by com-
bining first extraction syrup
with clarified cane syrup to
produce molasses with a con-
sistently high quality. When
"light" and "dark" types are
available, the former has a
milder flavor while the latter
is more robust. They can be
interchanged in most recipes,
depending _ on your taste
preference.
Molasses has been touted
for containing nutrients, in-
cluding iron, calcium and
other minerals along with
some B vitamins. However,
the amounts are so negligible
that molasses can hardly be
called "nutritious." Rather, it
is used in cooking because of
the unique flavor and aroma
it imparts to special foods
such as those below.

GINGERSNAPS

These homespun cookies —
which are sometimes known
as "Ginger Crackles" because
of their cracked surface ap-
pearance — are classics that
are easy to make and
delicious to eat. The techni-
que can be varied slightly to
make chewy or crisp cookies,
depending on your choice.

1/2 cup (1 stick] butter or
margarine
1 cup sugar [plus extra for
coating]
1/4
cup
molasses,
preferably
dark
1 large or extra-large egg

Continued on Page 76

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