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February 10, 1989 - Image 37

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-02-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The villagers follow many
occupations. Schreier is a
farmer, raising herbs. There
are also a musician, a
sculptor, an architect, a com-
puter programmer, practi-
tioners of alternative
medicine, a plant medicine
scientist, a writer, etc. Most of
the settlers raise their own
vegetables. Four of the
families are observant Jews.
This is a private village, not
a kibbutz, and each family
has its own private home, its
own domestic economy. In
most cases the land was pur-
chased from local Druze
owners. There is plenty of
land around, but most of the
settlers are not interested in
having more neighbors — not
yet. "We believe in organic
growth, slowly, to preserve

our secure, warm, congenial
community," one said.
In the meantime, the
Ministry of Energy continues
its careful study and observa-
tions of the experiment, corn-
paring results with similar ef-
forts being made in Europe.
The Israel Electric Co. set up
a pilot plant in the Negev to
produce electricity, but a
desert wind blew the whole
installation away. Paz,
Israel's largest oil company, is
engaged in a series of test in-
stallations at Sde Boker.
But the score of families at
Klil are true pioneers. Even
when things sometimes go
wrong, they have only to
recall how they did get along
during those many years
when they had no electricity
at all.

Arab Teens Say Jaffa
Should Be Palestinian

NECHEMIA MEYERS

Special to The Jewish News

affa, a former Arab
town that has been an
integral part of Tel
Aviv since the War of In-
dependence in 1948, should
be incorporated in a future
Palestinian state, say many
Arab teenagers in Jaffa.
Indeed, they might even be
considered moderates: some
of their classmates, enthused
by the PLO's declaration of
independence in Algiers, look
forward to Israel's complete
disappearance from the map
of the Middle East.
Eighth grader Salah Abu-
Hilwah is a case in point.
When interviewed recently by
a Ha'aretz correspondent, he
declared: "The Jews took
Palestine from the Arabs and
now the Arabs will simply
take it back."
One of his pals then chipped
in: "Here in Jaffa we'll be
part of a Palestinian state,
and you'll have to go live in
Gaza?'
Jaffa today is an ethnically
mixed area with an official
Arab population of 16,000,
plus an unknown number of
Arab squatters, many of them
from the "Territories."
But quite apart from its
Arab inhabitants, Jaffa still
has an "Arab look," thanks to
the presence of many pre-'48
buildings and a skyline
dominated by minarets and
church towers.
Moreover, while street
names were changed after the
War of Independence, here
and there one can still find
plaques which recall, for ex-
ample, that Etzel Street
(named after a Jewish

j

underground movement) was
once Butrous Street (named
after a prominent Arab
landowner).
It is not hard to understand
why many Jaffa Arabs, now a
minority in "their town,"
should want to transform
Etzel Street back into
Butrous Street. And their
separatist sentiments are
echoed, to one degree or
another, by residents of other

Arab population centers in
Israel. This was evident when
young people in Taibe, near
Natanya, recently protested
the demolition, by court order,
of illegally constructed
buildings in their villages:
the protestors not only stoned
policemen, but also burned
the Israeli flag and hoisted
the Palestinian flag in its
place.
On a more sophisticated
level, the increasingly in-
dependent stance of the
Council of Arab Local
Authorities, backed by Arab
Knesset members, has
created a kind of de-facto
autonomy in predominantly
Arab areas of Israel.
Such developments concern
even the most dovish
elements here, particularly
given the fact that the PLO,
despite its drive for respec-
tability, refuses to abrogate
the Palestinian Covenant
(which calls for Israel's
elimination).
The PLO also seeks to
resurrect UN Resolution 181
— the famous 1947 Partition
Plan once rejected by the
Arabs — which would "only"
take away Jaffa, Beersheba,
Ramie and half the Galilee, as
well as internationalizing
Jerusalem.

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THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

37

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