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February 03, 1989 - Image 98

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-02-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I ANN ARBOR

Bubatron

Continued from preceding page

-4

The children read the script
for ideas about the characters
and looked at book illustra-
tions. They paid special atten-
tion to the overall emotional
feel of the characters —
whether they were happy or
sad — so that they could
create the appropriate facial
expressions. Then they began
the actual construction.
"They all started with
paper plates which were cut
and molded to make them
three-dimensional," explains
Lauffer, who has taught pup-
petmaking. Paper mache and
paint were added.
The life-size heads were
then attached to a stuffed
fabric form and strings were
added.
one-of-a-kind
The se
marionettes have another in-
teresting, perhaps unique,
feature. "They're designed so
they can take the heads off
the marionettes so they can
be reworked," says Roberts.
Making the bodies and heads
detachable allows for both
flexibility and lightness.
"Marionettes are very dif-
ficult," says Roberts. Working
them, especially ones that are
measured in feet, not inches,
requires physical desterity
and strength.
Bubatron is user-friendly in

11 11114%*'

other ways. Because it uses
pre-recorded tapes it's not
necessary for the kids to learn
their lines — an inhibiting
factor which often keeps
children from the stage. And
the children manipulate the
puppets from behind the
scenes. "It's a good medium
for children who want to per-
form but who don't have stage
presence," says Lauffer. "And
it's a perfect vehicle for kids
who are shy."
During the 18th century,
marionette theater had a
remarkable reputation. In
France, puppeteers were ad-
mitted to the Royal court.
Voltaire wrote songs for the
marionette theater. In
England, Jonathan Swift and
Henry Fielding were among
its champions and in Austria
Joseph Haydn composed
music for the elaborate pup-
pet theater of Prince
Esterhazy.
Urist and Lauffer are not
expecting royal recognition,
but they both have some
wishes for Bubatron. "I would
like it to become an establish-
ed element in the Ann Arbor
Jewish Community, expan-
ding and renewing itself'
says Urist. "I think it should
be part of the Jewish cultural
scene," adds Lauffer.

-4

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Jewish Teacher
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98

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1989

AMERICAN
CANCER
f SOaETY®

An annual award has been
established to honor an
outstanding teacher in a
Jewish communal school.
Anyone can submit names
of candidates for the Schochet
Family Outstanding Teacher
Award, sponsored by the
Frank and Freda Schochet
Fund of United Jewish
Charities. Nominees must be
involved in Jewish education
in the greater Detroit area.
Up to $3,000 will be
presented to the honoree to
fund a project he or she pro-
poses in any area of Jewish
learning and teaching.
Nominees will be judged on
the potential benefits of their
proposal, as well as on his or
her individual qualities.
These include profes-
sionalism, an ability to be in-
novative, a demonstrated
commitment to Jewish educa-
tion and empathy with
students and their families.
Names of candidates should
be submitted by Feb. 28 to:
Schochet Award Committee,
do Jewish Welfare Federa-
tion, 163 Madison, Deroit, MI
48226-2180.

The award will be presented
at a public assembly in May.
Frank Schochet, who is ac-
tive in the Minneapolis
Jewish community, extended
his interest in Jewish educa-
tion to Detroit, where some of
his family reside.

Berman Award
Nominations

A Jewish communal profes-
sional employed by the
Jewish Welfare Federation or
.a Federation beneficiary will
receive the second annual
Berman Award for Outstan-
ding Professional Service,
created by Mandell and
Madeleine Berman.
The award, to be presented
in June, is intended to pro-
mote and reward extraor-
dinary professional service.
The Bermans established the
award through the Federated
Endowment Fund of United
Jewish Charities. The award
gives the recipient an oppor-
tunity to enhance his/her
leadership skills.
Nominees for the Berman

-I

4

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