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February 03, 1989 - Image 42

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-02-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SYNAGOGUE SERVICES I

NTERS
FOR ISRAEL

Can you spare 3 weeks for an adventure
you will never forget?

Spend them as a VOLUNTEER FOR ISRAEL at
an army base, hospital, kibbutz, moshav or
community service, working side by side with
Israelis, performing important tasks that will
help strengthen Israel. Knowledge of Hebrew
is not necessary. The cost:

$574 or $679

$624 or $729

(students 18 to 26)

(adults 26 to 65)

These incredible prices include:
Round-trip Flight via El Al, JFK to Tel Aviv •
Transfer to Your Lodging • All Accommodations
• All Kosher Meals: Breakfast, Lunch and
Dinner Daily • Touring, Lectures and Shabbat
Hospitality With Israeli Families

Flights leave NY's JFK Airport for Tel Aviv on:
Adult
Student
Feb. 14 Valentine's Day Singles Flight $658
March 5
$729
$679
March 12 $624
$574
March 26 $624
$574
plus $45 registration fee

YOUR AIRLINE TICKET IS GOOD FOR 180
DAYS.
Community flights -- a group of volunteers
flying to Israel from the same area -- benefit
from even lower costs.

VOLUNTEERS FOR ISRAEL

c/o J.C.C. of Metropolitan Detroit
6600 West Maple Road
West Bloomfield, MI 48033
313-661-5440
SEE

IS

SEE FOR YOURSELF

4 TRES SWEET •

Send Sweets To Your Sweetheart
This Valentine's Day
With A Specialty Gift Basket,
Or Candy And Nut Tray

Free Local Delivery • Out-Of-State Available

(313) 626-3435

[",....3]

IP

OPEN SUNDAYS SUZI &

RANDY

voikerw,4%.mtp.:::pv



,Z Pir

REFORM:

BETH EL: Services 8 p.m. today. Torah study
9:30 a.m. Saturday, services 11 a.m. Rab-
bi Daniel Polish will speak on "The Sanc-
tuaries We Build."
BETH JACOB: Services 8:30 p.m. today.
Rabbi Richard Weiss will speak on "How
the Jews Invented Hollywood."
EMANU-EL: Chavurah-family service 7:30
p.m. today. Torah study at 9:30 a.m.
Saturday, services 10:30 a.m. Young
Family Service 10:15 a.m.
TEMPLE ISRAEL: Services 8 p.m. today.
Brian Scott Tepper, bar mitzvah. Rebbe's
tish 9:30 a.m. Saturday, services 10:30
a.m. David Silverman, Bradley Shiffman,
b'nai mitzvah.
KOL AMI: Services 8 p.m. today. Rabbi Nor-
man Roman will speak on "Who is a
Jew? Part IL Questions of Divorce and
Further Marriages." Marisa Edelman
was bat mitzvah Jan. 27.
SHIR SHALOM: Services 8 p.m. today. Rab-
bi Dannel Schwartz will speak on "How
lb Give — Who to Give To." Rebbe's tish
9 a.m. Saturday, services 11 a.m.
SHIR TIKVAH: Services 7:30 p.m. today,
conducted by the sisterhood. Barbara
Heilveil, National Federation of Temple
Sisterhoods executive committee
member and district past president, will
speak.

Also: Beth Emeth (Ann Arbor).

CONSERVATIVE:
ADAT SHALOM: Services 5:30 p.m. today
and 9 a.m. Saturday. Darrin Gursky and
Eli Hyman, b'nai mitzvah. Shlome
Benezra will observe his bar mitzvah on
Sunday.
BETH ABRAHAM HILLEL MOSES: Ser-
vices 6 p.m. today and 8:45 a.m. Satur-
day. Matthew Winer, bar mitzvah.
BETH ACHIM: Services 5:30 p.m. today and
8:45 a.m. Saturday. Steven Fink will
chant the haftara.
BETH SHALOM: Services 6 p.m. today.
J.E.F.F. Shabbat dinner. Services 9 a.m.
Saturday. Storyteller Syd Lieberman will
be the guest.
B'NAI ISRAEL OF WEST BLOOM-
FIELD: Anniversary and birthday Shab-
bat. Services 9 a.m. Saturday. Rabbi

Also: Beth Isaac of Trenton, Beth Tephilath
Moses of Mount Clemens, Livonia Jewish
Congregation, and 12 Mile and Pierce (Bais
Yoseph).

TRADITIONAL:
B'NAI DAVID: Services 5:30 p.m. today and
8:30 a.m. Saturday. Niev Traison, bar
mitzvah.

RECONSTRUCTIONIST:
T'CHIYAH: Services 7:45 p.m. today con-
ducted by Lee Lipner and Janet Kelman.

SECULAR-HUMANIST:
BIRMINGHAM TEMPLE: Service 8:30
p.m. today. Yehuda Bauer, professor of
Holocaust Studies at Hebrew Universi-
ty and chairman of the International
Federation of Secular Humanistic Jews
and the International Institute for
Secular Humanistic Judaism, will speak
on "Israel and the Palestinians. The Next
Step:'

ORTHODOX:

Bais Chabad of Birmingham/Bloomfield
Hills, Bais Chabad of Farmington Hills, Bais
Chabad of West Bloomfield, Beth Jacob-
Mogain Abraham, Beth Tefilo Emanuel
Tikvah, B'nai Israel-Beth Yehudah, B'nai
Jacob, B'nai Zion, Dovid Ben Nuchim,
Mishkan Israel-Nusach H'Ari-Lubavitcher
Center, Shaarey Shomayim, Shomrey
Emunah, Young Israel of Greenfield, Young
Israel of Oak Woods and Young Israel of
Southfield.

UNAFFILIATED:
Sephardic Community of Greater Detroit.

TORAH PORTION I'

How Do We Meet The Needs
Of The 'Stranger' Of Today?

RABBI DANIEL POLISH

Special to The Jewish News

he sedrah we read
this week, Leviticus
chapters 21-24, is call-
ed Mishpatim, which literal-
ly translated means laws.
From its title, we might ex-
pect a rather dry recitation of
the rules and regulations that
would govern the Jewish peo-
ple in their desert trek. And
indeed, this section of the
Torah consists of laws and or-

Daniel Polish is senior rabbi
of Temple Beth El.

4.2 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1989

Sherman Kirshner will speak on "Big
Laws and Little Laws." David-Seth Kir-
shner will chant the haftara.
B'NAI MOSHE: Services at 5:20 p.m. today
and 8:45 a.m. Saturday. Nathan Roth
will chant the haftara.
DOWNTOWN SYNAGOGUE: Services 8
a.m. Saturday. Rabbi Noah Gamze will
speak on "Both Letter and Spirit Are
Needed."
SHAAREY ZEDEK: Services 8:45 a.m.
Saturday. Jill Bruss, bat mitzvah.

dinances, some of which
relate specifically to the
journey through the
wilderness and others which
have continued to guide
Jewish life to this very day.
Yet we find in this section
as well the remarkable in-
junction "The stranger you
shall not wrong nor opress,
for you were strangers in the
land of Egypt" (Exodus
22:20). The idea is repeated
throughout the Torah, but
this is the first time it ap-
pears. And it is repeated a lit-
tle later in the sedrah: "A
stranger you shall not op-
press, for you know the heart

of the stranger, seeing that
you were strangers in the
land of Egypt." (Exodus 23:9).
This idea, so central to the
Torah's world view, is
presented here as introduced
into Jewish life almost im-
mediately after the people
won their freedom. So soon
after being in Egypt, our peo-
ple are shown to have learn-
ed the lessons of that ex-
perience. For these words con-
tain the main ethical vision of
Jewish life. One might say
that these words constitute
the irreducible essence of the
Jewish value system. This
Jewish vision rests on an

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