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January 28, 1989 - Image 55

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-01-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Gary R. M il ler

Sheila Levine

he song "Endless Love" is
1-7
very special to newlyweds Sheila and
Barry Levine.
Sheila Goldberg, 41, now Levine,
is the manager of the family business,
Stage & Co. in West Bloomfield.
Her husband of a year and a half
is Barry Levine, 43, who owns his own
manufacturers representative agency
for heating, plumbing and kitchen
supplies.
According to Sheila, the couple
met at a social function where they
were introduced to one another by a
mutual friend.
"It was very brief:' she recalled.

"The mutual friend saw Barry and
another guy standing in the corner,

and asked me which one I wanted to
go out with."
"After dating for 25 years, it really
didn't matter to me that much," she
said.
Her friend introduced her to
Barry, and the encounter was very
casual, very short.
"We found out that we had a lot
in common."

They dated for about two years,
until Barry popped the question. She
said as the courtship progressed, she
found herself thinking more and more
about marriage.
"I was starting to feel ready, but
Barry had just gotten out of one
marriage, and I didn't want to push

him, she said. "He wanted to be
careful."
Sheila said that she was 38 when
she met Barry, but was never bothered
because she was older and not
married.
"I never worried about it," she
said.
"I had a great career, lived in a
nice apartment, and had a wonderful
group of friends, and family. It didn't
bother me that I was still single, at an
age when most people were married."
"I never thought I needed to be
married, never thought about being
married, or thought about my
wedding in my dreams," she said.
She said learning what she didn't
Continued on Page 62

THE JEWISH NEWS 55

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