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January 27, 1989 - Image 36

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-01-27

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LIFE IN ISRAEL I

DETROIT'S
HIGHEST
RATES

12 MONTH
CERTIFICATE OF DEPOSIT

9.00%

Hunger strikers protest what they see as Israel's failure to protect settlers and their vehicles.

Effective Annual Yield*

Minimum Deposit of $500

Jewish Mothers Show Courage
In Face Of Settlement Fears

NECHEMIA MEYERS

Special to The Jewish News

9.308°/o*

'Compounded Quarterly
Rates to change without notice

This is a fixed rate account that is
insured to $100,000 by the Federal
Savings and Loan Insurance Cor-
poration (FSLIC). Substantial Interest
Penalty for early withdrawal from
certificate accounts.

FIRST
SECURITY
SAVINGS
BANK FSB
PHONE 338.7700
MAIN OFFICE
1760 Telegraph Rd.
352.7700
(Just South of Orchard Lake)

L

E OUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY

36

HOURS:
MON.-THURS.
9:30-4:30
FRI.
9:30-6:00

FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 1989

MEMBER

FSLIC

Federal Savings &Loan Insurance Corp.

\bur Savings Insured to 0100,000

hatever you may
think of their polit-
ical views, one can-
not but admire the courage
and fortitude of the Jewish
women who live in Judea,
Samaria and the Gaza strip.
They face great physical
dangers day after day. Even
worse — so do their children.
Mothers who send their
boys and girls to attend school
in a nearby settlement, or to
see a doctor in Netanya, do so
with fear in their hearts. For
despite the fact that all the
buses traversing the "Tef-
ritories" have military
escorts, few escape stones
and/or Molotov cocktails.
"Israelis living elsewhere
don't realize the gravity of the
problem," says Nancy, a
Baltimore girl who resides
with her Chicago-born hus-
band and six children in
Shilo, near Jerusalem. She at-
tributes this lack of
knowledge "to biased repor-
ting by the local media, which
highlight the suffering of
Arab children but ignore that
of Jewish children!'
The trouble didn't start
with the intifada. Nancy
points out that one of her
daughters, Yisca, now 1.3, was
hit by a rock in Hebron many
years before the Arab upris-
ing began. As a result, Yisca
is loath to return to that
town. But neither she nor her
five brothers and sisters can
avoid traveling altogether.
So just as American school-
children have fire drills (or, in
California, earthquake

And when one of her six
drills), kids in Shilo have bus
kids
has-no alternative but to
drills. They learn how to
travel somewhere, she advises
hunch down on the floor if
him to take an aisle seat in
their bus is stoned, and how
the bus rather than sit next
to get out quickly if a Molotov
to a window. Also, she urges
cocktail sets it afire.
him to keep on the hood of his
To keep up their spirits in
jacket, because it serves to ab-
these besieged buses, the
sorb fragments of flying glass.
youngsters who — Nancy
Strange as it may sound,
wistfully recalls — once en-
Celia says that the intifada
joyed singing London Bridge
has a certain educational
is Falling Down, now sing
value. "It teaches the children
political pep songs instead.
about anti-Semitism and
Nava, Nancy's 12-year-old
brings home to them the
daughter, sang one of them to
meaning of a famous line in
me:
the Passover Haggada: 'In
"The Holy Land is not a ball
every generation our enemies
To throw from hand to
rise up and try to destroy us.'
hand;
While Nancy, Celia and
We must make it clear to all
their sisters are brave women,
Alone we do not stand.
even stoic courage has its
Peace we give in return for
limits. Some women (and
peace,
men) in the settlements —
Not in return for land;
angered by the Army's failure
We must make it clear to all
to stop the attacks on them
We'll never change our
and by Defense Minister Yit-
stand."
zhak Rabin's "defeatist"
The terminology used by
declaration that the intifada
the media to describe injuries
can't be halted by military
suffered by settlers is ex-
means alone — are beginning
tremely misleading, Nancy
to think of independent
declares. When her neighbor
counter measures against the
was hit in the head by a large
Arabs.
rock, the papers said she had
This is reflected in chang-
been "slightly injured?'
ing
attitudes towards the
Yet, as Nancy points out,
Jewish Underground. While
"the poor woman has been
its attacks on Arab civilians
unable to work or care for her
and institutions in 1980 were
children these last few
once decried by most settlers,
months, and I have no idea
now many of them are begin-
when she will be functioning
niing to value what the
normally again!"
Underground did, even to
Celia, a New Yorker living
argue that its activities ac-
in the Hebron area, admits
tually delayed the start of the
that the intifada has
intifada.
prompted her to cut down the
Perhaps, some settlers say,
number of trips she and her
the time has come for Jews to
children take. "No matter
stop cowering in fear of the
how brave you might be, you
Arabs, and to make Arabs
must also be responsible,"
start cowering.
Celia explains.

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