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January 27, 1989 - Image 120

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-01-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

NEWS

Egypt Halts
Talks On Taba

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120 FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 1989



ml Aviv (JTA) — Talks
aimed at wrapping up the
Taba dispute ran into a snag
last week when the Egyp-
tians suddenly refused fur-
ther discussion until Israel
submits a specific, binding
timetable for its withdrawal
from the tiny enclave on the
Gulf of Eilat.
The Egyptian foreign min-
ister said Israel must with-
draw before the talks could
continue.
Taba was awarded to Egypt
by international arbitration
last year. The bilateral talks
that began there on Thursday
were called to settle relative-
ly minor issues left unresolv-
ed by the arbitration process.
Yet to be settled is the exact
location of 185 yards of border
running from Marker 91 on a
sand hill to the edge of the
sea. Marker 91 is the last
border marker set in place
under - the arbitration
procedure.
Other outstanding matters
include access to the Avia
Sonesta Hotel and the Rafi
Nelson Vacation Village, two
resorts built by Israelis in
Taba some yearS ago. The
Israelis would like to retain
management of the two facil-
ities under Egyptian 'owner-
ship.
Israel wants its tourists to
have free access to Taba,
without passports or visas.
The Egyptians may be will-
ing to grant that right only to
day-trippers.
In addition, there are ques-
tions of policing the region,
customs inspection and cur-
rency exchange.

Bank Leumi
Branch Bombed

Jerusalem (JTA) — At least
two people were injured in
scattered incidents
in the West Bank and East
Jerusalem last week.
A Samaritan woman was
admitted to Hadassah Uni-
versity Hospital in Ein
Kerem for treatment of mod-
erate burns she received in a
firebomb attack on the Nab-
lus branch of the Bank
Leumi.
Several bank employees
were injured, none seriously.
A border policeman suf-
fered a slight neck injury in
an encounter with young
rock-throwers in Jerusalem's
Old City. The youths were dis-
persed with tear gas.
Vandals defaced a memorial
to members of a Hadassah
Hospital convoy killed in a

1948 ambush on the Mount
Scopus road.
The memorial, in the
Sheikh Jarrah neighborhood,
was quickly repaired. Major
Teddy Kollek said he hoped
this was the last of such
incidents.

I OBITUARIES 1

Betty Goldstein

Betty A. Goldstein, a
member of Jewish communal
organizations, died Jan. 21 at
age 86.
Born in Bay City, Mrs.
Goldstein lived in the Detroit
area most of her life. She was
a member of Temple Israel,
Hadassah, National Council
of Jewish Women, Sinai
Hospital Guild and Women's
American ORT.
She leaves two sons, Alan
and Samuel; a daughter, Joan
Braun; a brother, Dr. L. Hud-
son Rosenthal; a sister, Mrs.
Hiram (Bertha) Popkin; 10
grandchildren and two
great-grandchildren.

Mary Nachman

Mary Nachman, who once
was honored as the top female
furniture salesman in the
country, died Jan. 19 at age
75.
Born in Southfield, Mrs.
Nachman resided in Westlake
Village, Calif., at the time of
her death. While in Detroit,
Mrs. Nachman worked for
Robinson's Furniture and
Englander's.
In Detroit, she was a
member of Infants Service
Group. In California, she was
a gold menorah - member of
the Haverim Chapter of B'nai
B'rith and a member of Tem-
ple Etz Chaim and Temple
Adat Elohim. She held
membership in Hadassah and
Women's American ORT in
both Detroit and California.
She is survived by her hus-
band, Herman (Hy); two
daughters, Mrs. Gary (Arlene)
Monheim of Thousand Oaks,
Calif., and Lois (Lolly) Scharg
of Southfield; two sistes, Rose
Schultz of Southfield and
Gen-y Schiff of Farmington ;
and seven grandchildren. In-
terment California.

Cherrick Dies

Jerusalem — Hebrew
University of Jerusalem Vice
President Bernard Cherrick,
who had served as an official
of the unviersity for 41 yearS,
died Dec. 22 at age 74. A chair
in Jewish history at the
university bears his name.

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