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January 20, 1989 - Image 44

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-01-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

LIFE IN ISRAEL

CONTROL ELECTRONICS, INC

37450 ENTERPRISE COURT
FARMINGTON HILLS, MI
PHONE 553.3400

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1 .1

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• Choice of Monitors, Hard Drives
• 19" CAD & Desk Top Publishing Monitors
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• Accounting Software-Consulting, Setup
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386-20MHZ From $ 2,400.00
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XT-10MHZ From $ 700.00

F...
DESIGNS IN DECORATOR

LAMINATES

Martin F. Stein, national United Jewish Appeal chairman, joins Ethiopian students at the Hofim Youth Center for
the blessing after meals.

For High Quality Formica
Always At A Great Discount

Mental Anguish Is Continuing
For Rescued Ethiopians Jews

SPECIALIZING IN
• Bars • Wall Units
• Bedroom
Groupings
• Dining Rooms
• Credenzas

EDWARD SEROTTA

Special to The Jewish News

T

ALSO SPECIALIZING

• Woods • Glass
• Marbles • Lucites

IT DOESN'T HAVE TO COST A
FORTUNE . . . ONLY LOOK LIKE IT!

LCALL LOIS HARON 851-6989

NEED PHYSICAL THERAPY?

DO YOU KNOW THAT
YOU HAVE A CHOICE?

If you are referred for physical therapy,
you may receive this service at the
location of your choice.
A private practice physical therapist
can offer you —
• Prompt service — no waiting list
• Individualized programs
• Extended office hours
• Reasonable charges
For more information call 474-5516

23800 Orchard Lk. Rd. '-
Suite 101
F
Farmington Hills, MI
Physical Therapy
48024.3488

armingt

44

FRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 1989

P.C.

all, lanky and black,
Uri Abraham, an
Ethiopian Jew now liv-
ing in Israel, remembers well
his arrival in the Holy Land.
"The first thing I saw was
a man in uniform, just like
the soldiers who shot Jews
dead back in Ethiopia. Then
someone took me by the arm,
and said, `Uri, I want to show
you something you've never
seen before: a Jewish soldier.'
And the soldier smiled, shook
my hand and said, 'Welcome
to Israel, welcome home. "
The Jews of Ethiopia,
persecuted by Marxists, their
farms ruined by famine,
began their quiet and
treacherous exodus in 1980.
After 8,000 had reached safe-
ty in Israel in 1984, the
Israeli government launched
the top secret Operation
Moses. Between November
1984 and March 1985, 7,000
were airlifted from the Sudan
to Israel.
But when the story broke in
the press, an angry Sudanese
government halted the
rescue. It has not yet been
allowed to resume. Approx-
imately 10,000 Jews remain
in Ethiopia.
Of the 15,200 Ethiopian
Jews in Israel, almost all have
family still at home. The men-
tal anguish is great, but
Operation Moses is a story of
remarkable progress.
"The first thing we learn-

ed," said Morton Dolinsky of
the Jewish Agency's Im-
migration and Absorption
Department, "is whatever
you thought you could take
for granted, you couldn't.
These are people who had
never seen a door, a faucet.
You see, when you tell so-
meone class begins at 8:00,
you have to tell them how to
use a clock. But are they ever
fast learners . ."
Although the majority of
Ethiopian men had never
even seen a metal tool before,
the Amishav Agency set up
technical schools to teach
plumbing, woodworking, and
machine work, placing 2,000
men in factory jobs, and
scores of women in nursing.
Young men are now serving
in the Israeli Army. Many
have already been absorbed

into the general society.
Hofim, an educational
center for Ethiopian children,
funded largely by the
UJA/Federation Campaign,
was established with
everything from kinder-
gartens to computers.
Rabbi Nachum Cohen, its
director, says, "We have 94
boys in their eary 20s. Our
goal is simple — to provide
2,000 years of technical train-
ing and make them job-
marketable in 24 months.
"And they work harder
than anyone I've ever seen.
They know what they've left
behind.
"And we know Operation
Moses is, for us, ongoing.
They have great pride, these
Ethiopians, but there will be
pain for years to come."
UJA Press Service

Boom Will Continue
In Posthumous Aliya

NECHEMIA MEYERS

Special to The Jewish News

W

hile ordinary aliya
from the United
States remains in
the doldrums, posthumous
aliya is on the upswing.
Over 1,000 Americans have
been buried in the Eretz
Hahayim (Land of Life)
cemetery, which was special-
ly created for them several
years ago at Beit Shemesh,

some 12 miles southeast of
Jerusalem.
Another 10,000 Eretz
Hahayim burial plots have
already been sold to in-
dividuals as well as to
organizations (like American
Agudat Israel and the
Yeshiva University Alumni
Association). So it is
reasonable to assume that
posthumous aliya will con-
tinue to boom.
Burial in the Holy Land,
and particularly in the

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