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January 20, 1989 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-01-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

LOCAL NEWS

YOU'RE COVERED
With Our T-Shirt!

UJC Grants

Continued from Page 1

program that combines the
use of video and discussion
between parents and teens
around traditional Jewish
morals and values.
United Jewish Charities
also approved $15,000 for the
first year of scholarship
grants to encourage study in
Israel and/or participation in
Israel-based programs. The
Community Israel Scholar-
ship Fund was one of the pro-
posals of Federation's Com-
mission on Identity and
Affiliation.
In other action, UJC
allocated:
$43,050 to Wayne State
University's Center for

- Judaic Studies.
$24,000 to subsidize a com-
munity solidarity trip to
Israelin March under the
sponsorship of the Jewish
Community Council.
$20,000 for grounds
maintenance at the
Maple/Drake Jewish Com-
munity Campus.
$10,000 to the Jewish Na-
tional Fund for fire engines to
help Israel meet its forest fire
emergency.
The UJC's Federated En-
dowment Fund has reached
nearly $80 million toward a
$100 million goal. The fund
distributed $5,926,763 to
charitable agencies last year.

UP FRONT

I

Ann Arbor

Continued from Page 5

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12

STATE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 1989

amount the JCC and other
local agencies receive. "I real-
ly also believe that more
(money) will be contributed
because people have an oppor-
tunity to do for their local
community," she adds.
"It's a good thing," says
Charles Newman, a major
donor to the UJA and a JCC
board member. "Now we have
an umbrella which ac-
comodates everyone's in-
terests."
Jewish Cultural Society
director Judith Seid thinks
the change is a good one but
wonders if it isn't merely
cosmetic. "I think it's a step
forward in community con-
trol. But I think it will not
result in any net difference in
allocations."
Officials close to the
UJA/JCA do not expect the
present allocation break-
down to change dramatically.
It is expected that, even with
the new formula, approx-
imately 70 percent of the
monies will go overseas and
30 percent will remain in
Washtenaw County. UJA/JCA
by-laws require a majority of
monies collected to go to
Israel.
Support of the policy
change is not unanimous,
even by those who could
benefit from it. "In principle
I'm troubled by the idea," says
Michael Brooks, B'nai B'rith
Hillel director at the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Hillel
receives some funds from the
UJA/JCA. "I consider con-
tributions to the UJA as
Jewish taxation. People who
are concerned about where
their taxes are going should
get involved with the process
of making a determination
about those decisions."
Brooks fears that the new
policy is a short-term solution

to a larger issue which
demands a more substantial
response.
The new earmarking policy
is one of a number of changes
that will be instituted with
the 1989 campaign. "Every
Jew deserves to have a con-
versation about his gift with
another Jew," says Earl Jor-
dan, UJA director. Jordan,
among other things, wants to
personalize the process. Jor-
dan hopes that this year's
Ann Arbor campaign will
follow the national lead,
which is up 13 percent.
Whether or not that's possi-
ble is the big question. There
have been indications that
Ann Arbor's support of the
UJA/JCA is less than cities of
similar size.
According to a 1987
UJA/JCA survey of the
Jewish community, 23 per-
cent of the respondents
reported combined household
incomes over $90,000; 34 per-
cent reported incomes bet-
ween $50,000 and $90,000.
This year the average
pledge to the UJA/JCA was
$503, which was less than the
previous two years. For the
last three years the UJA cam-
paign has been declining:
$390,835 was raised in 1988,
compared to $428,057 in 1987
and $430,255 in 1986.

The amount of money given
to the Israel Emergency Fund
dropped by 64 percent, as
compared to 1987, and dona-
tions to Project Renewal,
which go to the town of Yosef-
thal, increased by 28 percent.
Those figures could be read
as insignificant statistical
blips. Or they could be seen as
reflections of concern by some
Ann Arborites who want to
give, but only wish to give in
certain ways.

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