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January 13, 1989 - Image 58

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-01-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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CANCER
SOCIETY '

Foreign Policy Team
Fits Into Bush's Mold

WOLF BLITZER

Special to The Jewish News

W

ashington — Presi-
dent-elect George
Bush, widely con-
sidered a relatively moderate
and pragmatic Republican, is
making certain that the top
level of his foreign and
defense policy team fits nice-
ly into his mold.
Don't expect any major
changes in the global or
regional strategy of the
United States in the coming
months and years. For beyond
this deeply ingrained
pragmatism, there also will
be strong continuity in policy
from the Reagan years.
As far as the Middle East is
concerned, 1989 could be a
tough year in American-
Israeli relations. But that will
depend not only on the Bush
administration, but on the ac-
tions of Israel, the Arab states
and the Palestinians.
Israel, by projecting a
moderate and constructive
tone in the peace process,
could cushion any serious
damage to its relationship
with the United States. But
an Israel that constantly says
no to fresh peace proposals
could undermine its Washing-
ton connection.
Bush and his advisers, of
course, will develop their own
styles. There are clear dif-
ferences between Bush and
President Ronald Reagan.
Bush will come into the
White House with a great
deal of personal foreign policy
experience, something
Reagan lacked.
In addition to his eight
years as Vice President, Bush
served earlier as United Na-
tions Ambassador, Central In-
telligence Agency Director
and Ambassador to China.
During the Reagan adminis-
tration, he headed a task
force on combatting ter-
rorism, and he now considers
himself an expert of sorts in
that area.
Reagan, by contrast, came
to Washington as a former
California governor.
Bush is very knowledgeable
about international affairs,
including the Middle East.
He knows the issues and the
players. He may not be as ef-
fective a communicator as
Reagan, but he is very much
on top of the subject. While
Reagan seemed to prefer to
deal with domestic economic
issues, Bush clearly prefers
foreign affairs.
The President-elect is ag-
gressively selecting talented

Quayle: Israel is a friend.

and experienced people to
serve in his Cabinet, almost
all of them savvy in the ways
of Washington. No newcomers
need apply for key positions.
The controversial naming of
Indiana Sen. Dan Quayle as
his vice presidential running-
mate has so far been the only
major surprise in Bush's ap-
pointments. It has been the
exception to the rule. Quayle
is clearly more conservative
than Bush and most of his
other appointees. Why Bush
picked Quayle still remains a
mystery.
4
Quayle's record in the
Senate, while by no means
perfect as far as Israel was
concerned, was still pretty
good. In the East-West strug-
gle, according to the 41-year-
old vice president-elect, Israel
is part of the -Western camp.
It is an anti-Soviet, demo-
I
cratic ally that deserves con-
tinued U.S. support.
How much influence
Quayle will be remains to be
seen. Most insiders believe it
will be marginal.
Other appointments have
been much more predictable,
acceptable and mainstream.
Bush's appointed Secretary
of State, James Baker, is a
politician first, and a
statesman second. Like Bush,
Baker is a conservative — but
no fanatic. He is sensitive to
the concerns of Congress,
especially to the Democratic
majorities in both the Senate
and House of Representa-
tives. He will try to avoid too
much friction with them.
During the first four years
of President Ronald Reagan's
administration, Baker. served
as the White House Chief of
Staff. For most of the second .14
four years, he was Secretary
of the Treasury.
At the State Department,
Baker can be expected to con-
tinue the general thrust of
the Reagan policies toward

FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 1989

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