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January 13, 1989 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-01-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

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HIGHEST
RATES

12 MONTH
CERTIFICATE OF DEPOSIT

9.00%

Effective Annual Yield*

Minimum Deposit of $500

9.308%*

*Compounded Quarterly
Rates to change without notice

This is a fixed rate account that is
insured to $100,000 by the Federal
Savings and Loan Insurance Cor-
poration (FSLIC). Substantial Interest
Penalty for early withdrawal from
certificate accounts.

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(Just South of Orchard Lake)

E OUAl HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

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PHONE 338•7700
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9:30-4:30
FRI.
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FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 1989

MEMBER

FSLIC

Federal Savings & Loan Insurance Corp.

Your Savings Insured to 1100.000

FRONTLI NES

JCCouncil Urges Detroiters
To See Israel In The Spring

RICHARD PEARL

Staff Writer

S

how solidarity with
Israel by celebrating
springtime there, says
the Detroit Jewish Communi-
ty Council.
That idea underlies the
special March 2-10 Detroit
Jewish Community Solidari-
ty Trip the Council is pro-
moting to its nearly 300 con-
stituent organizations as well
as to the general Jewish com-
munity, says David Gad-Harf,
Council executive director.
"We hear feedback from
people living in Israel," said
Gad-Harf. "Some are disap-
pointed by the sharp reduc-
tion in American tourism
there.
"We've heard that the
hotels are nearly empty, and
that's both a financial as well
as an emotional strain on
Israelis because tourism is
the No. 2 industry in the
state," he said.
"We want to reassure them
that there is no slackening of
support for Israel, and this
trip is designed to assure
them of the maintenance of
that support."
The special trip — priced at
$999 per person, double oc-
cupancy, including round-trip
airfare from Detroit, five-star
hotel accomodations and most
meals — has already received
about two dozen firm com-
mitments, with another 50-60
Detroiters "seriously think-
ing about it," said Gad-Harf
on Monday.
"But that number may be
low even now, because in the
last few days, our phones have
been ringing." The registra-
tion deadline is Jan. 23.
Space is limited to 200, with
the Council aiming for a
minimum of 100 tourists.
The Council has scheduled
an informational meeting 7
p.m. Tuesday at United
Hebrew Schools. Speakers
will include Council member
Kathleen Straus of the
American Jewish Committee-
Detroit Chapter, who recent-
ly returned from an Israel
trip.
If 200 go, the delegation
will make history as one of
the largest ever from Detroit.
"There is no more beautiful
place in the world to celebrate
the arrival of spring than
Israel," said Paul D. Borman,
Council president, who will
lead the tour with Gad-Harf.
Another Detroiter, David
Hermelin, will be joining the
trip as chairman of the

Springtime in the Galilee.

tourism arm of Operation In-
dependence, an American
group trying to boost Israel's
economy by encouraging U.S.
investments in Israel,
tourism and imports from the
Jewish state.
Tour highlights include
Jerusalem — Yad VaShem
Holocaust Memorial, the
Western Wall and the
Knesset; the Galilee, Golan
Heights and kibbutzim; and
Tel Aviv, Caesarea and
Dizengoff Street nightlife.

The trip will offer kosher
food and non-stop flights bet-
ween New York and Israel via
El Al Israel Airlines.
Gad-Harf said the Council
isn't competing with other
Jewish organizations offering
Israel tours, just supplemen-
ting them.

"We encourage them (peo-
ple who ask which tour to
take) to go with their own
group;' he said. "The point is
to get people to go to Israel."

Israel's PLO Response
Frustrates Its Friends

DAVID HOLZEL

Israel Correspondent

A

t a recent teleconfer-
ence with the Israel
Government Press Of-
fice, the Jewish community
leadership of Baton Rouge,
La., had two principal ques-
tions, according to Yoram Et-
tinger, the GPO's director.
"They wanted to know why
Israel doesn't test the PLO to
see if its intentions are
peaceful. They also asked how
we know if the PLO is a ter-
rorist organization," he said.
Not very comforting, corn-
ing from Israel's best friends,
but then a lot of questions
have been asked in response
to the Palestine Liberation
Organization's diplomatic in-
itiative of the last few weeks
— including Yassir Arafat's
appearance before the United
Nations in Geneva, America's
opening of a dialogue with
the PLO, Arafat's promise to
find the perpetrators of the
bombing on Pan Am Flight
103, and his appearance on
the cover of Time magazine.

The main question put to
Israel is, What_are you going
to do about it all?
The Israeli response so far
-- a promise of a new peace in-
itiative of its own at an
unspecified later date — has
left Israel's American Jewish
friends "in a high level of
frustration," in the opinion of
Harry Wall, the Anti-Defama-
tion League's Jerusalem
director. "They wish Israel
would get its act together."
Wall, Ettinger and others
involved in Israel's Hasbarah,
or propaganda information,
urge caution and patience
with Israel as its new govern-
ment decides what steps to
take next.
Wall said Israel's ap-
pearance of diplomatic stasis
may not be a bad thing if
movement means backing in-
to a precarious position.
Ya'akov Levy, director of the
Israel Foreign Ministry's in-
formation division, pointed
out that the PLO has let out
some of the steam from its
diplomatic juggernaut in re-
cent days.
Most damaging, he said,

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