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December 30, 1988 - Image 64

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-12-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

mmemmemom ■ •••

iGIU1111)

Maven

dining room, carry-out and trays

ggzEn

(1 3ftS

-

p

open tuesdays thru sundays
10 a.m. to 11 p.m.

968-0022

lincoln shopping center, 10 1/2 mile & greenfield, oak park

-11.
COMO TAO

Charles Liu's







Mandarin, Szechuan, Hunan Cuisine
100% soybean oil used. No MSG upon request.
Senior Citizen menu between 2 p.m.-6 p.m. Mon.-Sat.
Dine in and carry-out service
Excellent reviews by major newspapers
Ching Tao is "leader emphasizing a healthful approach."
Molly Abraham — Detroit Free Press

29295 SOUTHFIELD RD. NORTH OF 12
IN SOUTHFIELD COMMONS (Former Farrell's)
557-0410

41871 GARFIELD RD. AT 18 MILE
IN IMPERIAL PLAZA, CLINTON TWP.
263-0050

Deli Unique

967-3999

25290 GREENFIELD North of 10 Mile Rd.

CATERING FOR ALL OCCASIONS

GOLDEN BOWL

Restaurant

22106 COOLIDGE AT 9 MILE In A & P Shopping Center
398-5502 or 398-5503
DINE IN & CARRY-OUT

SZECHUAN, MANDARIN, CANTONESE & AMERICAN CUISINE



OPEN 1 DAYS-Mon.-Thurs. 11-10, Fri. & Sat. 11-11, Sun. & Holidays 1 p.m. to 10 p.m.

• Banquet Facilities

It a

r

[El

COMPLETE
CARRY-OUT
AVAILABLE

plt

Your Chef: FRANK ENG

THE GOLD COIN

OPEN 7 DAYS — YOUR HOST: HOWARD LEW
SZECHUAN, MANDARIN, CANTONESE

NEW A LA CARTE DINNERS UNDER $5

24480 W. 10 MILE

West of Telegraph

(IN TEL-EX PLAZA)
353-7848

■ 1111111•111111111=1111.

TIDE GPEAT WALE

SERVING YOUR FAVORITE EXOTIC
DRINKS & CHOICE COCKTAILS

PRIVATE DINING ROOM

• BANQUETS • PARTIES • BUSINESS MEETINGS I

Your host . . . HENRY LUM

Businessmen's Luncheons • Carry outs • Catering

35135 Grand River, Farmington
(Drakeshire Shopping Center)

476-9181

KABOB GRILL

Authentic Lebanese and American Cuisine

I CARRY-OUT & CATERING AVAILABLE

29702 SOUTHFIELD AT 12 1/2 MILE (In Southfield Plaza)

557-5990

MON.-FRI. 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. SAT. 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.
SUNDAY 1 p.m. to 8 p.m.

HOA KOW INN

Specializing In Cantonese, Szechuan & Mandarin Foods

Open Daily 11 to 10:30, Sat. 11 to 12 Mid., Sun. 12 to 10:30


13715 W. 9 MILE, W. of Coolidge • Oak Park

— Carry-Out Service

........

44

Continued from preceding page

• breakfast • lunch • dinner
• after-theater • kiddie menu

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 1988

547-4663

Band. "I was tired a lot," Lieb-
man said.
Graduating from WSU with
a Bachelor of Music degree,
Liebman left his job at WWJ
to go into business with his
father at the broadcasting
school, where he started a
video production company. He
taped weddings and b'nai
mitzvah and, "started getting
guys to rent the studio. I did
some cable TV programming
. . . anything that had to do
with videotaping.
"It was growing but I just
decided it wasn't what I
wanted to do," he said. "I
think I was too wrapped up in
the trappings of business .. .
I just wanted to get back into
my blue jeans and play some
jazz."
Instead, Liebman returned
to school and chose the pro-
gram at University of Miami
in Coral Gables, Fla., where
he would spend the next 21/2
years pursuing his Master of
Music degree. He began work-
ing three days after he moved
in. During his first semester,
Liebman met Sammi Siegel, a
bass clarinet player and music
therapist, on the steps of a
concert hall where both were
performing. After a courtship
of a few years, they married.
They have a son, Joshua
Michael.
His in-laws were eager for
Liebman to join their
business, but it wasn't his area
of interest. "Here I was, eight
hours a day on the floor of a
retail store, selling sleeping
bags, tents and hiking boots,"
Liebman said. "It just wasn't
for ma"
The same day he left thd
business he got an invitation
to play in South America and
the promise of work in New
York and Los Angeles. "That's
when I got started playing all
the Latin music," he recalled.
Liebman has amassed many
professional credits. He per-
formed with Fran Warren,
toured the Caribbean on a
cruise ship with jazz
clarinetist Buddy De Franko,
worked with comedian Jackie
Mason and his all-star line-up
on Miami Beach, accompanied
Jerry Vale, Eddie Fisher, Ear-
tha Kitt, Donald O'Connor,
George Kirby, Jim Bailey, Pat-
ty Andrews and the Ink Spots.
He also performed at
Madison Square Garden with
Libertad Lararque, an Argen-
tinian tango singer, and again
with Braulio at Universal
Studios in Los Angeles and on
tours in South America and
the Dominican Republic. He
p:ayed additional stints at
Madison Square Garden with
Miguel Gallardo, an RCA
recording artist from Spain.
Last year, he performed at
the Miss Honduras Pageant,

Former Detroiter Liebman has performed with a variety of musical stars.

again with Braulio. He played
at a 100th birthday party for
Broadway producer George
Abbot, along with theater
notables Dina Merril, Jose
Ferrer, Hal Prince and Kitty
Carlisle.
Liebman's musical arrange-
ment for "Miami Vice's"
Saundra Santiago was per-
formed on "The Late Show
with Joan Rivers." He arrang-
ed music for Doc Severinson
and the Ibnight Show Band
and actress/vocalist Roz Ryan.
When he's not on the road,
he keeps busy around Miami
playing club dates, big shows
and condo shows. "Some-
times," Liebman said, "I can
play a club date or a show in
the evening and then rush
downtown or to Little Havana
to do a Latin show, which
won't start until 1 or 1:30 a.m.
Sometimes I'm able to do as
many as eight or nine gigs a
week that way." "Getting
work is oftan a matter of who
you know," Liebman insists.
"If someone's producing a
record or putting together a
job, he's going to call his guys.
Fortunately, I have such con-
nections."
Liebman aspires to be a
well-rounded studio musician.
In Miami, his studio work has
included demos, concerts and
some radio and TV 'Ib main-
tain the competitive edge, he
has put together a studio in
his house and is working to
master the entire electronic
aspect of music. Since he also
composes music, he is putting
his original pieces into the
computer, utilizing the elec-
tronic gadgetry, mixing dif-
ferent sounds, adding the
drum machine — and even
printing lead sheets and
scores on his printer.
The Liebmans are members
of Ibmple Samu-El-Or-Olom
and, as much as possible at
holiday time, they travel to
Southfield to join relatives.
In their spare time, they at-

tend concerts, wander around
Coconut Grove and enjoy Josh.
Liebman works out and runs
and recently participated in
the Orange Bowl 10,000
Meter Race as well as the
Purim Run at the Mimai
Jewish Center.
Looking ahead to the winter
season, Liebman is already
booked for a five-week engage-
ment, playing in the pit or-
chestra for the classical Broad-
way show, Into The Woods. He
just turned down an offer of a
booking on a four-month
cruise to Australia, Tahiti and
Hawaii.
Liebman recently attended
a jazz convention in Los
Angeles and is excited about
the many contacts he made.
"I've got to get out there. We
are definitely planning on
relocating to California."
Liebman is grateful for the
success he has gained in his
music career. He attributes it
to having the right stuff. "I
think the real answer to how
one is succeeding in this
business depends on whether
or not you get called back .. .
and I've been called back by
just about everybody." 0

Poet Heifetz
Reads At U-M

Hill Street Forum's
Celebration of Jewish Arts
Series of the University of
Michigan B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundation will feature poet
Julie Heifetz at 8 p.m. Jan.
21, in Green Auditorium at
Hillel, 1429 Hill St., Ann Ar-
bor. Tickets are available at
the U-M Hillel Foundation.
Heifetz — poet, psycho-
therapist, educator — will
present her poetry, including
some based on oral histories
by Holocaust survivors and
liberators, as well as other of
her works. She will be accom-
panied on piano and guitar by
Jim Klueh.

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