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December 30, 1988 - Image 52

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-12-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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FEELING GOOD

Life Cycling

Continued from preceding page

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THE FRANKLIN JUNIOR TENNIS PROGRAM

All Ages / All Levels I Non-Members Welcome

WINTER CLASSES
BEGIN Jan. 6

• Ages 3-18
• Limited Space
• Beginners To
National Level
Players

Call the Junior Tennis Dept.
for information and sign-up

352-8000 EXT. 38

FRANKLIN
Fitness & Racquet Club

29350 Northwestern Hwy./Southfield, MI

10 CLASSES
FOR $ 1 0*

1 ,0, 1)1



Specializing in

low impact, aerobics,
stretch & contour, fatburner,
beginner & advanced

* New Client Only
* Expires 6 Weeks From
Date of Purchase
*Coupon good thru 1/31/89

LANGUAGE

FITNESS, SYSTEMS

6235 Orchard Lake. Rd.
Sugartree
West Bloomfield

737-6881

RING IN THE NEW YEAR BY WEEDING OUT
YOUR OLD CLOTHES!

CLOTHES OUT is a service that has been designed to help
you to clean-out and re-organize your closets.
15% OFF1
WE WILL: 1. Go through your closet with you;
YOUR TOTAL!
, :
2.Weed out your dated items;
CHARGE !
3. Reorganize the clothing you choose to keep;

4, Rehang your unneeded items for resale.

CALL US TODAY! (313) 352-5454

By
Appointment
Only

10 F

-

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 1988

JENNIFER BINDES
AMY LOEWENSTEIN

Now Thru 2/28/89

c[lcOno Out

28611 Franklin River Dr.
Southfield, MI 48034

I

fitness classes at the JCC and
the Farmington YMCA for
eight years. Stevens cycles in
the fall, spring and summer.
In the fall and spring, she
really enjoys riding around
Kensington Metro Park. In
the summer, she cycles up
north near Camp Walden on
the country roads.
"I have always been a
fitness buff. I have always en-
joyed the outdoors, and fitness
has always been important to
me," says Stevens.
Stevens believes fitness has
surged in popularity because
it is a non-impact activity.
"People find impact activities,
such as running or aerobics,
hard on their muscles and
joints," she says. She also
mentions that cyclists should
always remember how impor-
tant it is to thoroughly
stretch their leg muscles just
like runners.
In addition to the Ken-
sington Metro Park path,
there is also the path along
1-275 from 10 Mile Rd. to
Ohio.
There are two kinds of
organized cycling—touring
and racing.
Racing has become more
popular over the past several
years, thanks probably to the
televising of such events-as
the Tour de France and the
competitions in the Summer
Olympics. Not one to miss a
trend, New York real estate
magnate Donald Trump has
jumped on the biking band-
wagon with his proposed
"Thur de Trump," a seven-
stage race beginning in
Manhattan and ending in
Atlantic City, N.J., next May.
While racing is a good spec-
tator sport, it's usually tour-
ing that people turn to when
starting out in biking. Racing
is usually for those under 30.
"The age group that races is
usually in their mid-20's
because there is a lot of
traveling and it can be very
expensive," says Bryan.
Bryan observes the
popularity of cycling as a
family sport.
For an increasing number
of people, cycling is not only
a sport—it's their means of
transportation. According to
the Bicycle Federation of
America, more than two
million people now bike to
work, up from 500,000 a
decade ago.
The two basic choices in
bicycles are the 10-speed
upright or the all-terrain
bike, the newest development
in mass market bicycles. The
all-terrain bike has wider
tires, a wider saddle, and
upright bars so that you can
ride with a straight back in-
stead of hunched over.
According to Bryan, a good

basic bike costs between $300
and $400. "Thday the weight-
factor has to do with the price
of the bike. The lighter the
bike, the more expensive it is
and the better equipped it is,"
he says. He mentions the
Raleigh Thchnums as top-of-
the-line bikes with aluminum
frames. Unlike most bikes to-
day, the Raleigh Thchnums
are made in the U.S. in
Seattle.
One new advance in
bicycles is indexed shifting, in
which you pull on the handle-
bars until you hear a click
into the next gear. Cyclists
don't have to take their hands
off the handlebars anymore.
While accessories that go
with bicycles are new and
varied — from cycling shoes to
shorts with pads for extra
comfort, from water bottles to
repair tools — the one essen-
tial on which everyone agrees
is a helmet.
"That should be your first
accessory," says Schemanske.
All cyclists agree that
helmets offer some protection
against head injuries.
When selecting a helmet,
look for a sticker indicating
that the helmet meets or ex-
ceeds the standards set by
either the Snell Memorial
Foundation or the American
National Standards Institute
(ANSI). Helmets range in
price from $20 to $70.

Helpful Places

For more information on
cycling in general or on
specific areas of interest to
you, contact the following
organizations:

Bicycle Federation of America
1818 R Street
Washington, D.C. 20009
202-332-6986
Clearinghouse for informa-
tion on all cycling subjects;
publishes monthly
newsletter.

Bicycle Manufacturers
Association
1055 Thomas Jefferson St.
NW
Washington, D.C. 20007
Trade association.

Euro-Bike Thurs
P.O. Box 40
DeKalb, IL 60015
815-758-8851
Arranges tours abroad.

International Bicycle
Thuring Society
2115 Paseo Dorado
LaJolla, CA 92037
619-459-8775
Information on bike tours
for adults.

International Bicycle Thurs
12 Mid Place

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