100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

December 30, 1988 - Image 48

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-12-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FLYING SOUTH FOR THE WINTER?

FEELING GOOD

Germ Wars

Continued from preceding page

DON'T LEAVE HOME WITHOUT THEM!

Complete your travel wardrobe
with the latest in prescription
or non-prescription eyewear.

At

steven franklin optics

ON THE BOARDWALK.
6891 ORCHARD LAKE ROAD
SOUTH OF MAPLE
855.5810

20-30% OFF SELECTED STYLES

"You'll like our service ..
you'll love our people."

Adeline A. Laforet, RN

President

Home/Hospital/Nursing Home
Nursing Care/Personal Care/Homemaking
Rent-a-Mom

536.0056

ALWAYS OPEN
357-7080

656-7076

Dearborn
Southfield
Rochester
Medicare/Blue Cross/Private Insurance

Health Care

PROFESSIONALS LTD.

• Botulism — widely found
in the environment, it only
produces toxin in a low-acid,
oxygenless environment such
as in canned vegetables. Bo-
tulism affects the respiratory
tract, causing progressive
paralysis with symptoms of
double vision, inability to
swallow and speech difficulty.
Medical attention is neces-
sary since botulism can be
fatal.
Other bacteria and or-
ganisms, including hepatitis
virus, mycotoxicosis molds,
and the giardiasis and ame-
biasis protozoa, also cause
distress.
Because many of the bac-
teria that can cause con-
tamination exist naturally in
the digestive tracts of ani-
mals, meat, dairy and poultry
processing operations have a
greater potential for problems
than a bakery operation, for
example. Some of the major
documented outbreaks of food
poisoning have been traced to
the pasteurization process.
At the Hillfarm Dairy in
Chicago, 16,284 confirmed
cases of salmonellosis and at
least two deaths resulted
from the consumption of con-
taminated low-fat milk. As
many as 200,000 people may
have been stricken during the
outbreak a few years ago. In
1985, listeriosis, another food-
borne bacteria that flourishes
in milk, caused more than
100 deaths in California
among people who ate an
unpasteurized cheese.
More recently, the National
Academy of Sciences released,
a study indicating that gov-
ernment inspection proce-
dures fail to identify salmo-
nella and other
microorganisms in more than
one-third of all chickens sold
in stores.

Packaging

OSE WEIGHT FAST!
10 - 20 Lbs. First Week

gssellTruse--

A European Style Health Resort in Historic OW Key West

Holistic Meals & Juice Fasting.
Complete Spa Facilities.
Body Wraps • Massage • Facials

RUSSELL HOUSE

611 Truman Ave.
Key West, FL 33040
(305) 294-8787
FREE BROCHURE

6-F

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 1988

Fluid packed with the
chicken may be the worst
source of contamination. It is
likely to contain the bacteria
and comes in contact with
knives, cutting boards, coun-
ters and hands during food
preparation. The study called
on the Department of Agri-
culture to abandon its visual
inspection checks and adopt a
rigorous random bacterial
testing of poultry.
The FDA, according to
Miller, who is the agency's top
food safety official, is reex-
amining its approach to
microbiological, standards
and inspection.
"We
can't separate
microbiological issues from
the toxicological issues, from
the nutritional issues, from
the chemical issues," he said.
"It isn't a question of how you
can protect people from

what's in the food supply, but
rather one of how you can
improve their health and
quality of life by changing the
food supply."

Home Cooks

By and large, though, the
biggest threats to the whole-
someness of food are the cook-
ing habits of home cooks.
In the way they shop, cook,
serve and store food, many
home cooks are inviting
disaster. Dangerous micro-
organisms multiply and
thrive at temperatures
between 40 and 120 degrees.
Though freezing prohibits the
growth of bacteria, it does not
kill them.
To be safe, food must be
cooked at a high enough tem-
perature to kill bacteria, then
stored in a way that inhibits
recontamination and growth.
As a general rule, keep hot
foods hot and cold foods cool.
Limit the amount of time food
is at a temperature where
bacteria can multiply and
be safe; food should be
kept at room temperature for
no longer than two hours.
That means that after sit-
ting on the table during
dinner, leftovers should go
right in the refrigerator. It
also means that a kettle of
hot soup should not cool on
the stovetop for hours before
it goes into the refrigerator.
You can cool the pot down
by dividing its contents into
small containers or placing it
in a sink full of cold water,
then refrigerating it. There's
a myth that hot food should
not go directly in the re-
frigerator — probably a hold-
over from the days of the
icebox. Most new energy-
efficient refrigerators are
capable of handling the extra
cooling load with ease.

Defrosting

Food should be allowed to
defrost in the refrigerator or
in a covered container sub-
merged in cold water. It
should be cooked promptly
when defrosted. The best
temperature for the home
freezer is 0 degrees. In a
refrigerator, food keeps best
at 34 to 38 degrees.
Kitchen counters and chop-
ping boards should be cleaned
between each use with warm
soapy water. All utensils that
come in contact with raw
meat should be cleaned before
they are used on other food to
avoid cross contamination.
A wooden chopping block
needs rigorous cleansing. It's
a good idea to have different
ones for different purposes, so
you're not chopping vegeta-
bles in juices from raw meat.
Cooked food can become

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan