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December 23, 1988 - Image 26

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1988-12-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

A Little Assistance

Continued from Page 23

home. She has been there
about four months. Her mon-
thly costs average $3,000. If
her money runs out, she will
be forced to move into a non-
profit home — probably the
Jewish Home For Aged —
which accepts government-
assisted residents.
Fortunately for Weber, she
has money to choose a place
to . live. She would like her
own apartment, but that is
not possible. Her daughter
says the home is not a matter
of choice, but of necessity. It
is not either one wants, but
what must be done.
"It's not easy," Roberg ex-
plains. "But it is part of being
Jewish. Jewish law says we
must take care of our elders.
It was never a question with
us. It is wonderful for us to
still have her."
KL

presents

THE HOLIDAY
CLEARANCE SALE!

All 1988 New, Corporate and
Executive Car Sale!

Perfect Planning

Continued from Page 24

Now di Dec. 31—Only 26 Vehicles
Left to Choose From

keep well and stick around to
take care of each other."
Harry calls himself old. Giz-
zy says he never stops talking
about it. Harry would rather
die than live in a nursing
home. Gizzy says she wouldn't
mind such a life if her health
required around-the-clock
care.
"We are old," Harry says.
"We go to bed at night and
hope to wake up."
Adds Gizzy, "I feel different-
ly. I'll go to great lengths to
make the best of my age. I
want to look the best I can. I
dye my hair and don't let
myself get fat. I walk a lot.
"I am an old lady and am
accepting it," she says. "But
I don't want a grey bun on top
of my head."
KL

DREISBACH EXCLUSIVE

INCENTIVES RESULTING
IN HUGE DISCOUNTS!

Community

Continued from Page 25

"5.M6 APR on amount financed of
On Grand River
on t' a pproved
el ill" credit.
j P .13;ict 531-2600
Just W. of Telegraph $20,000.
Zir 112416:
Based °f on

JEWELRY APPRAISALS

At Very Reasonable Prices Call For An Appointment

V( I tatem,F6ri

established 1919

J EWELERS

GEM/DIAMOND SPEPCI IALI
VE ST

L

26

AWARDED CERTIFICATE BY GIA
IN GRADING AND EVALUATION

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1988

30400 Telegraph Road
Suite 134
Birmingham, MI 48010

(313) 642-5575

Doily 10-7
Sat. 10-4
Sun. 12-4



JVS offers companions and
health care aids for the elder-
ly temporarily unable to care
for themselves and for people
recently released from area
hospitals. And Project
Outreach provides advocacy
services, cultural activities
and religious services to
Jewish elderly and indigent
persons isolated from the
community. Some live in nur-
sing homes and some live in
inner city apartments. To
date, Project Outreach has
targeted about 140 isolated
elderly Jews.
"Hopefully, one day, when I
need help, it will be there;'
says Bessie Chase, 78, an ac-
tive JVS volunteer with Pro-

ject Outreach. "Thank God
older people can help other
older people. They know so-
meone cares. But I help simp-
ly because I want to help. It's
my personality."
At the woodcarving group,
the men help each other. It
began about 12 years ago by
a man whose hobby was
woodcarving. He taught
Stepak. Now Stepak teaches
others. Most have no
background in woodcarving
when they join the group. And
most — like Stepak — never
dreamed they possessed such
talents. Stepak's work is on
display in his home and at
Congregation B'nai Moshe.
"This is not work, it's relax-
ation," says woodcarver, Joe
Math, 69. "When I retired in
1981, my wife was afraid I
would become a couch potato.
All I did was read. So I came
here and met these guys."
KL

'1"11 NEWS

UJA Raises
Funds For AIDS

New York (JTA) — UJA-
Federation of New York and
the Liz Claiborne Foundation
have agreed to fund a
$240,000 multifaceted pro-
gram to help local communal
service agencies respond to
the AIDS crisis.
UJA-Federation and three
of its member agencies — the
Jewish Board of Family and
Children's Services, Jewish
Community Services of Long
Island and Westchester
Jewish Community Services
— have launched a $132,500
education and training pro-
gram aimed at agency ex-
ecutives, social service profes-
sionals, lay and religious
leaders and the community at
large.
An AIDS education manual
to be used by philanthropic
organizations and govern-
ment agencies will also be
produced.
The remainder of the grant
will be funneled to the New
York AIDS Coalition; the
Village Nursing Home to pay
fees for Jewish AIDS patients
not covered under Medicaid;
a forum of private founda-
tions and agencies to ex-
change ideas for AIDS ser-
vices; and various AIDS pro-
jects throughout the year.
The Council for Jewish
Federations and UJA-
Federation will also sponsor a
closed-circuit television pro-
gram about AIDS for 40
federations, agencies and
synagogues in 25 American
cities.

a.

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